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Normal Topic g- and h-pawns versus a-pawn (Read 4848 times)
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Re: g- and h-pawns versus a-pawn
Reply #4 - 04/22/13 at 13:20:05
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D. 5

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This position arose in Nijboer-Vaganian, EU-ch 4th Istanbul 2003. After 46.g4 Black played 46…Ra5 and went on to lose quickly after 47.h6 Ra8 48.g5 Rh8 49.Kg3 a2 50.Rf1 Kc4 51.Ra1 Ra8 52.h7 1–0

According to L. Psakhis who annotated the game Black is lost but both he as well as Vaganian missed a study like draw. Instead of 46…Ra5? Psakhis gives the move 46…a2 and considers the position after 47.Rf1 as losing for Black. But in fact, Black can save the day!

D. 5.1

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47...Rg5!

The only move which effectively prevents h5-h6. Everything else loses: 47...Ka3? 48.h6 Rd2+ 49.Kh3 Rd7 50.g5 Rb7 51.Ra1 Rb1 52.Rxa2+ Kxa2 53.Kg4+- or 47...Rd6 48.Ra1 Kb3 49.Kh3 Kb2 50.Rxa2+ Kxa2 51.g5!+-.

a) 48.Kg3

D. 5.2

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48...Ka3!

The only move to draw. The b-file should be available for the Black rook if White decides to block the pawn with his rook.
48...Kb3? loses to 49.Ra1 Kb2 50.Rxa2+ Kxa2 51.Kf4+-.

49.h6

If 49.Ra1then 49… Rb5! (raison d'etre of 48…Ka3!) 50.h6 Rb1! 51.Rxa2+ Kxa2 52.g5 Rh1! 53.Kf4 Kb3! 54.Kf5 Kc4! 55.Kg6 Kd5!=   

49...Rg6! 50.Rh1 Kb3

Or 50...Kb4=. The Black king should leave the a-file.

51.h7

D. 5.3

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51...Rh6!

An amazing sacrifice. Despite the huge material advantage White can not avoid perpetual checks in the ensuing queen ending.   

52.Rxh6 a1Q 53.h8Q Qg1

Or 53...Qe1+=. 

54.Kf4 Qc1+ 55.Kf5 Qc2+ 56.Kg5 Qd2+ 57.Kh5 Qh2+! 58.Kg6 Qc2+! 59.Kf6

59.Kg7 Qc7+! 60.Kg8 Qc4+ 61.Kh7 Qe4+ 62.Rg6 Qh1+! 63.Kg7 Qb7+! 64.Kf6 Qf3+=.

59...Qc3+ 60.Ke6 Qc6+! 61.Ke5 Qc5+ 62.Ke4 Qc2+! 63.Kd5 Qc4+! 64.Kd6 Qa6+ 65.Ke5 Qe2+ 66.Kd4 Qc4+ 67.Ke3 Qc1+! 68.Kf3 Qf1+ 69.Kg3 Qg1+=.

b) 48.Ra1 Rxg4

48...Ka3 49.Kg3 Rb5!= transposes to the line a) after 49.Ra1Rb5!   

49.Kh3 Rg5!=.

It is obvious from the analysis above that Black could have also drawn by 46...Rg5 47.Kg3 a2! with transposition to the line a).
  

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Re: g- and h-pawns versus a-pawn
Reply #3 - 07/07/12 at 10:19:34
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D. 4

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Diaz-Zajcev 1983

In this position Black is a pawn down but he has the advantage thanks to his well advanced passed pawn. Nevertheless White can draw here without any problem. White played here 1.Rg4+ and after 1…Kb3 2.Rg3+ Kb4 3.Rg4+ draw was agreed. In his notes in Informator n. 35-164 which are reproduced also in the ECE n. 897, I. Zaycev gave 1.h4 a question mark and offered analysis indicating that 1.h4 loses. While 1.h4? indeed loses, his line leads only to draw.   

1.h4? a4?

