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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Bird Repertoire (Read 40558 times)
Pcal
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #40 - 08/12/14 at 00:25:30
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Been playing the Bird for quite some time now. I agree, there are specifics in the Bird where the extra tempo can nullify the bid for the advantage. However 1.f4 I think is a solid first move. Plenty of ideas in the Classical Bird to try for an advantage. (not so much in the well worked out "Queenside Fianchetto" lines.)  I'm also not so much of a fan of "Leningrad Bird" (yet a lot of people are) I think,  if Black plays 1...c5 to me...  if White continues with g3 & Bg2 it plays into strategies well known to the Sicilian player (Because of the KIA and Closed var's)  I'm with Taylor Bird analysis on approaching 1...c5 with reverse English ...e5 lines (or reverse Classical Dutch lines ) I don't think your average Sicilian players is going to be familiar with these lines. And these lines can have real bite.  Also of the unbalancing nature of 1...c5,  IMO few if any var have that I've looked at are subject to the "extra tempo get's in the way effect"  All this said.... Personally, I think 1...f5 (The Symmetrical Bird)  is one of the best responses for Black, these lines are just as complex as Symmetrical English lines..

Just my 2 cents 
« Last Edit: 08/12/14 at 09:56:20 by Pcal »  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #39 - 05/22/14 at 21:48:25
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I don't have an answer to your specific question, but IIRC, Watson has written a bit about the topic of reversed openings (I remember something about using the extra tempo meant putting a pawn on prise on h3 or similar). Basically, some opening systems are playable or good for Black because the moves are played in reaction to White's moves. When played reversed, the extra move might hurt because it gives away information that Black can use.

Also, I also guess that while they are playable for Black because they lead to equality (and maybe also unbalanced positions), as White most top players want to fight for an (solid) advantage, not for equality.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #38 - 05/22/14 at 13:17:33
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nyoke wrote on 12/03/11 at 20:54:38:
Malaniuk is right, of course.

Theoretically it would seem so easy to drop a tempo, but practically you always end up losing two...


As I'm considering to add the Dutch to my black repertoire I was wondering why not look at the Bird as well - being a "Dutch a tempo up".
It puzzles me that virtually no strong GM is playing the Bird and I must admit: I don't get it.   
Huh

Why is the extra tempo hurting <sic!> so much as to Malaniuk and the rest refraining from playing the Bird??

I understand that the Bird is no opening where you are theoretically playing for an edge, but neither is stuff like the London and still there are strong GMs who play those systems once in a while.

Thanks,
Torsten
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #37 - 12/06/11 at 21:49:16
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Now that I understand your situation a little better I could conclude with a comment about the Odessky book, 1.b3, which was mentioned in this thread. I think your only interest in this one would be Chapters 16, 17, and 18 (p.156 to 182).

Basically Odessky discusses the positions after 1.b3 d5 2. Bb2 Nf6 3. Nf3 Bf5 with two options:

I. preparation for e4
II. play after c4 (A12 positions)

The A12 positions may be an overlap in your White repertoire (via the Reti) but it may not be high on your priority list at this time. I hope that unclouds the Odessky option a little.

All the best!

  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #36 - 12/06/11 at 17:21:05
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Again: thanks.

Yes: the plan was to start 1...d6 with Black and experiment with a variety of options after that (further argument, perhaps, for exploring 1.d3). I don't have the Davies DVD or the Barsky book, but I've got a fairly good library of material to draw from.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #35 - 12/06/11 at 09:14:27
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Quote:
Looking at various Philidor/Modern/Lion/Old Indian kinds of ideas for Black


Have you considered 1...d6? It seems to be able to offer you the transpositional opportunities that include all of your interests from the Black side.

One of the first books to surface on this opening approach was

An Explosive Chess Opening Repertoire for Black by Yrjola and Tella

Since then Vladimir Barsky and IM Lakdawala have added to the literature in this area.

GM Davies has a DVD on 1...d6.

These sources identify a fine collection of pioneers who have led the way here and it has to be comforting to know that you are in the company of those who share a similar spirit to your own about chess.

In any case, I wish you a pleasant and rewarding journey.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #34 - 12/05/11 at 20:32:04
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Thanks very much! That's a great list and lots of food for thought. I've always been quietly interested in Benko's play, but so many of his contemporaries received more attention. Definitely worth a look.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #33 - 12/05/11 at 20:08:37
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@HgMan
Quote:
Other than Larsen and Suttles, whose games should I be studying?


