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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams (Read 34533 times)
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #32 - 02/28/17 at 20:11:51
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Mtal wrote on 02/09/16 at 16:17:48:
[quote author=7873711C0 link=1306157023/15#15 date=1306842598]

Just wondering why 7...nce7?


The point, I assume, is to play ...Bf5 and exchange Bishops without allowing the standard 7...Nge7 8 Qh5
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #31 - 02/09/16 at 16:17:48
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[quote author=7873711C0 link=1306157023/15#15 date=1306842598]About the Exchange...

4.Bf4: discussed a little on this forum (search for Taljechin post and the answer 4...Bd6!?)

4 Nf3 Bg4: variation I play (I can name it"Kasparov's line" if long castle for White and Black ... "opposite castling" if White castles short and Black long..merely with a Nc6 move for Black...see McDonald's book about French Winawer.. "Morphy stategy")

4...c6: I will not play it except for 4.Bb5+ c6 5.Bd3..because it not fits in my systems with opposite side castling....maybe book ginger runs for the "classical" lines of the Exchange (with short castles White and Black)

4 Bd3 Nc6 5 c3 Bd6 : opposite castling line, Nc6 deters White from playing c4

with 6 Nf3 Bg4 or 6 Qf3 Be6 7 Ne2 Qd7

4 c4 Nf6 5 Nf3 Be7 : going for queen's gambit line with isolated d-pawn line for White. I recommend to work about Normund Miesies games (with White).

and I add

4.Nc3 Bb4 5.Bd3 Nc6 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 and here my current work (about many lines in my French repertoire) showed me (last saturday) an unsual line with 7...Nce7!?


Just wondering why 7...nce7?
  
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Re: C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams
Reply #30 - 05/03/15 at 04:40:32
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Thanks for that. I have the DVDs, but I haven't finished watching them yet. I was thinking of getting the book as a companion, so I can look up the lines easily. Knowing where they differ helps with knowing how that will work out.

Also, I don't currently play the Winawer (I like the MacCutcheon too much), though I may try it out if Williams makes it look fun enough. Not for at least another 3 weeks, though - I'm currently training for a major tourney, and just trying to learn my current openings better, not switch any out.

  

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Re: C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams
Reply #29 - 05/03/15 at 00:25:57
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Fromper wrote on 05/01/15 at 05:34:30:
Any info would be appreciated.

There is alreday a lot in the thread about what lines are covered in the book, so if you have the DVD, you can just compare them. Obviously the book is a bit more detailed, but both are "minimal" repertoires that don't offer Black many choices along the way. The choices are generally the same initially (Winawer, 3...Nf6 Tarrasch, 5...Bd7 Advance), though in some cases they diverge a bit later.

Some differences that I've taken note of (didn't bother to go watch the DVD again, so no guarantees):

Winawer: The book uses a 4.e5 c5 move order, while the DVD used 4.e5 Ne7. This makes a difference in some sidelines, importantly the 5.Bd2 line (though it is arguably toothless against both 4...Ne7 and 4...c5 if Black knows what he's doing)

Winawer 7.Qg4: The book gives a tricky sideline with 12...Nf5 in the Poisoned Pawn, while the DVD gave what is currently the absolute main line with 12...d4 intending 13.Nxd4 Nxd4 14.Qxd4 Bd7

Tarrasch 5.f4: The book gives the very main 7...Qb6, while the DVD had some ...a5 line (7...cxd4 8.cxd4 a5 IIRC) which I found hard to trust

Advance: The book avoids the Milner-Barry Gambit with the ...Rc8 line mentioned below, while the DVD allowed it

Advance: The book meets the critical 5...Bd7 6.Be2 with 6...f6!? (as against 6.a3, where it is probably stronger and scores very well), while the DVD had the more traditional 6...Nge7. There is some disagreement between various authors on the merits of the DVD's further 7.0-0 Nf5!? (Antic/Maksimovic also think it's playable, and I would love to believe them!)