Zaycev misses in his analysis an easy win after 1...Rxg5 2.hxg5 Kd5! 

2.Rg8 a3 3.Ra8 Kb4 4.g4 Ra5 5.Rb8+ Kc3 6.Rb1 a2 7.Ra1 Kb2 8.Rxa2+ Rxa2

D. 4.1

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a) 9.g5?

This move loses but White can draw easily by 9.h5 or 9.Kg3. 

9...Kc3+ 10.Kg3 Kd4–+. 

b) 9.h5 9.Kc3+ 10.Kg3 Kd4 11.Kf4 Rf2+ 12.Kg5=

In the line a) White lost because the g5-square was not available after 9.g5? 
  

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Re: g- and h-pawns versus a-pawn
Reply #2 - 07/01/12 at 10:53:07
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Part 3

D. 3

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Nunn in ECE, n. 892

This position could have arisen in the game Pomar-Ljubojevic 1972 (rev. fl.). According to Nunn (ECE, n. 892) Black is lost but with accurate play Black can still hold on. The White pawns are not far advanced, the Black rook is favourably placed behind the most advanced passed pawn. Black’s king is ready to support his passed pawn.    

I. 1...Kb5

1...Rh4? fails to 2.Rg8 Kb5 3.Kc3 Rh3+ (3...a4 4.Rg5++-) 4.Kd4+-.

2.Rh8

The only way to advance the rook pawn.

D. 3.1

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2…a4

The only move to draw. Black must create immediate counterplay with his passed pawn. Advancin the king loses. 2...Kb4 3.h6 (3.g5 Rh2+ 4.Kc1 a4 5.g6 Rg2 6.Rb8+ Kc3 7.Kb1 a3 8.h6+-) 3...Rh2+ 4.Kc1 a4 5.h7+-.

3.h6

D. 3.2

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This a critical position where Nunn considers only 3…Rh2+.

1) 3…Rh2+?

Black loses a valuable tempo with this move.

4.Kc3

But not 4.Kc1? a3 5.Kb1 Rh1+ 6.Ka2 Kb4 7.Rb8+ Ka4 8.Ra8+ Kb4=.

4...a3

D. 3.3

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5.g5 a2 6.Ra8 Rh5 7.Rxa2 Rxg5 8.Rh2 Rg8 9.h7 Rh8 10.Kd4+- (Nunn). 

2) 3...Kb4?

D. 3.4

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A) 4.Rb8+ Kc4 5.g5+-.

B) 4.Kc2?!

This move also wins but 4.Rb8+ is much simpler.

4… Rh2+ 5.Kd3 a3 6.Rb8+ Ka4 7.Kc4

D. 3.5

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a) 7…Ka5 8.Ra8+ Kb6 9.g5 a2 10.Rxa2 Rxa2 11.h7+-.

b) 7...Rc2+ 8.Kd5 Rh2 9.g5 a2

9...Rh5 10.Kc4+- transposes in D. 3.10 after 2.Rh8 Ka5 3.h6 a3+ 4.Kc2 Kb4? 

10.Ra8+ Kb3 11.Ke6+-.

3) 3...a3+!

The only move to draw.

a) 4.Kc2

D. 3.6

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4...Rh2+

4...Rh1? 5.g5 Kc4 6.Rc8+ Kb4 7.Ra8 Rh2+ 8.Kd3 Rh5 9.Rb8+ Ka4 10.Kc4+- transposes in D. 3.10 after 2.Rh8 Ka5 3.h6 a3+ 4.Kc2 Kb4?
4...Kb4? transposes in D. 3.10 after 2.Rh8 Ka5 3.h6 a3+ 4.Kc2 Kb4? 5.Rb8+ Kc4 6.g5 Rh1 7.Rc8+ Kb4 7.Ra8 Rh2+ 8.Kd3 Rh5 9.Rb8+ Ka4 10.Kc4.

5.Kd3

D. 3.7

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Black is a tempo ahead in comparison to the D. 3.3.