I'm not sure the following information will help you but its better to have info you can reject than no info at all.

In IM Jeremy Silman's book Pal Benko: My Life, Games and Compositions, IM John Watson has done Part 3 of this book (approx 130 pages) called Pal Benko's Creativity, an Opening Survey. I might be worth your time to thumb through this book beginning at page 435 to see if anything catches your attention. IM Watson explores GM Benko's White and Black repertoire.

Maybe you can get some leads about who to investigate by buying Neil MacDonald's Starting Out: the Reti, since it is the core of GM Keene's book. It's probably the most up-to-date overview of the Reti these days. The last chapter on how to deal with avoidance of the Reti might narrow your search.

In any case, the labyrinth of transpositions in this repertoire should give you some of that chameleon effect. And since you won't be too far from your Catalan, this may be the element you may really be looking for these days.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #32 - 12/04/11 at 21:50:10
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HgMan wrote on 12/04/11 at 21:46:02:
But I should just get over this and study the openings more carefully.

Before you get over it: is 1.g3 really offbeat? Isn't it White's best option to transpose to all kind of well known stuff like the English, the KIA and indeed the (Neo-)Catalan?
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #31 - 12/04/11 at 21:46:02
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Yes: I think this is very much in the spirit of what I'm looking for. Something offbeat but flexible. Designed to take Black out of his/her comfort zone while confounding chess engine evaluations at the same time. I'm building a Black repertoire around much of Suttles's games. Finding an appropriate avenue as White is taking a bit more work.

I suspect my lone reluctance toward 1.g3 is that I have been playing the Catalan for quite some time and would like a change away from the bishop on g2—and I don't like the idea of inviting 1...e5. But I should just get over this and study the openings more carefully.
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #30 - 12/04/11 at 19:00:58
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In particular, the Benko - Larsen Opening (1.g3) has resurfaced with Chess on the Edge (Vols 1,2,3) and the DVD by Nigel Davies on 1.g3.

This stuff may be just old enough to be fresh again.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #29 - 12/04/11 at 18:44:15
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@HgMan
In the remote possibility that you have not looked closely at Flank Openings by GM Keene; are his 'old' repertoire suggestions worthy of a closer inspection now? This was the case for a young Neil MacDonald.

http://www.amazon.ca/Flank-Openings-Opening-Catalan-English/dp/4871878457/ref=sr...
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #28 - 12/03/11 at 20:54:38
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Malaniuk is right, of course.

Theoretically it would seem so easy to drop a tempo, but practically you always end up losing two...
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #27 - 12/03/11 at 10:59:27
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fling wrote on 12/03/11 at 08:43:05:
Smyslov_Fan wrote on 12/03/11 at 01:23:52:
Malaniuk always came to my mind when thinking of 1.f4. I know that Nakamura has played a bunch of blitz games on ICC using .f4, perhaps some of his early games could be useful too?


Wasn't it Malaniuk that didn't want to play 1.f4, despite playing 1.d4 f5 as Black, because the extra tempo was gonna hurt him (was it in Pedersen's book)? Or was it somebody else?

(Sorry, my memory has gone bad, and I sold the book)


I had the same recollection, and now supported by google:

Quote:
GM Alex Yermolinsky likewise notes that GM Vladimir Malaniuk, a successful exponent of the Leningrad Dutch (1.d4 f5 2.g3 g6) at the highest levels "once made a deep impression on me by casually dismissing someone's suggestion that he should try 1.f4 as White. He smiled and said, 'That extra move's gonna hurt me.' "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First-move_advantage_in_chess


Btw, here's the game I mentioned
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #26 - 12/03/11 at 08:43:05
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 12/03/11 at 01:23:52:
Malaniuk always came to my mind when thinking of 1.f4. I know that Nakamura has played a bunch of blitz games on ICC using .f4, perhaps some of his early games could be useful too?


Wasn't it Malaniuk that didn't want to play 1.f4, despite playing 1.d4 f5 as Black, because the extra tempo was gonna hurt him (was it in Pedersen's book)? Or was it somebody else?

