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Normal Topic b-pawn (Read 5648 times)
proustiskeen
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Re: b-pawn
Reply #3 - 04/06/14 at 23:16:02
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A pgn of Poghosyan's analysis.
  

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Poghosyan V
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Re: b-pawn
Reply #2 - 04/06/14 at 12:11:16
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Before proceeding with the part 2 of the analysis of 4 vers 3 rook endings with a “b”-pawn I would like to draw attention here to the wrong evaluation of the ending Portisch-Petrosian (1974) in the new edition of ECE II. I will give a detailed analysis of this important endgame later on in this thread. Here I want to point out that the position n. 1736 (which arose after Petrosian`s move 55…Rf2?) is lost for Black. I analysed this position 2011 and reported the results to M. Dvoretsky because some key positions of that game are misanalised in his manual.

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ECE claims a draw after 1.Ra8 Rb2 2.Kc5 Rc2 3.Kb5 Rb2 4.Kc6 Rc2, but after 4.Ka6 Blacks position is lost (as shown in the attached file). It is fair to say that the move 4.Ka6 was first indicated by GM John Nunn in his excellent Understanding Chess Endgames, 2009, p. 131.
  

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Poghosyan
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Re: b-pawn
Reply #1 - 01/06/12 at 16:14:10
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Despite the new possibilities for Black to draw easier than in the game Hollis-Florian, some lines of the variation 40.Kf1 Rb2 41.Ke1 Kf6 42.f3 Rb3 43.Kd2 Ke6 are important also in the situations when the White king has access to the 3. rank.

D. 1

Spassky,Boris V - Antoshin,Vladimir S
Sochi Chigorin Memorial 03rd Sochi (7), 1965

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Spassky played 46.Kd4 and went on to win easily: 46...Rxf2 (46...Kf6 47.Kd5 Rxf2 48.Rc7 Kantorovich) 48...Rd2+ 49.Kc6 Rd3 50.b6 Rxg3 51.b7 Rc3+ 52.Kd7 Rb3 53.Rc6+ Kf5 54.Kc7 Rxb7+ 55.Kxb7) 47.Re7 Rb2 48.Kc4 Kf6 49.Re3 Kf5 50.Rb3 Rc2+ 51.Kd5 Kg4 52.b6 Rc8 53.b7 Rb8 54.Ke5 f5 55.Kf6 f4 56.gxf4 Kxh4 57.Kxg6 Kg4 58.f5 h4 59.f6 h3 60.f7 h2 61.Rb1 Rxb7 62.Rxb7 h1Q 63.Rb4+ Kh3 64.f8Q Qg2+ 65.Kh7 Qc2+ 66.Kh8 Qc3+ 67.Kg8 Qg3+ 68.Qg7 1–0 We will take a closer look on that game later.

46.Kd4 is without doubt the best move in the position of the diagram. But the more cautious 1.b6? does not throw away the win, despite the opinion of Kantorovich. After 1…Kf6 we reach the Kantorovich position with a b-pawn.

D. 2

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With an a-pawn the position is drawn (even White to play), but here White to move wins.

1.Kd4 Ke6

a) 1…g5 which draws in the analogous position with an a-pawn does not help here:

2.hxg5+ Kxg5 3.Rb8 Kf5 (3...Kg4 4.Kc5 Kf3 5.Rh8 Kxf2 6.Rxh5 Kxg3 7.Kc6 or 7.Rf5+-)  4.f3 Ke6 (4...f6 5.b7 Rb4+ 6.Kc3 Rb1 7.g4+ hg4 8.fg4+ Kf4 9.g5 +-) 5.Kc5 Rc2+ 6.Kb5 Rb2+ 7.Kc6 Rc2+ 8.Kb7 Rf2 9.Re8+ Kd7 10.Re3 f5 11.Rd3+ Ke7 12.Ra3+-.

b) 1...Rxf2 2.Rc7 g5 3.b7 Rb2 4.Kc5 Rc2+ (4...gxh4 5.Rc6++-) 5.Kd6 Rd2+ 6.Kc6 Rc2+ 7.Kd7 Rb2 8.Kc8 gxh4 9.gxh4 Kf5 10.Rc4+-.