5…a2

5...Kb6 6.g5 Kb7=.

6.Ra8

D. 3.8

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6…Kb4!

Not 6…Rh6 7.Ra2+-.

7.g5 Rh3+

7...Kb3 8.Ra6 Rh3+ 9.Ke2 Kb2 (9...Rh1?!= 10.g6 Rxh6 11.g7 Rxa6 12.g8Q+ Kb4!=) 10.Rb6+ Ka3 (10...Rb3?! 11.h7 Rxb6 12.h8Q+ Kb1!=) 11.Ra6+ Kb2=.

8.Kd4 Ra3 9.Rb8+ Ka4 10.Kc4 Rc3+ 11.Kd4 Ra3 12.Kc4 Rc3+=.

b) 4.Ka2

D. 3.9

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4…Kb4 5.Rb8+ Ka4 6.g5 Rh2+ 7.Ka1 Rh1+ 8.Rb1 Rh2 9.Rg1 Kb3 10.Rg3+ Kb4 11.Rg1 Kb3 12.g6 Ra2+ 13.Kb1 Rb2+ 14.Kc1 Rc2+ 15.Kb1 Rb2+=. 

II. 1...a4

The immediate advance of the pawn move also draws.

D. 3.10

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2.Rh8 a3+

Black can draw also by advancing his king - 2...Kc5, 2…Kb5 or 2…Ka5. 2...Kb5 transposes in D. 3.1 after 2…a4.
2...Ka5 3.h6 a3+ 4.Kc2
a) 4…Rh2+ 5.Kc3 (5.Kb3 Rh3+ 6.Kc4 Kb6=) 5...Kb6 6.g5 Kb7!= 7.Rf8 a2 8.Rf1 Rh5=.
b) Not 4...Kb4? 5.Rb8+ Kc4 6.g5 Rh1 7.Rc8+ Kb4 7.Ra8 Rh2+ 8.Kd3 Rh5 9.Rb8+ Ka4 10.Kc4 Rh4+ 11.Kc3 Rh3+ 12.Kd4 Rh5 13.Ke3 Rxg5 14.h7 Rh5 15.h8Q Rxh8 16.Rxh8+-.

3.Ka2

3.Kc2 Kc5 4.Rf8 Rh2+ 5.Kb3 a2 6.Rf5+ Kb6 7.Rf1 Kc5=.

3...Kc5 4.Rb8

4.g5 Kb4=.

4...Kd6=.

  
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Re: g- and h-pawns versus a-pawn
Reply #1 - 06/24/12 at 15:55:10
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Part 2

D. 2

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Dreev-Moskalenko 1985

M. Dvoretsky analyses extensively this ending his Secrets of Endgame Technique and shows many analytical mistakes of Dreev who annotated it for the endgame section of Informator 39. According to Dvoretsky this position is won but Black has a remarkable saving idea which was overlooked by the analysts.

1.Re6+

Black easily draws after 1.Re1 a2 2.Ra1 Kd7= or 1.Re3 Rb4+ 2.Kf5 Ra4 3.h5 a2 4.Re1 a1Q 5.Rxa1 Rxa1 6.h6 Kd6 7.Kg6 Ke7 8.h7 Rh1 9.Kg7 Rg1 (Dreev).

I. 1...Kd7?

D. 2. 1

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This weak move was played in the game.

2.Ra6 a2 3.g5 Ke7 4.Kg4 Kf7 5.Kh5 Rh2 6.Ra7+ Ke6 7.Kg6 Rb2


7...Rxh4 8.Rxa2 (Dreev).

8.h5 Rb8 9.h6 Rg8+ 10.Kh5 Kf5 11.Ra5+ 1–0.

II. 1...Kb5?

D. 2.2

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Dreev and Dvoretsky consider in their analysis only this natural move but it loses. 

A) 2.Re5+?

Dvoretsky criticises this move but believes that it still wins. In fact 2.Re5+ is a result-changing mistake. White wins by 2.Re1 (B) suggested by Dvoretsky.