KIA 2.d3: The book switches to a Sicilian with 2...c5, while IIRC the DVD had some setup with ...d5 and ...g6.
« Last Edit: 05/03/15 at 15:53:55 by Stigma »  

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Re: C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams
Reply #28 - 05/01/15 at 05:34:30
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So I see this thread's been dead for a while, but I figured I'd ask anyway, and hopefully somebody who knows will answer. Does Williams cover all the same lines in this book that he did in the "Killer French" DVDs? Are there significant differences between the two, as far as his repertoire choices? Or more variety of lines in the book or something?

Any info would be appreciated.
  

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Re: C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams
Reply #27 - 06/05/14 at 14:46:26
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I recently bought a copy of Williams' book and really liked what i saw. Very much in the tone of Ward's book on the Dragon and Gallagher's on the Kings Gambit that i read many years ago.

Although, i notice the Tarrasch variations were surprisingly less confident than the lines against the Advance for example. This thread has suggested that some of the lines may have been unsound. Has there been any significant holes found in them other than what Ericthered has mentioned?

I'm only graded around 130ecf so i'm not too concerned yet if there is (as just aborbing the information williams gives on plans and tactics will be enough to get me going and its unlikely that my opponents will be too aware of correct lines to punish me), However, i am curious as to what i should be aware of if i stick with the opening and if i start playing stronger players.
  

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Re: C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams
Reply #26 - 07/29/11 at 09:11:10
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I wouldn't say gaps, its more about the odd thing perhaps not being super thorough, and more importantly some of the lines being (purposefully!) slightly marginal in terms of soundness.

Depends what you're after Smiley If you're happy with the lines then suspect mostly just the usual bit of database/analysis work.

If you want some sounder back up/alternative lines then either one of the generalist books (Psakhis say), or play the French 3.
(or one of the several other French repitoire books about.).

Of course a chesspub subcription to the French section might well do both Smiley (no guarantees cf coverage of all of William's stuff but certainly some of it, and plenty of alternative ideas to chew over!).

I'm not totally sure if either of the books you mention will quite do either. They're more coverage of a few interesting lines than anything more specific. They might well give some good ideas for alternative lines, and its all useful knowledge.

Really do think its a little bit of a mistake to tightly fixate on one repitoire because one of the French's biggest pluses is the sheer variety of sound ideas it offers black.
  
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Re: C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams
Reply #25 - 07/29/11 at 05:28:39
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Could anyone recommend any other French books to fill in any gaps from Williams' book? I already own his DVD's which are excellent imo. From some initial research "The Flexible French" and "Wonderful Winawer" seem to be popular, but I'm concerned whether they overlap too much?
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #24 - 06/30/11 at 09:34:53
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Yup. Interesting that PTF2 had this in a side note but (suboptimally I think?) without g5/h3 included.

No mention of 10 Nbd2 but 10 Nxd4 is in with a - seemingly entirely reasonable - comment that its just a bad version of the TMB.

Not that this section is unobjectionable - using 11 Nxd4 Bc5 12 o-o? as his main (complete) game is a bit bizzarely wasteful! Perhaps it was the only good game he could fine, in which case its the format at fault Smiley

The coverage of 7 dc is a bit light/dismissive too. After all whites getting what was a main line (esp if a subsequent b4/b5) with black committed to an unusually early, if reasonable, Rc8. It might in fact be whites best in a practical sense this.

Also you could quibble that after what he identifies as the critical 12 Ne2 - in an extensive side note - and then 12.. Bxf2+ 13 Kf1 f6 14 Nbc3 fe 15 Ba4 he only gives 15 .. Bc5 16 Bxg5 Be7 and isn't clear if black is OK or not.

Fair enough but 16 .. Ne7 really does seems more logical and could well be a little better. But then again by then I think he's already gone a little beyond what anyone else has done on this.

