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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Learning the Open Lopez (Read 21346 times)
chandrashekharkoravi
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #17 - 09/23/14 at 06:50:35
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If you are serious in learning the open lopez I recommend you to study Victor Korchonoi's games and the current expert Victor Mikhalevski his book on Grandmaster Repertoire 13 is a must for every open lopez player
  
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Markovich
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #16 - 04/08/10 at 12:47:32
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That's right, in Ivanchuk-Carlson, 8...Bd6 should have been played.  I don't have my notes right now, but I recall that Black just keeps developing, sacs two pieces for a rook on e4, then plays ...f5.  What would that be, something like 9.Qd3 O-O 10.Rxe4 Bxe4 11.Qxe4 f5?  Black is quite fine then, I think, with 12...e4 and a kingside pawn storm brewing, and no obvious counterplay for White.  Black has played in perfectly classical fashion, while White has wasted time on minor material gain.  So those exclamation points awarded by TN above are quite undeserved, in my view.

I think that the 3...Nf6 path to the Open is in fact Black's most precise method of reaching it.  For one thing, there is absolutely nothing to fear in the 5.Re1 lines.  There is some serious theory to know when White plays g4 versus Bf5, but it works out well for Black.
  

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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #15 - 04/08/10 at 02:03:31
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joakimvitriol
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #14 - 04/06/10 at 15:58:22
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MNb wrote on 04/06/10 at 11:18:55:
7.Re1 is pretty strong indeed according to statistics; White wins more than half of the games.

In chesslive database most of the players play 7. d4. I found two games where Shirov and Short played 7. Re1 but this games are from simuls and both ended in a draw.

TN wrote on 04/06/10 at 12:14:21:
The best 'alternative' move order for reaching the Lopez is probably 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Ne4 5.d4 a6, although this also has its problems after 6.Bc6 dc6 7.Qe2! Bf5 8.Re1! when White is slightly better.

The advantages of this move order are that you avoid the Exchange Variation with 3...a6 4.Bc6 (since 4.Bc6 is harmless against 3...Nf6), you avoid the Worrall and 5.d3, the latter of which has increased in popularity recently, and White's alternatives 4.Nc3, 4.d3 and 4.Qe2 are considered completely harmless. The main disadvantage is that White can gain a slight advantage if he knows the theory, but the surprise effect (5...a6 will take most under 2000 players out of book) probably outweighs this.

So it boils down to whether you would prefer to face the Exchange, Worrall and 5.d3 or 4.Nc3, 4.d3 and, against a well-prepared opponent, the Ivanchuk novelty.


TN wrote on 04/06/10 at 12:15:51:
I forgot to mention: White can also play 5.Re1 instead of 5.d4 in the 5...a6 move order. It's equal but Black still has to know about 15 moves of theory - not that this should perturb an Open Ruy devotee.


I have never before seen this move order. Reaching Open Spanish from Berlin. I found one game on the highest level:
[Event "Morelia/Linares 25th"]
[Site "Morelia/Linares"]
[Date "2008.02.28"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Ivanchuk, Vassily"]
[Black "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C67"]
[WhiteElo "2751"]
[BlackElo "2733"]
[PlyCount "79"]
[EventDate "2008.02.15"]
[EventType "tourn"]
[EventRounds "14"]
[EventCountry "ESP"]
[EventCategory "21"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2008.04.02"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 a6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. Qe2 Bf5 8.
Re1 Bb4 9. c3 Bd6 10. Qc2 Qd7 11. dxe5 Bc5 12. Rxe4 O-O-O 13. Nbd2 Qd5 14. Kf1
Rhe8 15. b3 g5 16. Bb2 g4 17. Nd4 Bxd4 18. cxd4 c5 19. Rae1 cxd4 20. Qc4 Bxe4
21. Rxe4 Rxe5 22. Rxg4 Rde8 23. Nf3 Qxc4+ 24. bxc4 Re2 25. Bxd4 Rxa2 26. Rg7 a5
27. Rxf7 Rc2 28. g4 a4 29. g5 a3 30. Rxh7 a2 31. Rh8 Rxh8 32. Bxh8 Rxc4 33. h3
c5 34. Ne1 Rc1 35. g6 Kd7 36. Bb2 Ke6 37. h4 c4 38. h5 c3 39. Bxc1 a1=Q 40. Nd3
0-1

According to engines 8...Bb4 was mistake and Carlsen should have played 8...Bd6.


  
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TN
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #13 - 04/06/10 at 12:15:51
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I forgot to mention: White can also play 5.Re1 instead of 5.d4 in the 5...a6 move order. It's equal but Black still has to know about 15 moves of theory - not that this should perturb an Open Ruy devotee.
  

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TN
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #12 - 04/06/10 at 12:14:21
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The best 'alternative' move order for reaching the Lopez is probably 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Ne4 5.d4 a6, although this also has its problems after 6.Bc6 dc6 7.Qe2! Bf5 8.Re1! when White is slightly better.

