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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Queen Bishop's Attack (Read 10004 times)
Straggler
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #13 - 03/29/11 at 14:42:44
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I wouldn't mind playing (as White) the Black side of a Veresov, but that only happens after 2...f6 3.Bf4 Nc6 4.Nf3 Bg4. It's 4...g5 that I really dislike. So I think I would have to go with 4.e3, which looks OK for White (but also fine for Black).
  
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #12 - 03/29/11 at 13:15:54
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Straggler wrote on 03/29/11 at 11:18:57:
Having had some modest success with the Tromp, I would happily play the QBA if I thought White could hope for an edge or attacking chances. Sometimes you end up with a sort of London system in which Black has weakened his kingside pawns, which is fine by me (especially since you don't get sneered at by people who dislike the London). But I can't see how White can hope for anything much against 2...f6, which is what many people play even if they don't know any theory. Hodgson rarely had to face this, for some reason.


2...f6 became a lot more popular when it was analysed in an SOS article by Jeroen Bosch and recommended in Wisnewski's 'Play 1...Nc6'.

I agree with you, Black is just equal after 2...f6 3.Bh4 Nh6 (winning the bishop pair or encouraging the awkward 4.f3) and 3.Bf4 Nc6 4.Nf3 (a Veresov with colours reversed, which is considered equal by theory).
  

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Straggler
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #11 - 03/29/11 at 11:18:57
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Having had some modest success with the Tromp, I would happily play the QBA if I thought White could hope for an edge or attacking chances. Sometimes you end up with a sort of London system in which Black has weakened his kingside pawns, which is fine by me (especially since you don't get sneered at by people who dislike the London). But I can't see how White can hope for anything much against 2...f6, which is what many people play even if they don't know any theory. Hodgson rarely had to face this, for some reason.
  
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JonathanB
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #10 - 03/29/11 at 10:40:39
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Merovingian wrote on 03/29/11 at 03:43:42:
White has an edge in all lines, or at the very least good compensation and attacking in an unclear position.


I very much doubt that, which is not to say that White is worse or doesn't have a game s/he can play.

Hodgson had a very interesting opening repertoire when he was an active player (1 e4 d6, 2 d4 Nf6, 3 Nc3 c6 was another favourite at one time).  Obviously he was very successful, and I'm quite sure he didn't care one jot about the 'truth'/theoretical status of what he was playing.  That doesn't make it += though.
  

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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #9 - 03/29/11 at 06:52:13
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Rizzitano is also analysing some lines in his How to beat 1 d4.
  
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #8 - 03/29/11 at 03:43:42
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I am certainly interested, as this is my main line weapon vs. 1.d5 I will do something a bit more thorough and start a new thread on what I have found to be playable white lines. There are lots of options, traps, zaps. You can play solidly, sharply, auto-pilotly or really aggressive with pawn sac lines. Just working out my repertoire at the moment from old Hodson, Miles, and Adams games. Anand used in in a must win game vs. Karpov, lost but he had some faith  obviously inits merits. It cuts down massive theory and you get to play on your home turf. There is maybe 4-5 minelines, but White has an edge in all lines, or at the very least good compensation and attacking in an unclear position. This is for over the board play, not sure if I have aspirations to make it into a full blown corr. Chess rep or not.

It would be nice to have some help though for those interested.

I will say this. Lots of untouched, unexplored theory left here to explore, it DOES develop a piece, Hodgson made a living off this "junk" for years. Another interesting resource is the late Genrikh Chepukaitis who played nothing else but Bg5.

More to come soon, I want us to exchange ideas in the topical lines.

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Merovingian
  

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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #7 - 02/04/10 at 10:57:47
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But aren't there more interesting replies than this 'main line' ? I mean, there is no need to harass the bishop (as it does not even threaten anything) and I would prefer to play c5 in one go.
  
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #6 - 02/03/10 at 13:57:13
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Stigma wrote on 01/29/10 at 19:16:35:
Cox is a thorough author so it should be mentioned in his "Dealing with d4 deviations".


It is.  I believe he suggests 1.d4 d5 2.Bg5 h6 3.Bh4 c6, just as you give as the main line.
  
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #5 - 02/03/10 at 13:03:54
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I played it a few times in casual games. It is not bad but black can ignore the bishop on g5 (or h4 after h6) as white hasn't got the positional threat of Bxf6 like in the Tromp.

Like said before: it's a game of chess.
  
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #4 - 02/03/10 at 10:17:44
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Personally, I don't like ...Qb6 in the supposed main line. (1.d4, d5 2. Bg5, h6 3. Bh4, c6 4. e3 /...)
  
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #3 - 01/30/10 at 11:46:38
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Stigma wrote on 01/29/10 at 19:16:35:
This is called the Levitsky Attack, sometimes played by those who also use the Trompowsky (1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5). But it's considered less troublesome for Black than the Trompowsky and not often seen on GM level these days.

Gallagher had brief coverage of it in his old (1998) Trompowsky book, and there's bound to be something on ChessPublishing too. Cox is a thorough author so it should be mentioned in his "Dealing with d4 deviations".

I just remembered there is an entire book by Plaskett on 1.d4 d5 2.Bg5, but it had mixed recepetion from the reviewers.

2...h6 3.Bh4 c6 4.e3 Qb6 is often recommeded as an easy equalizer, but it's still a game of chess of course.


To be fair, Plaskett's book got absolutely butchered.

Yeah, Bg5 is fine. It develops a piece. Cannot be too wrong.
  
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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #2 - 01/29/10 at 22:08:24
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Cox recommends 2...h6 3.Bh4 c6 in his book, but there's also something to be said for 2...f6!?, when after 3.Bf4 Nc6 Black is playing a Veresov (not even a Veresov reversed), and after 3.Bh4 Nh6, current theory states that Black shouldn't have any problems.

Finally, there is 2...Nf6, which should also eventually equalise, but this is more likely to play to the opponent's strengths, especially if they also play the Trompowsky.
  

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Re: Queen Bishop's Attack
Reply #1 - 01/29/10 at 19:16:35
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This is called the Levitsky Attack, sometimes played by those who also use the Trompowsky (1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5). But it's considered less troublesome for Black than the Trompowsky and not often seen on GM level these days.

Gallagher had brief coverage of it in his old (1998) Trompowsky book, and there's bound to be something on ChessPublishing too. Cox is a thorough author so it should be mentioned in his "Dealing with d4 deviations".

I just remembered there is an entire book by Plaskett on 1.d4 d5 2.Bg5, but it had mixed recepetion from the reviewers.

2...h6 3.Bh4 c6 4.e3 Qb6 is often recommeded as an easy equalizer, but it's still a game of chess of course.
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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Queen Bishop's Attack
01/29/10 at 18:36:51
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I came across this opening in a tournament recently:

1 d4 d5 2 Bg5

I ended up playing g6 and Bg7 and kind transposing into a schlecter defense.

Is this a serious opening? does anyone know where to find resources on it, or what a good way to deal with it is?
  
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