So I don't know. You can imagine how scary the chapter would look if say Watson was giving this as a primary choice!
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #23 - 06/30/11 at 08:00:16
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In ErictheRed's reply #20 the line 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bd7 6.Bd3 Rc8!? is mentioned.
First of all I have to admit that I don't have a copy. Therefore I assume Black's piece sac will come after 7.a3 cxd4 8.cxd4 Qb6 9.Bc2 g5 10.h3 Nxd4.
I'm curious whether he analysed the possibilities after 9.0-0!? Nxd4 10.Nxd4 or 10.Nbd2!?.
Hope someone can help.
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #22 - 06/28/11 at 12:45:23
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Yes, thats tricky.

Its unarguably not the sort of very thorough book that say Watson produces and you'd be mad to rely on it for correspondence chess!

What I'm not sure about is how serious that is. The book seems to be aiming at the sort of people who want to get rather sharp positions permitting attacking play regardless of their absolute theoretical merit.

The lines seem good for that and there's perhaps enough detail - at UK club level I'd say that there probably is. There's some detail in places and - unlike quite a few gambit repitoires - a plausibly sound basis for it all.

So on those terms perhaps OK. Subjectively I found it fun to read, and wouldn't use most of the lines anyway for various reasons (a lot of choice in the French!).
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #21 - 06/25/11 at 01:09:08
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What do you think about the amount and quality of Williams' analysis?

My impression after only a brief look at the book was that he gives way too few details for such a dynamic repertoire.
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #20 - 06/24/11 at 14:29:23
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Back to Simon Williams' book, my copy arrived a few days ago.  I played the French a while back and I'm starting to play it again in tournaments, so I'm no expert but I wanted to give my first impressions.

Williams does an excellent job verbally explaining what is going on in most positions.  For the most part he's chosen very instructive games  and actually treats the Exchange with a little bit of depth. 

His chosen repertoire lines are all extremely sharp.  I get the impression that the book is almost more of a large Dangerous Weapons repertoire from Black's point of view.  For instance, in the Advance Variation, he focuses exclusively on 5...Bd7 intending ...f6, Qc7, and 0-0-0.  Certainly fun stuff but it's a far cry from the Nimzovitch approved way of handling these positions.  At times I wish he provided some coverage of more "positional" stuff; in my opinion, the regular lines of the Advance give Black plenty of opportunity to play for a win.  But others might love his recommendations.  There are a lot of interesting ideas here (at least for someone that hasn't kept up with all the latest theory like myself).  One recommendation I find intriguing is 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Bd7 6.Bd3 Rc8!?, threatening to play ...cxd4 and ...Nb4 going after White's Bishop.  Williams' main line leads to some very interesting tactical possibilities for Black where the 2nd player sacs a piece for two pawns and some chances against White's King.  I don't know if it will end up being rubbish or not, but it's certainly interesting.  That's my main gripe with the book, though; a lot of his recommendations look interesting (and he's played most of them himself), but I get the feeling that, deep down, they just might not be entirely sound.  Stronger players and time can judge.

Also, I played the old game of pitting repertoire book vs. repertoire book with Tzermiadianos' book.  Frankly, I thought Tzermiadianos did a better job of covering the line where the two books overlap.  Williams' line ends with the conclusion of approximate dynamic equality (I don't remember the exact phrase he used) and Tzermiadianos claims a slight edge for White.  I agree with the Tzermiadianos, but you can't really complain about White getting an edge.  My problem is that Williams doesn't really offer any new ideas to combat Tzermiadianos' repertoire; if you play Williams' recommendation down the line against Tzermiadianos', you won't present the White player with any new problems to solve.  Maybe I missed some notes or something somewhere, but that was my impression.  You can't expect Williams to completely overturn theory, but I think most authors can be expected to provide new problems to present against other popular repertoire books, and I don't think Williams did that here.

Those are my initial thoughts; I'd be curious to hear other people's as well.
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #19 - 06/03/11 at 14:47:42
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TN wrote on 06/01/11 at 04:24:00:
I'm quite shocked by some of the posts criticising Marshall's article.


Shocked? Just check the lines.