(Sorry, my memory has gone bad, and I sold the book)
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #25 - 12/03/11 at 01:23:52
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Malaniuk always came to my mind when thinking of 1.f4. I know that Nakamura has played a bunch of blitz games on ICC using .f4, perhaps some of his early games could be useful too?
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #24 - 12/03/11 at 00:41:53
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HgMan wrote on 12/02/11 at 23:23:59:
I must admit, the From really doesn't bother or interest me much. Other than Larsen and Suttles, whose games should I be studying?


Swedish GM Lars Karlsson plays 1.f4 occasionally (along with most other white Flank Openings). I remember that he was white in a From vs Ahlander in one of the last three rounds of Elitserien earlier this year - it looked quite interesting for White when I walked by, but apparently it ended in a draw.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #23 - 12/02/11 at 23:23:59
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I must admit, the From really doesn't bother or interest me much. Other than Larsen and Suttles, whose games should I be studying?
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #22 - 12/02/11 at 15:15:10
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About From gambit I have neither played or looked at theory for many many years. When I was young I did play it in some games with a good score but it was not against very strong players.
Today I prefere other more practical lines.

The last time I played the From however was at local club about 10 years ago. I was about to meet the competitions 2nd highest rated player. He knew that I played Dutch as black so he played 1 f4 instead of hes usuall 1 d4. After some minutes thought I then decided to play the From. Then he declined it with 2 e4 leeding to Kings Gambit who also at that time was my white preference after e4 e5, a fact that the opponnet knew as well. I accepted the pawn and after many complications I got a won endgame but mayed a mistake and my opponnent, who is an endgame expert, managed to draw.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #21 - 12/02/11 at 12:36:33
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Looking at various Philidor/Modern/Lion/Old Indian kinds of ideas for Black, perhaps the way to begin is with 1.d3, which can revert to Bird or some White variant of the above. Still, I can't help thinking that 1.f4 is optically more appealing than the sheepish 1.d3... Undecided
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #20 - 12/02/11 at 12:33:56
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MNb wrote on 12/02/11 at 10:17:48:
Before trying the Classical Bird you better take a serious look at my game against David Flude.

I remember thinking at the time that White launched his pawns a bit prematurely—that maintaining tension while developing the queenside further might have been to his benefit. But I'll be sure to take a more careful look.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #19 - 12/02/11 at 12:19:44
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If everyone played the From I'd always play 1.f4 - unfortunately they don't, and despite having played the Dutch for decades I don't feel comfortable playing 1.f4, probably due to the lack of advantage.

Though I still punt it in blitz occasionally - but then you only suffer for a few minutes if things go wrong. I'd never play it in corr, and certainly not in a corr tm - it would be like playing tennis and never get to serve for the duration of the match...
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #18 - 12/02/11 at 10:21:54
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Judging by the latest analysis in Kaissiber, From's Gambit is probably just slightly better for White with accurate play after 1.f4 e5 2.fxe5 d6 3.exd6 Bxd6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Nc3!, while 4...g5 (frowned upon in Taylor's book) probably also concedes just a small edge after 5.d4 g4 6.Ne5 Bxe5 (unfortunately 6...Qe7 and 6...Qf6 don't quite work) 7.dxe5 Qxd1+ etc and 5.g3 g4 6.Nh4 Ne7 7.d4 Ng6 8.Nxg6 hxg6 9.Qd3 etc.   There was a recent GM-level game in the latter line.  Thus objectively it is a bit sub-optimal, albeit dangerous for unprepared Whites, but certainly not a point-cashing machine for White.

The Neo-From (2...Nc6) is poor for Black after 3.Nf3 g5 4.h3! according to the Kaissiber analysis, and there is a convincing case by analogy with the sub-optimal Staunton line 1.d4 f5 2.e4 fxe4 3.g4?! h6!, so Black does best to duck back into the 2...d6 lines anyway with 3...d6.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #17 - 12/02/11 at 10:17:48
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HgMan wrote on 12/02/11 at 02:09:52:
This is preparation for a Master Norm tournament on ICCF and the upcoming Canadian Championships.

Before trying the Classical Bird you better take a serious look at my game against David Flude.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #16 - 12/02/11 at 10:01:39
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nyoke wrote on 12/01/11 at 09:39:50:
The only problem with the bird is the main line, really. The From is just a point cashing machine for white, and there are good antisicilians available.