In the game Feletar-Zelic (CRO-chT Makarska Tucepi, 1995) Black played 2(51…) Rb2 instead of 2...g5. White won easily: 52.b7 Kf5 53.Rxf7+ (53.Kc4 Rc2+ (53...Kg4 54.Kc3) 54.Kd5 Rxc7 55.b8Q Rd7+ 56.Kc5 Kf6 57.Kc6 Ke7 58.Qe5+ Kd8 59.g4+-) 53...Kg4 (53...Ke6 54.Rg7 Kd6 (54...Kf6 55.Rh7 Kf5 56.Rc7 Kg4 57.Kc3+-) 55.Rxg6+ Kc7 56.Rg5+-) 54.Kc3 Rb6 55.Rg7 (55.Rf4+ Kxg3 56.Rb4 Rxb7 57.Rxb7 Kxh4 58.Kd3+-) 55...Kh3 56.Kd4 g5 57.hxg5 Kxg3 58.g6 1–0.

2.Kc5

2.f3 transpose to the main line and is more cautious since the pawn on f2 is not so much exposed as in the main line. 2...Rb5 (2...Rd2+ 3.Kc3 Rd6 4.Kc4 f6 5.Kb5 Rd3 6.Rg7 Kd6 7.Kc4 Rd1 8.Rxg6+-. 2...Rb1 3.g4 Rd1+ transposes to the main line after 10...Rd1+) 3.Kc4 Rb1 4.g4.

2...Rc2+

2...Rxf2 3.Ra7 Rc2+ 4.Kb5 Rb2+ 5.Kc6 Rc2+ (5...f6 6.b7 g5 7.Ra6+-) 6.Kb7 Rc3 7.Ra5 Rxg3 8.Ka7 Rb3 9.b7. 

3.Kb4 Rb2+

White wins also after 3...Rxf2 4.Rc7 Rb2+ (4...Kd6 5.Rc3 f6 6.Kb5 Rb2+ 7.Ka6 Ra2+ 8.Kb7 g5 9.Kb8 gxh4 10.gxh4 Ra4 11.Rh3 f5 12.b7+-) 5.Ka5 Rb3 6.Ka6:

D. 3

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a) 6...Ra3+ 7.Kb7 g5 8.Rc5 Rxg3 (8...gxh4 9.gxh4 Kd6 10.Rxh5+-) 9.Ka6 Kd7 10.Rxg5 Rf3 11.Kb7 Rb3 12.Rxh5 Rb4 13.Ka7 Ra4+ 14.Kb8 f5 15.b7 f4 16.Rh7+ Kd6 17.Kc8 Rc4+ 18.Kd8 Rb4 19.Rh6+ Ke5 20.Kc7+-

b) 6...Rxg3 7.b7 Ra3+ 8.Kb6 Rb3+ 9.Ka7 Ra3+ (9...f6 10.Rc5 Kd6 11.Rc3 Rxc3 12.b8Q+) 10.Kb8 f6 11.Kc8 Rb3 12.Rc5 Kd6 13.Ra5 Rc3+ 14.Kb8 Rb3 15.Ka8 Kc7 16.Rc5+ Kd6 17.Rc3 Rb4 (17...Rxc3 18.b8Q+) 18.b8Q+ Rxb8+ 19.Kxb8 g5 20.Kb7 Kd5 21.Kb6 Ke4 22.Kc6 Kf4 23.Kd5 gxh4 24.Kd4!+-. 

4.Kc3 Rb1

4…Rf2 also loses. After 5.Rc7 Rf1 6.b7 Rb1 7.Kc4 White wins as proved by Micawber.

5.Rb8 Kd6

D. 4

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Kantorovich claims the position as drawn because Black has managed to prevent the king`s advance towards its pawn. Dvoretsky and Kasparov share his opinion.

5...Rb5 is weaker because the king advances along the c-file: 6.Kc4 Rb2 7.Kc5 Rxf2 (7...Rc2+ 8.Kb5 Rxf2 9.Ra8 Rb2+ 10.Kc6 Rc2+ 11.Kb7 Rc3 12.Kb8 Rxg3 13.b7 Rc3 14.Ra5 Rb3 15.Ka7+-) 8.b7 +- .

6.Kc4 Rb2

Grabbing the b6-pawn loses faster: 6...Kc6 7.Rf8 Rxb6 8.Rxf7 Rb2 9.f4 Rf2 10.Rf6+ Kd7 11.Rxg6+-.

7.f3 Rb1 8.Rb7 Ke6 9.g4

D. 5

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A key position which is very important for the evaluation of the whole line. Despite its appearance it is no fortress. We have already seen the analogous position with the rook on b2 which was lost for Black (see the line I. B1) 46...Kd6 47.Kc4 Rb2 48.Rb7 in  http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1321345446). Here the black rook is in a more favourable position and this gives Black more defensive resources.    