Quote:
The aim of these columns is not to provide a comprehensive coverage of the theory of a variation but rather to explain contemporary opening variations move by move, so that club players and below understand the variation well enough to play it successfully. (...)


Well, I guess even an average player may like to hear the pros and cons? Even an average player may like to be informed about whats going on.

Ok. lets check some default lines.
As I said, ...4...Bf5 equalizes. In the line she gives, 11...0-0 gives black (at least) easy equality.
Ehm ... and thats the target of white vs the french?

Following game 1 after 5...Qe7 she gives 6.Be2 (What else?) now after 6...Nf6 (instead of Bxf4) black may even be a little bit better. After less than 10 moves. And that's what white is heading for being white vs the French?

And in the line with Bxf4 that she gives, black is 2 pawns up. Surely, white has compensation. But 2 pawns are 2 pawns, and the only weakness of black is c7. And if black after 11.0-0 0-0 12.Rc1 does not take the 3rd pawn and plays 12...Ng6 instead white has to prove a lot IMHO

Following games 1: She does not mention 7...Nc6 Though white again may be a tiny little bit worse after that.
After 8...Nc6 she gives 9.0-0-0 Nb4 10 f3.

She gives an unclear, which IMHO is correct.
And that is a good repertoire recommendation?
Being about equal with white and black has good counterplay?

Sorry, but lower rated many players might take this for serious. And wake up in a nightmare.
  

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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #18 - 06/01/11 at 04:24:00
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I'm quite shocked by some of the posts criticising Marshall's article.

The aim of these columns is not to provide a comprehensive coverage of the theory of a variation but rather to explain contemporary opening variations move by move, so that club players and below understand the variation well enough to play it successfully. The target audience for these columns is <2000 players, for whom the opening will rarely decide the outcome of the game. That said, even I have learned from her columns.

If I claimed that 'Chess Tactics for Beginners' was a terrible program because I find all the puzzles very easy, everyone would laugh at me. However it seems to be okay to do a hatchet job of any opening book or article if you are not the target audience.

I think dom's reply is the most constructive - some lines aren't considered, but that said, the article doesn't try to cover absolutely everything.

Daniel, Sverre Johnsen wrote the second edition of 'A Killer Chess Opening Repertoire' by himself, and the book was quite good. Also, David Rudel is not a bad chess author.

I've gone quite off-topic, so I'll mention that Robert Hess has used 3.ed5 ed5 4.Bf4 with success. So it's certainly not a bad repertoire recommendation.
  

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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #17 - 05/31/11 at 23:36:12
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Why 2100 Elo players should not write about chess.  A stronger player backing them up such as with Sverre Johnsen seems to work out ok though.

Of course it's not nearly as bad as David Rudel (under 1400) writing about the Colle-Zuketort.
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #16 - 05/31/11 at 20:58:11
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knightmare wrote on 05/31/11 at 10:01:07:
Concerning Bf4, I found an article by abby Marshall on Chesscafe yesterday, but that article is of extremely low quality.


I have ckecked the Abby Marshall's article (http://www.chesscafe.com/abby/abby.htm)...

I will not say "low quality" but "need improvement".

Some lines are missing such as:

4...Bd6!? 5.Bxd6 Qxd6 6.Nc3 Bf5 7.Nf3 Nd7 8.Bd3 Bxd3 9.Qxd3 and now 9....ooo (instead of Nfg6) Piroth-Apicella,France 2003

or 4...Nc6 (waiting for placement of White bishops and knights + hinder Bd3) and then 5.Nf3 Bd6 (because of quick development and Re8+ to threaten) eg 6.Qd2 Nf6 7.Nc3 oo 8.ooo Bb4!  ; 5.Nc3 Bb4 (at once) ; 5.Qd3 (ok for long castle but it is square for f1 bishop, no?) Nf6 6.ooo oo ; 5.Bb5 Bd6.