Things are rarely that simply in practical play. Last season a strong Bird specialist at local club lost to a much much lower rated player in From Gambit. However there are no doubt improvments along the way, that games protocall was never published.

About mainline, when a other player at local club playes Leningrad Bird and when I play mainline but develops the Knight to h6 the games tend to always becames a draw. When we play other openings the game raraly becomes a draw.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #15 - 12/02/11 at 02:09:52
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This is preparation for a Master Norm tournament on ICCF and the upcoming Canadian Championships. I don't know if I can—in good conscience—trot out 1.c3. But maybe I can. Or maybe I can try both and see how things go.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #14 - 12/02/11 at 01:43:49
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 12/01/11 at 18:28:30:
The amorphous nature of 1.Nc3 makes playing against those openings much more challenging.

Curious indeed. Haven't we had this before? Tell me what you play against 1.e4 and I'll tell you what to play against 1.Nc3.
I'd even say that 1.Nc3 is more rigid than 1.e4, exactly because White can't play c2-c3 or c2-c4 anymore.

Open Games: 1.Nc3 Nf6.
Sicilian: 1.Nc3 c5, though there remain some move order tricks a little later.
Caro-Kann: 1.Nc3 d5 2.e4 c6.
French: 1.Nc3 d5 2.e4 e6.
Pirc/Modern: 1.Nc3 g6.
Scandinavian/Alekhine: 1.Nc3 d5 2.e4 Nf6 or 2...dxe4 3.Nxe4 Nd7.

Not that I would ever play 1.f4 in corr. chess.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #13 - 12/01/11 at 22:02:35
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Curious. The few times I've run into 1.Nc3, they've invariably turned into standard French, Pirc, or Caro lines, depending on which pawn I pushed forward. Which struck me as disappointing. Maybe I should look at it from my point of view as White. While arguably more flexible, 1.c3 just looks so wrong...
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #12 - 12/01/11 at 18:28:30
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Good to see you again, HgMan!

I'm more likely to play 1.c3 than I am 1.f4. In correspondence, I've found 1.Nc3 to be vexsome, but 1.f4 has been rather toothless in my (somewhat limited) experience. Black has too many ways to reach a fully playable game after 1.f4. The amorphous nature of 1.c3 and 1.Nc3 makes playing against those openings much more challenging.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #11 - 12/01/11 at 13:30:37
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The added temptation, of course, is to think about something like 1.c3.

http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1106166460/0
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #10 - 12/01/11 at 09:39:50
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Interesting thread; me too have been looking to brew something out of reversed classical, antoshin and larsen, but I'm afraid MNB is right. (You should be able to drop a tempo before making the committing pwan move.

Something else I have been trying lately is the Golovankov variation : a reversed clarendon court. Lots of fun, but = from the start, of course.

The only problem with the bird is the main line, really. The From is just a point cashing machine for white, and there are good antisicilians available.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #9 - 12/01/11 at 03:28:45
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1.f4 was just a starting point, based on having some experience with it. I came across the attached game the other evening—played five or six years ago. It's far from perfect, but I liked White's general play and the coordination of my pieces. It's also wonderfully chaotic. So that was my starting point. I've played better games—sounder, more convincing ones—but I feel like I'm in a rut of playing safe openings and safe moves rather than just stirring up the pot.

1.f4 may be committal, but I do have some familiarity, and I think there's room for experimentation. I'll likely move quickly from there. By way of comparison, I'm trying to put together some kind of Modern/Pirc/Rat complex for Black. Maybe, then, 1.g3 would be a better starting point, but I think I'll start with 1.f4.
  

Bird_Game.pgn ( 0 KB | 278 Downloads )

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #8 - 12/01/11 at 03:07:47
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TalJechin wrote on 11/30/11 at 23:10:57:
Why choose the committal 1.f4 if the above is your goal? 1.d3, 1.g3 or even the rare 1.e3 could lead to completely fresh positions, as well as a reversed Dutch, French, Alekhine etc, while still offering alternative major set-ups like going into the English, KIA or Catalan when appropriate and allowed.