The advantages of this move order are that you avoid the Exchange Variation with 3...a6 4.Bc6 (since 4.Bc6 is harmless against 3...Nf6), you avoid the Worrall and 5.d3, the latter of which has increased in popularity recently, and White's alternatives 4.Nc3, 4.d3 and 4.Qe2 are considered completely harmless. The main disadvantage is that White can gain a slight advantage if he knows the theory, but the surprise effect (5...a6 will take most under 2000 players out of book) probably outweighs this.

So it boils down to whether you would prefer to face the Exchange, Worrall and 5.d3 or 4.Nc3, 4.d3 and, against a well-prepared opponent, the Ivanchuk novelty.
  

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MNb
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #11 - 04/06/10 at 11:18:55
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7.Re1 is pretty strong indeed according to statistics; White wins more than half of the games.
  

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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #10 - 04/06/10 at 06:22:17
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Is there difference between move order like this :
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Nxe4

and normal move order or white should play 7. Re1 instead of 7. d4 ?
  
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #9 - 02/18/10 at 17:43:12
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I have decided to play 9 Nbd2 Nc5 10 c3 Bg4. Instead of playing 15...Ne7 as in Nils Grandelius-Ivan Sokolov, I will play 15...d4 as recommended by John Watson. Is there any theoretical problem with this approach. Thank you for all your previous help.
  
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ANDREW BRETT
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #8 - 01/26/10 at 08:52:29
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You might want to look at Short and Caruana games as they have played it with success recently. In Wijk Caruana should have drawn comfortably v Shirov . Karjakin plays the white side quite well.
  
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Göran
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #7 - 01/25/10 at 13:01:29
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Thank you for the warning.
Found it on Amazon for Ł25.62 + shipping from US to Sweden. Rather expensive. Have to be carefull with the binding.
When you mention it I remember previously having some books with that binding -after opening it a couple of times it just fell apart into a bunch of loose pages.

If the content is good it's OK! Especially since I already have ordered it. Could copy it perhaps and read the copy.
  

What kind of proof is that?
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TalJechin
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #6 - 01/25/10 at 09:34:13
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Paddy wrote on 01/24/10 at 23:50:30:
Göran wrote on 01/24/10 at 23:30:20:
Paddy wrote on 01/24/10 at 21:47:04:
Watsonfox wrote on 01/24/10 at 13:05:55:
I have decided to learn the Open Lopez as black and I have a few questions.
What are the critical lines?
What model games do you recommend to study?
Who are the experts in this line


Books first: Flear's books are always of a good standard and can be recommended, but for learning the ideas of this opening I suggest Krasenkow's book is still the number one choice.

Players: Tarrasch, Euwe, Korchnoi, Anand, Ivanchuk, Jussupow, Krasenkow, Marin, Korneev, Mikhalevski, Flear, Sorin, Sipke Ernst.


Cannot find Krasenkow's book on the net. Do you have the title?


Michał Krasenkow (1995). The Open Spanish. Cadogan. ISBN 1857441419

Out of date in many important lines, inevitably, but updating is easy with a good database and Krasenkow provides a firm foundation on which to build your understanding.


The big downside of Cadogan is that the binding was often horribly bad - if you read it like a normal chessbook the pages would start falling out quite soon. So, if you find it don't pay too much for it if you intend to read it!
  
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Göran
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #5 - 01/25/10 at 01:55:00
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Thanks Paddy, appreciate it.
Actally I bought Larsen's Open Spanish a month a go on Alibris. Very reasonable price. Theory outdated but simple clear explanations will never be outdated.
  

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Paddy
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #4 - 01/24/10 at 23:50:30
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Göran wrote on 01/24/10 at 23:30:20:
Paddy wrote on 01/24/10 at 21:47:04:
Watsonfox wrote on 01/24/10 at 13:05:55:
I have decided to learn the Open Lopez as black and I have a few questions.
What are the critical lines?
What model games do you recommend to study?
Who are the experts in this line


Books first: Flear's books are always of a good standard and can be recommended, but for learning the ideas of this opening I suggest Krasenkow's book is still the number one choice.

Players: Tarrasch, Euwe, Korchnoi, Anand, Ivanchuk, Jussupow, Krasenkow, Marin, Korneev, Mikhalevski, Flear, Sorin, Sipke Ernst.


Cannot find Krasenkow's book on the net. Do you have the title?


Michał Krasenkow (1995). The Open Spanish. Cadogan. ISBN 1857441419

Out of date in many important lines, inevitably, but updating is easy with a good database and Krasenkow provides a firm foundation on which to build your understanding.
  
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Göran
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Re: Learning the Open Lopez
Reply #3 - 01/24/10 at 23:30:20
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Paddy wrote on 01/24/10 at 21:47:04:
Watsonfox wrote on 01/24/10 at 13:05:55:
I have decided to learn the Open Lopez as black and I have a few questions.
What are the critical lines?
What model games do you recommend to study?
Who are the experts in this line


Books first: Flear's books are always of a good standard and can be recommended, but for learning the ideas of this opening I suggest Krasenkow's book is still the number one choice.

Players: Tarrasch, Euwe, Korchnoi, Anand, Ivanchuk, Jussupow, Krasenkow, Marin, Korneev, Mikhalevski, Flear, Sorin, Sipke Ernst.


Cannot find Krasenkow's book on the net. Do you have the title?
  

What kind of proof is that?
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