For 4...Bf5:  4...Bf5 5.Bd3 Bxd3 6.Qxd3 c6 7.Nd2 Bd6 8.Bxd6 Qxd6 9.Ngf3 Ne7 10.oo Nd7 11.Rfe1 oo 12.Re2 Ng6 13.g3 Rae8 is variation (or maybe main line, I have not checked it) of Karpov-Stein, Caracas 1970 game

  

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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #15 - 05/31/11 at 11:49:58
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About the Exchange...

4.Bf4: discussed a little on this forum (search for Taljechin post and the answer 4...Bd6!?)

4 Nf3 Bg4: variation I play (I can name it"Kasparov's line" if long castle for White and Black ... "opposite castling" if White castles short and Black long..merely with a Nc6 move for Black...see McDonald's book about French Winawer.. "Morphy stategy")

4...c6: I will not play it except for 4.Bb5+ c6 5.Bd3..because it not fits in my systems with opposite side castling....maybe book ginger runs for the "classical" lines of the Exchange (with short castles White and Black)

4 Bd3 Nc6 5 c3 Bd6 : opposite castling line, Nc6 deters White from playing c4

with 6 Nf3 Bg4 or 6 Qf3 Be6 7 Ne2 Qd7

4 c4 Nf6 5 Nf3 Be7 : going for queen's gambit line with isolated d-pawn line for White. I recommend to work about Normund Miesies games (with White).

and I add

4.Nc3 Bb4 5.Bd3 Nc6 6.a3 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 and here my current work (about many lines in my French repertoire) showed me (last saturday) an unsual line with 7...Nce7!?





  

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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #14 - 05/31/11 at 10:01:07
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ErictheRed wrote on 05/30/11 at 18:19:46:
I'm curious if he actually treats the Exchange with any depth?  What does he recommend against 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3, 4.Bd3, 4.Bf4, etc? 


Concerning Bf4, I found an article by abby Marshall on Chesscafe yesterday, but that article is of extremely low quality. 4...Bf5 equalizes on the spot, as white has to play Bd3, after which the whole idea (playing Qd2, 0-0-0 and a kingside attack) does not work anymore.

If you're frustrated with the Exchange, check the lines with queenside castling. Black has lots and lots of opportunities to play for a win in those lines. The only way to get something out of the opening in the Exchange for white is 4.c4.
  

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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #13 - 05/30/11 at 18:32:06
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ErictheRed wrote on 05/30/11 at 18:19:46:
I'm curious if he actually treats the Exchange with any depth?  What does he recommend against 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3, 4.Bd3, 4.Bf4, etc?


Yes, there's quite a lot on the Exchange, since "it does occur regularly at club level."

His lines are:

— 4 Nf3 Bg4 and 4...c6 5 Bd3 Bg4
— 4 Bd3 Nc6 5 c3 Bd6 with 6 Nf3 Bg4 or 6 Qf3 Be6 7 Ne2 Qd7
— 4 c4 Nf6 5 Nf3 Be7

4 Bf4 is not mentioned, but there's also some stuff on 3...Qxd5!?
  

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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #12 - 05/30/11 at 18:19:46
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I'm curious if he actually treats the Exchange with any depth?  What does he recommend against 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3, 4.Bd3, 4.Bf4, etc?  The main reason I don't play the French is that about 75% of my games against lower rated players ended up in the Exchange.  And I don't care what anyone says, those positions can be hard to win from.  Maybe I need more experience in them, or to study them more, but most resources basically ignore them and there isn't much study material out there.
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #11 - 05/29/11 at 17:06:07
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Suspect the overlap might well be minimal.

Think it'd be fair to say that all the lines are at least slightly speculative Smiley Its a little bit like an extended, sounder version of a dangerous weapons book.

In fact he's impressively/almost surprisingly honest about it in places.
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #10 - 05/29/11 at 15:18:00
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Daniel wrote on 05/28/11 at 18:56:31:
My only complaints are that some of the lines are speculative and he didn't use some excellent sources such as Moskalenko's Wonderful Winawer


Agreed, although im going to compare the two when i can be bothered and see if this matters
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #9 - 05/28/11 at 18:56:31
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My only complaints are that some of the lines are speculative and he didn't use some excellent sources such as Moskalenko's Wonderful Winawer
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #8 - 05/24/11 at 08:55:45
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No worries, he does Smiley
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #7 - 05/23/11 at 20:34:37
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Konstriktor wrote on 05/23/11 at 19:40:35:
Interesting!
And the Tarrasch? The 11. ... Qc7?