I. A. 9...Rc1+ 10.Kd4 Rd1+ 11.Kc3 Rb1

D. 6

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12.g5 Kd5

a) 12...Rc1+ 13.Kb2 Rc5 14.Kb3 Rb5+ (14...Rc1 15.Rb8 Kf5 16.Kb4 Kf4 17.Rd8 Rb1+ 18.Ka5+-) 15.Ka4 Rb1 16.Rb8 f6 17.gxf6 Kxf6 18.Ka5 g5 19.hxg5+ Kxg5 20.b7 Kh4 21.Ka6 Ra1+ 22.Kb6 Rb1+ 23.Kc6 Rc1+ 24.Kd6 Rb1 25.Ke6 Rb6+ 26.Ke5 (26.Kd5? Kg3 27.Rg8+ Kxf3 28.b8Q Rxb8 29.Rxb8 h4=) 26...Rb5+ 27.Kd4 Rb4+ 28.Kc5 Rb1 29.f4 Rc1+ 30.Kd5 Rd1+ 31.Ke6 Re1+ 32.Kf6+-.

b) 12...f6 13.gxf6 Kxf6 14.Rb8 Kg7 15.f4 (15.Kc4? g5 16.hxg5 (16.Kc5 gxh4) 16...h4) 15...Kf7 (15...Kf6 16.Kc4) 16.Kc4 Kf6 17.Kc5+-. 

13.f4 Ke6

a) 13...Rc1+ 14.Kd3 (14.Kb2 Rc5 15.Rd7+ Ke6 16.Rd3 Rc8 17.Rb3 Rb8 18.b7 Kf5 19.Rb4 Ke6 20.Kc3 Kd5 21.Rb1 Ke4 (21...Kc5 22.Kd3 Kd5 23.f5 gxf5 24.Ke3 Ke5 25.Rb5+ Kd6 26.Kf4+-) 22.Kc4) 14...Rb1 15.f5 gxf5 16.Rxf7 Rb3+ 17.Kc2 Rxb6 18.Rxf5+ Ke4 19.Rf6 Rb8 20.Rh6+-

b) 13...Rb5 14.Rxf7 Rxb6 15.f5 gxf5 16.Rxf5+ Ke4 17.Rf6 Rb8 18.Rh6+-.

14.Kc4 Rc1+

14...Rb2 15.Rb8 Kf5 (in the main line (I.A2 19.Kc4) this position arises after 20...Rf5 with the White rook on b1 which does not matter) 16.Kc5 Kg4 17.Ra8 Kxh4 18.Ra4 Kg3 19.Rb4 Rc2+ 20.Kd6 Rc8 21.b7 Rh8 22.b8Q+-. 

15.Kd3

15.Kb3 Rf1 16.Kb4 Rxf4+ 17.Kc5 Rxh4 18.Rb8 Rh1 19.b7 Kf5 20.Ra8 Rb1 21.b8Q Rxb8 22.Rxb8 Kxg5+- 23.Kd4+-

15...Rb1

15...Rd1+ 16.Kc2 Rd4 17.Kc3 Rxf4 18.Rc7 Rf1 19.b7 Rb1 20.Kd4 f6 21.gxf6 Kxf6 22.Kc5 Ke5 23.Kc6 Kf4 24.Rg7 Rc1+ 25.Kb6 Rb1+ 26.Ka7 Ra1+ 27.Kb8 Kg4 28.Rxg6+ Kxh4 29.Kc7 Rc1+ (29...Ra7 30.Kc8+-) 30.Rc6+-

16.Kc3

16.Kc2 Rb4

16...Rc1+ 17.Kb2 Rc5

a) 17...Rc6 18.Kb3 Rc1 19.Rb8 Rb1+ (19...Kf5 20.Ka4 Kg4 21.Rf8 Rb1 22.Ka5 Kxh4 23.Rxf7 Kg4 24.Rf6 h4 25.Rxg6 Kxf4 26.Rg8+- Transposition to the main line after 26.Rg8.) 20.Kc4 Transposition to the main line after 20.Rb8.

b) 17...Rc4 18.Kb3 Rxf4 19.Rc7 Kd6 20.Rc8 Rf5 21.Kc4 Rf4+ 22.Kb5 Rf5+ 23.Ka6 Rf1 24.b7 Ra1+ 25.Kb6 Rb1+ 26.Ka7 Ra1+ 27.Kb8 Ra4 28.Rc7 Rxh4 29.Kc8 Rb4 30.b8Q Rxb8+ 31.Kxb8 Ke6 32.Rc5 Kd6 33.Ra5+-

18.Kb3 Rb5+

D. 7

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Now White has a choice between 19.Ka4 and 19.Kc4.