The first impression is that White can head for the Bird via 1.b3, 1.e3 or 1.g3 and avoid the From's Gambit of course. I'm not so sure if that's a good reason though. In a Kaissiber article it was argued that White has fine prospects of an advantage after 1.f4 e5 2.fxe5 d6 3.exd6 Bxd6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Nc3. This is also an idea of GM Larsen.
Moreover, 1.e3 Nc6 2.f4 e5 is also a kind of From's Gambit. So is 1.b3 Nf6 2.Bb2 d6 3.f4 e5.
1.g3 e5 leads to all kind of transpositions, many of them not so fresh anymore.

Possibly 1.e3 e5 2.c4, 1.e3 Nc6 2.c4 combined with 1.e3 d5 2.f4 makes a nice repertoire; I'm not sure of 1.e3 Nf6 and 1.e3 c5 though.

So I still think it's simplest to allow the From and combine the Leningrad Bird/Polar Bear with the Big Clamp against the Sicilian: 1.f4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.O-O and if Black refuses to play ...d5 then e2-e4 postponing Nc3. A Dutch friend of mine (ELO 2100) scored 4½/6 with this.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #7 - 12/01/11 at 01:35:46
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Didn't GM Danielson have an online site featuring the Polar Bear and wasn't this followed up by Vigus in Dangerous Weapons:Flank Openings? Both promote the Leningrad Reversed. Vigus also looked at the From.

The closest the Odessky book gets to the Bird Opening is Nimzowitsch Attack. The overlap with the Bird Opening is significant and Odessky's analysis should not be overlooked imo.

Birdbase by Sid Pickard should also be in a serious Bird player's library imo.

I also think that IM Taylor's book should be read in the company of other sources. GM Larsen disagreed with Taylor's fundamental opening approach for instance.

Kaissiber has some magazines on the From Gambit.

Oleinikov has a CD on the Bird Opening as well.

GM Larsen was not above playing 1.b4 in addition to 1.f4 and there are two books published on this opening as well.

You can get Bird positions beginning with 1.Nf3 so how could this be used?

Maybe you just want to play 1.f4 but I think there are layers of thinking to add to this idea.

Maybe you just have to start with 1.f4, prepare for the From, and develop more sophistication from there.

I wonder what other serious Bird players think about this. Undecided

I don't think it's helpful or really useful to hear from those who think the Bird is not worth a player's time. If the positions were good enough for GMs Larsen and Nimzowitsch they are good enough for most chess players.


  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #6 - 11/30/11 at 23:10:57
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Quote:
My primary interest is in acquiring complicated positions, free of theory, where strategic planning and a better understanding of the position's latent energy will allow me to dictate the rules of engagement.


Why choose the committal 1.f4 if the above is your goal? 1.d3, 1.g3 or even the rare 1.e3 could lead to completely fresh positions, as well as a reversed Dutch, French, Alekhine etc, while still offering alternative major set-ups like going into the English, KIA or Catalan when appropriate and allowed.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #5 - 11/30/11 at 13:27:55
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Thanks for the kind words, Bibs & MNb.

As it happens I leafed through Odessky's book in a chess shop in London a couple of years ago and decided that it was charmingly bonkers and not worth the purchase; maybe it's worth revisiting that.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #4 - 11/30/11 at 12:35:23
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bragesjo wrote on 11/29/11 at 20:47:59:
If you play Bird, be prepare to study closed sicilian too since black can force a transposing to closed sicilian since black can play 1 .. c5 and play the moves Nf6 g6 Bg7 0-0 d6  in some order when whites best is to move epawn to e4 at some point. A few years ago at local club I played c5 as black can I played the position like it was a closed sicilian and my higher rated opponent played like it was a reversed classical dutch where he got in the move e4 and placed Bishop at e2 instead of the standard g2 square and I managed to win after mutal mistakes.


@Bragesjo
You may like to look at Kindermann's Dutch Leningrad book.
A very practical anti-English weapon there which works a treat against auto-pilot Sicilian/English fianchetto moves.
Key- no e4.

For such a Leningrad Bird repertoire: Kindermann, plus Danielsen's vids.

@HgMan
Good to have you back, certainly.
I suggest Odessky's 1.b3 book.
He is high-energy, charmingly bonkers, unusually literate for a chess writer, puts real energy into his books. An instructive read, ask Santa.
  