The time is really overdue for some in-depth coverage of this system now. I've been trying to learn it starting from Williams' DVD and Pedersen's Tarrasch book a.o., but the first thing I realized is that White actually has many different playable setups, and can choose sharp and critical or a calm maneouvrig game, according to taste.

The Williams DVD covered the main lines 12.Bg5 0-0 13.Bh4, 12.Bg5 0-0 13.Rc1 and 12.g3. But White can also play the old 12.Nc3 a6 13.Bg5 (considered += in NCO), simple development with 12.Nc3 a6 13.Be3 followed by h3, Re1 etc., or the recently popular 12.Bd2!?. In a blitz game just a few hours ago I faced the completely non-theoretical 12.Ng3 0-0 13.Re1 and even that gave White a reasonable position, and on my database even 12.b3 (once played by Gashimov) is scoring well.

So while I'm starting to believe Black should be OK in this line, he should prepare something specific against each of White's tries and not just focus on the current main lines.

PS: The sample looks very good and inspirational (just like Williams' DVDs!). I hope he takes the 9.Nf4 Tarrasch line a bit more seriously in the book than on the DVD though.  Wink
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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MartinC
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #6 - 05/23/11 at 20:19:21
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Yup. 3.. Nf6 with 11..Qc7, the critical g5 stuff vs the universal etc.  5 .. Bd7 with 6 .. f6 in the advance, with a very amusingly toxic anti Milner Barry.
(which I've used in one game a bit back, producing a 14 move win.....).

As per the goals of the series, very aggressive indeed, and mostly theoretically respected. Seems as if it'd be mostly great fun.

Suspect you'd need to do a bit more work to make it totally watertight for some uses (its certainly not as analytically dense as Watson say) but it'd have been a huge book then! And the fine detail is what gets obsoleted anyway.

And to be honest lines with this will always have vague/critical areas. Goes with the territory.
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #5 - 05/23/11 at 20:13:33
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Indeed!
  
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Re: Attacking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #4 - 05/23/11 at 19:40:35
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Interesting!
And the Tarrasch? The 11. ... Qc7?
  
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Re: Attaking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #3 - 05/23/11 at 17:16:34
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ericmittens wrote on 05/23/11 at 16:13:35:
If it's anything like his GingerGM DVD he'll be recommending Uhlmann's "universal" setup against the positional winawers (Nc6,Qa5,Bd7 etc...), as well as the poisoned pawn with an early d4.


In the "Poisoned Pawn" this time he recommends 7... Qc7 8.Qxg7 Rg8 9.Qxh7 cxd4 10.Ne2 Nbc6 11.f4 dxc3 12.Qd3 Nf5 instead of 12... d4 as on his DVD.
  
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Re: Attaking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #2 - 05/23/11 at 16:13:35
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If it's anything like his GingerGM DVD he'll be recommending Uhlmann's "universal" setup against the positional winawers (Nc6,Qa5,Bd7 etc...), as well as the poisoned pawn with an early d4.
  
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Re: Attaking Chess: The French by Simon Williams
Reply #1 - 05/23/11 at 15:55:34
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Looks interesting. With all the text analysis, it seems like it would be a good complement to something like Play the French.

What does Williams recommend for Black in the Winawer? (Not the Warsaw, to judge from the title!).
  
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C00-C19:AttackingChess:The French by SimonWilliams
05/23/11 at 13:23:43
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I placed an order a moment ago now that it became available at The Book Depository.

I hope I stop losing in the 3...Nf6 Tarrasch now.

Download sample

edit: title
« Last Edit: 07/21/11 at 16:59:23 by dom »  
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