I.A1) 19.Ka4 Rb1 20.Rb8 Kf5 21.Ka5 Kg4


D. 8

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a) 22.Rc8? throws away the win.

22…Kxh4

Not 22...Ra1+ 23.Kb5 Rb1+ 24.Kc6 Rc1+ 25.Kb7+-

23.Rc4 Kg4 24.Rb4 Ra1+ 25.Kb5 Ra8 26.b7

26.Kc6 h4 27.b7 Rb8 28.Kc7 transposes to the 28. move.

26...Rb8 27.Kb6 h4 28.Kc7 Re8 29.b8Q

a) 29.f5+ Kxg5 30.f6 Kxf6 31.Rxh4 Re7+ 32.Kc6 Rxb7 33.Kxb7=;
b) 29.Kd6 Rb8 30.Ke7 h3;
c) 29.Ra4 h3 30.Ra8 Re7+ 31.Kc6 Rxb7 32.Kxb7 Kxf4

29...Rxb8 30.Kxb8 h3 31.Kc7 h2 32.Rb1 Kxf4=.

b) 22.Rb7 secures a winning position.

22…Kxh4

22...Ra1+ 23.Kb5 Rb1+ 24.Kc6 Rc1+ 25.Kd6 Rb1 26.Ke7 Kxf4 27.Kxf7 Kf5 28.Kg7 Rb5 29.Rf7+ Kg4 30.Kxg6 Rxb6+ 31.Rf6 Rb4 32.Kh6+-

23.Rxf7 Kg4

a) 23...Ra1+ 24.Kb5 Rb1+ 25.Kc6 Rc1+ 26.Kd7 Rb1 27.Kc7 Rc1+ 28.Kd8 Rd1+ 29.Kc8 Rc1+ 30.Rc7+-. 
b) 23...Rb2 24.Rg7 Kg4 25.Rxg6 Kxf4 26.Rg8+- Kf5 27.g6 h4 28.g7 Kg6 29.Rh8 Kxg7 30.Rxh4+-.

24.Rf6 h4

24...Rb2 25.Rxg6 Kxf4 26.Rg8+-.

25.Rxg6 Kxf4 26.Rg8 Kf5

26…Ra1+ 27.Kb5 Rb1+ 28.Kc6 Rc1+ 29.Kb7 Rh1 30.Kc7 Rc1+ 31.Kb8+-.

27.g6 h3 28.g7 Kg6 29.Rh8 Kxg7 30.Rxh3+-

[url]c) 22.Rf8[/url] also wins for White.

22…Ra1+ 23.Kb5 Rb1+ 24.Kc6 Rc1+ 25.Kd7 Rb1 26.Kc7 Rc1+ 27.Kb8 Kxh4 28.Rxf7 Kg4 29.Rf6 h4 30.Rxg6 h3 31.Rh6 Kxf4 32.Rxh3+-.

[b]I.A2) 19.Kc4 Rb1 20.Rb8[/b]

D. 9

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20…Kf5

20...Kd6 21.b7 Kc6 (21...Rc1+ 22.Kd3 Rb1 23.Rd8+ Kc7 24.Rf8 Kxb7 25.Rxf7+ Kc6 26.Ke4 Kd6 27.Rf6+ Ke7 28.Rxg6 Rb4+ 29.Ke3 Rb3+ 30.Ke2 Rb2+ 31.Kd3 Rh2 32.Ke4 Rxh4 33.Rg7+ Kf8 34.Rh7+-) 22.Rc8+ Kxb7 23.Rf8 Kc6 (23...Kc7 24.Rxf7+ Kd8 25.Rf6 Rf1 26.Kd5 Ke7 27.Ke4+-) 24.Rxf7 Rf1 25.Rf6+ Kd7 26.Kd4 Ke7 27.Kd3 Rd1+ 28.Ke2 Rd4 29.Ke3 Ra4 30.Rxg6 Ra3+ 31.Kd2 Ra2+ 32.Kc1 Rh2 33.f5 Rxh4 34.f6+ Ke6 35.Rg7 Rh1+ 36.Kd2 Rf1 37.Ke2 Rf5 38.Re7+ Kd6 39.Re8 Kd7 40.Rh8+-. 

21.Kc5 Kg4

21...Kxf4 22.Ra8+-.