1) 2...Kb4

D. 2.3

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a) 3.Re8

Suggested by Dreev but Dvorestsky`s move 3.Re1 (b) also fails to win.

3...a2

This move of Dvoretsky secures the draw. Dreev considered only 3...Kb5? 4.Rb8+ followed by 5.Ra8.

4.Rb8+

If 4.Ra8 then 4…Rc2 with the threat of 5…Rc4+, 6…Rc5(c3)+ and 7…Ra5(a3) =. 

4…Kc4

This position arises also in the line 1…Kc5! 2.Ra6 a2 3.Ra8 Kb5 4.Rb8+ Kc4.

5.Ra8 Rb4 6.Rxa2 Kb3+ 7.Kf5 Kxa2 8.h5 Rb5+! 9.Kg6 Rb6+ 10.Kg5 Rb5+ 11.Kh4 Rb1 12.h6

12.g5 Kb3 13.g6 Rg1. 

12...Rh1+ 13.Kg5 Kb3 14.Kg6 Kc4 15.g5 Kd5 16.Kh7 Ke6 17.g6 Rg1= (Dvoretsky). 

b) 3.Re1 a2 4.Ra1

D. 2.4

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4...Ka3!

The only move to draw. Dvoretsky considers only 4…Kb3 which loses to 5.h5 Rb1 6.Rxa2 Kxa2 7.g5 Rh1 (7...Rf1+ 8.Kg4 Kb3 9.g6) 8.g6.

5.g5 Rb4+ 6.Kf5 Rxh4 7.g6 Rh2=.

2) 2...Kb6?

D. 2.5

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The line of Dreev.

3.Re3?

3.Re1 wins easily analogous to the line II. B (1.Re6+ Kb5 2.Re1).

3...Rb4+?

Dvoretsky does not comment on this move which throws away the draw.  3...a2! was correct - 4.Ra3 Kb5 5.h5 Rb4+ 6.Kf5 Ra4 7.Rxa2 Rxa2=)

D. 2.6

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4.Kf5?

Another result-changing error missed both by Dreev and Dvoretsky.
White wins by 4.Kg3+- Ra4 (4...a2 5.Ra3 Rb2 6.g5 Kc5 7.Kg4 Kb4 8.Ra8+-) 5.Re1 a2 6.Ra1 Kc5 7.h5 Kd6 8.h6+-. 

4...Ra4?

Another error of Dreev. Dvoretsky points rightly out that Black could have drawn by 4...a2 5.Ra3 Rb5+ 6.Kg6 Ra5 7.Rxa2 Rxa2 8.h5 Kc6=.

5.h5?

Instead of 5.h5? White wins by 5.Re1! a2 6.Ra1 Kc7 7.h5 Kd7 8.h6+-(Dvoretsky).

5...a2 6.Re1 a1Q 7.Rxa1 Rxa1 8.h6 Kc7 9.g5 Rh1

The main line of Dreev was 9…Kd7? 10.h7 Rh1 11.g6+-.

10.g6

10.Kg6 Kd7 11.Kh7 Ke6 12.g6 Rg1= (Dvoretsky ).

D. 2.7

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10...Rh5+!  with an easy draw (Dvoretsky).

Instead of 10…Rh5+ Dreev considered only 10...Rxh6? 11.g7 Rh5+ 12.Kf4 Rh4+ 13.Kf3 Rh3+ 14.Kg2+-.

B) 2.Re1!

After this move of Dvoretsky Black is lost.

D. 2.8

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2…a2 3.Ra1 Kc6 4.h5 Kd6 5.h6 Rh2

5...Ke6 6.h7 Rb8 7.Rxa2 Kf6 8.Rh2 Rh8 9.Rh6+ Kg7 10.Kg5+-.

6.Kg5

Or 6.h7 Rxh7 7.Rxa2 Rh8 8.Ra4 (or 8.Ra6+ Ke7 9.Kg5, but not 8.g5? Ke6 or 8.Re2? Rf8+ 9.Kg3 Rg8).