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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #3 - 11/30/11 at 02:56:52
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@bragesjo: I guess there are some overlaps in terms of ideas between the Antoshin and the Closed Sicilian, but I suspect I'd prefer to put my bishop on e2 rather than g2, which seems to be the norm in the Sicilian. In addition, a pawn on c3 alters the pawn structure a bit. You're right, though, that attacking ideas might well spring from the Closed Sicilian.

@MNb: True enough. I spent the weekend going over some old games, and I saw lots of interesting positions, which I have long since weened out of my play. I'd like to revisit dynamism and flexibility as central themes in my chess, but want to do so without the burden of extensive theory (this is all through correspondence chess, of course).
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #2 - 11/29/11 at 22:00:37
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Nice to have you back - I have missed you.

HgMan wrote on 11/29/11 at 17:13:06:
are they thematically consistent with the Classical, or am I trying to marry apples and oranges?

I'm afraid the latter. That should not prevent you to incorporate all three in an opening system: flexibility and such things.
The main problem I have with these three is not so much Black playing ambitiously. Thus White will have chances too. That includes lines in which the position gets open early.
My problem is Black playing unambitiously and still rock solid. Though I have little experience I feel that it is quite hard to create enough imbalances.
Sample lines: Schlechter's Variation 1.f4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 c6 4.b3 Bg4 5.Be2 e6 6.Bb2 Bd6 7.O-O O-O 8.Ne5 Bxe2 9.Qxe2 Nbd7 10.c4 Qe7.
If White avoids this with 4.Be2 Black still can try Bg4 as 5.h3 Bxf3 6.Bxf3 Nbd7 7.O-O e5 is equally solid.

Like Bragesjo pointed out there is also the Sicilian approach. You should remember my game against David Flude (I miss him too): 1.f4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.e4 e6 4.d3 g6 5.Be2 Bg7 6.O-O Nge7 7.c3 O-O 8.Be3 d6. Although the game ended in a draw David wrote it made him give up the Bird. Of course White may try 3.e3 but it can be hard to activate the King's Bishop. Compare the English: 1.c4 f5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.g3 e6 4.Bg2 Be7 5.d3 O-O 6.e4 fxe4 7.dxe4 Nc6 8.h3 when Williams advises to lose a tempo with Bc5.

Because of such considerations I have concluded that White's only ambitious setup is the Leningrad Reversed, aka the Polar Bear.
  

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Re: Bird Repertoire
Reply #1 - 11/29/11 at 20:47:59
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If you play Bird, be prepare to study closed sicilian too since black can force a transposing to closed sicilian since black can play 1 .. c5 and play the moves Nf6 g6 Bg7 0-0 d6  in some order when whites best is to move epawn to e4 at some point. A few years ago at local club I played c5 as black can I played the position like it was a closed sicilian and my higher rated opponent played like it was a reversed classical dutch where he got in the move e4 and placed Bishop at e2 instead of the standard g2 square and I managed to win after mutal mistakes.
  
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Bird Repertoire
11/29/11 at 17:13:06
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I've recently returned to Bird's Opening as a means of achieving positions less scrutinized by theory. Previously, this involved preparing a line against the From and hacking away at the Classical Bird with 7.a4 or 7.Qe1 and 8.a4 (1.f4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 g6 4.Be2 Bg7 5.0-0 0-0 6.d3 c5 7.a4) without much plan beyond that.

My return to Bird's stems from study of impressive wins (not Bird-related). My primary interest is in acquiring complicated positions, free of theory, where strategic planning and a better understanding of the position's latent energy will allow me to dictate the rules of engagement.

I'd like to develop a more sophisticated opening system around the Classical, the Antoshin, and the Bird-Larsen. My interest in studying all three has less to do with move-order concerns (though that might have some bearing) and more to do with variety and the potential for over-lapping themes. I have little experience with the latter two: are they thematically consistent with the Classical, or am I trying to marry apples and oranges?

Further, I appreciate that I have an opponent on the other side of the board whose job it is to make my life miserable, but can I expect/endeavor to generate closed positions through these three options—and are there any lines I should be looking to avoid (From excepted, of course) if I would prefer not to open the game at too early a stage?

Caveats:
1. I know that 1.f4 isn't White's best option. I know that many of these positions will yield little or no advantage to White out of the opening.

2. The more I look at it, the more I strongly dislike Taylor's book. It seems high on rhetoric and low on in-depth analysis. Lazy, in many respects.
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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