22.Ra8 Rc1+

22...Kxh4 23.Ra4 Kg3 24.Rb4 Rc1+ 25.Kd6 Rc8 26.b7 Rh8 27.b8Q+-.

23.Kd6 Rb1 24.Kc7 Rc1+ 25.Kb8 Kxh4 26.b7 Kg3 27.Ka7 Ra1+ 28.Kb6 Rb1+ 29.Kc6 Rxb7

29...Kxf4 30.Ra4+ Kf3 31.Ra5 Rxb7 32.Kxb7 h4 33.Ra4+-.

30.Kxb7 h4

30...Kxf4 31.Ra5+-.

31.Kc6+-

I. B. 11...hxg4 12.fxg4

I. B1) 12…f5 13.gxf5+ gxf5 14.Rg7 Rc1+

14...f4 15.b7 Rb1 16.Kc2 (16.h5? f3=) 16...Rb5 17.h5 f3 18.Kd2+-.

15.Kd2 Rb1 16.h5 Kf6 17.Kc2 Rb5 18.Rg3+-

I. B2) 12...Rb1 13.h5 gxh5 14.gxh5 Rh1

D. 10

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15.Rb8! Kd7 16.Rh8 Kc6 17.Rh6+ Kb7 18.Kd4+-. 

I. C. 11...Rc1+ 12.Kb2 Rc5 13.Kb3 Rc1 14.Rb8+-.

I. D. 11...Rf1 12.Rc7 Rxf3+ 13.Kc4 Kd6 14.gxh5 gxh5 15.Rc8+-.

II. 9...hxg4 10.fxg4

D. 11

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10…Rc1+

10...f5 11.gxf5+ gxf5 (11...Kxf5 12.Kc5 Rc1+ 13.Kd6 Rd1+ 14.Kc7 Kg4 15.Ra7 Rc1+ 16.Kd8 Kxh4 17.Ra4++-) 12.Kd4 Rh1 (12...f4 13.Rb8 Kd6 14.Ke4 Rh1 15.Rh8 Kc6 16.Rh6+ Kb7 17.Kxf4+-) 13.Rb8! Kd7 (13...Rxh4+ 14.Kc5+-) 14.Rh8 Kc6 15.Rh6+ Kb7 16.Ke5 Rf1 17.h5 f4 18.Ke4 f3 19.Ke3 f2 20.Ke2 Re1+ 21.Kxf2+-.

11.Kd4 Rb1

After 11...Rd1+ White can choose between 12.Ke4 and 12.Ke3.
a) 12...Re1+ (12...Rb1 13.Rb8) 13.Kf4 Kf6 (13...Rb1 14.Rb8 Kf6 15.Ke4 Ke6 16.Kd4+- see the line below after 12.Rb8, D. 12) 14.Rb8 Rf1+ (14...Kg7 15.Rc8 Rb1 16.Rc6+-; 14...Rb1 15.Ke4 Ke6 16.Kd4+- see the line below after 12.Rb8, D. 12) 15.Ke4 Rg1 16.g5+ Ke7 17.Rc8 Rb1 18.Rc6+-.
b) 12.Ke3 Re1+ (12...Rg1 13.Rb8 Kd7 14.Kf4) 13.Kf2 Rb1 14.Rb8 Kd7 15.Ke3 Rb4 (15...Kc6 16.Kf4 Rb5) 16.Kf3 Kc6 17.Rf8+-.

12.Rb8

D. 12

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12...Kd6

12...f5 13.b7+-;
12...Rd1+ 13.Kc5 Rc1+ 14.Kb5 Rb1+ 15.Kc6 Rc1+ 16.Kb7 Ke5 17.Rh8 Kf4 18.h5 gxh5 19.gxh5+-;
12...Kd7 13.Kc5.

13.h5 gxh5 14.gxh5 Rd1+

14...Kc6 15.h6 Rh1 16.Rh8 Kxb6 17.Ke5+-.
14...Rh1 15.Rc8+-; 14...f5 15.h6+-.

15.Ke4 Re1+ 16.Kf5 Rf1+

16...Rh1 17.Kg5 Kc6 18.b7+-.

17.Kg5 Kc6 18.b7 Kc7 19.Rf8 Kxb7 20.h6+-.

This example illustrates very well the advantages of the b-pawn as compared to the a-pawn.

  

Kantorovich_with_b-pawn.pgn ( 17 KB | Downloads )
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Poghosyan
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b-pawn
01/06/12 at 15:49:13
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This topic is the continuation of the topic “Hollis-Florian - Kantorovich`s defensive method”
  
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