6...Ke7 7.Kg6 Kf8 8.h7+- (Dvoretsky).

III. 1...Kc5!

This move was missed by the analysts. Later on, when I had found the way to draw, I learned that Moskalenko had already shown in his book “Finales” (Barcelona 2010, p. 134) that Black could have saved the game by 1…Kc5. Black’s king keeps both the option to march to the White pawns as well as to support his passed pawn.

D. 2.9

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1) 2.Re1

This move does not win as in the line 1…Kb5? because Black heads his king to the kingside.

2...a2 3.Ra1 Kd6!=.

2) 2.Ra6 a2

D. 2.10

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3.Ra8

3.h5 fails to 3…Kb5 and White has to give up his rook because of the threat of interposition (4…Rb4+ and 5…Ra4) - 4.Rxa2 Rxa2=.
Moskalenko considers 3.Kf5 and 3.g5. 
a) 3.Kf5 Kb5 4.Ra3 Kb4 5.Ra8 Rc2=. 
b) 3.g5 Kb5 4.Ra3 Rb4+ 5.Kf5 Ra4 6.Rxa2 Rxa2=. 

3...Kb5 4.Kf5

4.Rb8+ Kc4 transposes into the line II. A1a) 1.Re6+ Kb5? 2.Re5+? Kb4 3.Re8 a2 4.Rb8+ Kc4. 

4...Kb6 5.Kg6 Kb7 6.Rxa2 Rxa2 7.h5 Kc7=.

After this analysis it should be clear that White does not obtain anything when in the initial position he plays 1.Re8.

1.Re8 a2 2.Ra8 Kb5!=.

  

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g- and h-pawns versus a-pawn
06/20/12 at 06:36:13
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Part 1

D. 1

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Lilienthal-Kan 1947 (rev. col.)

Black is a pawn down and is facing two connected passed pawns but his pieces are in relatively favourable positions. Black’s passed pawn is supported by his king and the rook is able to support his pawn both from behind as well as the side. On the other hand Whites pawns are relatively well advanced and it is difficult for Black to bring his king to the kingside to fight against the white pawns. So Black’s main plan should be to push his pawn as far as possible and force white to give up the rook for the pawn. In such a balanced position every tempo counts.

I. 1.Ke3?

Kopayev and Averbakh do not comment on this weak move which loses a vital tempo and gives Black the time she needs to push the a-pawn.

1...Kb4

D. 1.1

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1) 2.Rd5 a4 3.g4 a3 4.Rd1

4.h5 a2 5.Rd1 only transposes into the main line D. 1.2. 

4...a2 5.h5

D. 1.2

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A) 5…Rh8

This move was played in the game. 5...Ka3 (B) also draws but not 5...Rf6? (C).

a) 6.Ra1

“Since Black will have to sacrifice his rook for the h-pawn, this move, allowing White to gain a tempo, should not have been played” (Kopayev).

6…Kb3 7.Kf4 Kb2 8.Rh1 Rc8 9.h6 Rc1 10.Rh2+ Rc2 11.Rh1 Rc1 Draw agreed.

b) 6.Kf4

This move is stronger, although even then the position is drawn.

D. 1.3

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6…Ka3

Not  6...Kb3 7.Kg3!+-.

7.Kg5

Or 7.Kg3 Rb8 8.h6 Rb1 9.Rd8 a1Q 10.Ra8+ Kb4 11.Rxa1 Rxa1=.

7...Rb8 8.Ra1 Rb5+ 9.Kh4 Rb1 10.Rxa2+ Kxa2 11.g5 Kb3 12.h6

12.g6 Rg1=.

12...Rh1+ 13.Kg4 Kc4 14.Kf5 Kd5 15.Kg6 Ke6 16.Kh7 Kf5 17.g6 Kg5= (Kopayev).

Back to D. 1.2

B) 5...Ka3 6.h6 Rb8 7.Ra1

7.h7 Rh8=.

7...Rb1 8.Rxa2+ Kxa2 9.g5 Rh1 10.Kf4 Kb3 11.Kf5 Kc4 12.Kg6 Kd5 13.Kh7 Ke6 14.g6 Rg1= (Kopayev).

Back to D. 1.2

C) 5...Rf6? 6.Ke4 Rh6 7.Kf5 Kb3 8.Ra1 Kb2 9.Rxa2+ Kxa2 10.Kg5 Ra6 11.h6+-.

Back to D. 1.1

2) 2.g4 a4 3.Rh7 a3 4.Ra7 Kb3 5.h5 a2 6.h6 Rf1 7.g5 Rh1 8.Ra6

a) 8…Rh3+ 9.Kf2 Rh4 10.g6 Rxh6 11.g7 Rxa6 12.g8Q+=.

b) 8...Rh4 9.g6 Rh3+!

Not 9...Rxh6? 10.g7 Rxa6 11.g8Q++-.

10.Kd2

10.Kf4 Rxh6 11.g7 Rxa6 12.g8Q+=.

10...Rh2+ 11.Kd3 Rh3+ =.

Or 11...Rxh6 12.g7 Rh3+!=.

Back to D. 1

II. 1.g4

This is the most direct way to win.

1…Kb4

D. 1.4

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1) 2.Rf5 Ra8

2...Rh8 3.h5 a4 4.Rf6 a3 5.Ra6 Kb3 6.h6 Rg8 7.Kf3 Rf8+ 8.Ke4 Re8+ 9.Kf5 Rf8+ 10.Kg6 Rg8+ 11.Kh5+-.

3.g5 a4 4.g6 a3 5.h5 Re8+ 6.Kd3 a2 7.Rf1 Rd8+ 8.Ke4 Re8+ 9.Kd4 Rd8+ 10.Ke5 Re8+ 11.Kd6 Re2 12.g7 Rd2+ 13.Ke5 Re2+ 14.Kd4

But not 14.Kf6? Rf2+!=.

14…Rd2+ 15.Ke3 Rg2 16.h6 Rg3+ 17.Kf4 Rg2 18.Ra1 Ka3 19.h7+-.

2) 2.g5 a4 3.g6 a3 4.Rg5 a2 5.Rg1 Rh8 6.Kf3 Rh6 7.g7 Rf6+ 8.Ke4 Re6+ 9.Kd5 Rg6 10.Rxg6 a1Q 11.g8Q+-.

Back to D. 1

III. 1.Rh7

White activates his rook in order to transfer it behind the Black pawn or to the first rank.

D. 1.5

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1) 1...Kb5 2.h5 Ra8 3.Rc7 a4 4.Rc1 a3 5.Kf3 a2 6.Ra1 Kc4 7.h6 Kd5 8.Kg4! Ke6 9.h7! Rh8 10.Rxa2 Rxh7 11.Ra6+! Ke5 12.Kg5 Rg7+ 13.Rg6+-

2) 1...Kb4 2.Rb7+ Kc4 3.Ra7 Kb5

3...Kb4 4.h5 Rh8 5.g4 a4 6.Kf3 a3 7.Kf4 Kb3 8.Kg5 Rg8+ 9.Kh4+-

4.h5 Kb6 5.Rd7 a4 6.Rd1 Kb5 7.g4 Kb4

7...Rg8 8.Kf3 a3 9.Kf4 Rf8+ 10.Kg5 Rg8+ 11.Kh4+-.

8.g5+-

3) 1...Re8+ 2.Kf3 Rf8+ 3.Kg4 Rg8+ 4.Kh3 Kb5 5.h5 Ra8

5...a4 6.Ra7 +-. 

6.Rc7 a4 7.Rc1 a3 8.Kh4 a2 9.Ra1 Kc5 10.h6 Kd5 11.Kg5

Not 11.g4? Ke6 12.Kg5 Kf7=.

11...Ke6 12.h7! Rh8 13.Kg6+-.

To be continued

  

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