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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited (Read 15707 times)
Poghosyan
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #15 - 04/08/13 at 14:08:12
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Panchenko – Antic.pgn
  

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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #14 - 04/08/13 at 14:07:40
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #13 - 04/08/13 at 14:06:53
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Back to D. 1.-17

2) 5...Re2?! 

This waiting move was played in Carls-Matisons (1928)

6.Rc4 Ra2 7.Rc7 Kf8

7...Ra6+ transposes into the game Nikolic-Ftacnik, D. 1-11- after 6.Rc4 Ra8 7.Rc7 Ra6+. 

8.Rc8+ Kg7 9.f6+ Kh7 10.e6! 1–0

V. 3…Rb5

Moving the rook to the fifth rank does not meet the threat 4.f6+. In the game Sitanggang-Mirumian (1996) the rook was already on a5 and Black played 3…Ra5-b5. Black had nothing better. 3…Kf8 would have lost to 4.f6 Ke8 5.Rb4 Ra8 (5...Ra1 6.Rb8+ Kd7 7.Rf8 Re1+ 8.Kd4 Rd1+ 9.Kc3 Rc1+ 10.Kd2+-) 6.Kf5 Kf8 7.g5+-. 

D. 1.-18

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4.Rd8?! 

4.f6+ Kh7 5.Rd7 Kg6 6.Rd8+- is quicker.  

4...Rb4+ 5.Kd5 Rb5+ 6.Kd6?!

6.Kd4 Rb4+ 7.Kc5 Rxg4 8.f6+ Kh7 9.e6+-. 

6...Rb6+ 7.Ke7?!

7.Kc7 Ra6 8.f6+ Kh7 9.Rf8 Ra7+ 10.Kd8 h5 11.gxh5 Kh6 12.Rxf7 Rxf7 13.Ke8+-. 

7...Rb7+ 8.Rd7 Rb8 9.Ra7?!

9.f6+ Kg6 10.Rd8! Rb7+ 11.Kd6 Rb6+ 12.Kc5 Ra6 13.Rg8+ Kh7 14.Rg7+ Kh8 15.Rxf7+-. 

9...Rc8

D. 1.-19

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10.e6?!

This is premature. After forcing the Black king to the back rank White has a much easier win: 10.Kd6 Kg8 11.e6 fxe6 12.fxe6 Rb8 13.Ke5+-. 

10...fxe6 11.fxe6 Rb8 

See the thread “Levenfish/Smyslov n. 190 unsound”, D. 6 (upcoming).  

VI. 3…Ra1-a8 (3…Rb8)

Black defends the back rank. This position with rook on a8 occurred in the game Tishin-S. Kasparov 2001 (rev. col.). 

D. 1.-20

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3.Rd7

3.Rc4 Kg8 4.f6 Kh7 5.Kf5! (5.Rc7? Kg6!=) 5...Ra1 6.Rc8 Rf1+ 7.Ke4 Re1+ 8.Kd5 Rd1+ 9.Kc6 Ra1 10.Rf8 Ra7 11.Kd5 Rd7+ 12.Ke4+-.  

3...Ra4+ 4.Kf3

4.Kd5 Kf8 5.f6 Ke8 6.Rb7 Ra8 7.Rb1 Kf8 8.Ke4 Kg8 9.Kf5 Ra2 10.Rb8+ Kh7 11.Rf8+-.  

4...Ra3+ 5.Kf4 Ra4+ 6.Kg3 Kf8

6...Kg8 7.Rd8+ Kh7 8.f6 Re4 9.Re8 Re1 10.Kf3 Rf1+ 11.Ke2 Rf4 12.Ke3 Rf1 (12...Rxg4 13.e6+-) 13.Rf8+-. 

7.f6 Ke8 8.Re7+ Kf8 9.Rb7 Ke8 10.Rb8+ Kd7 11.Rf8 Ke6 12.Re8+ Kd5 13.e6 1-0.

VI. 3…Rb7

D. 1.-21

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3…Rb7 is a weak move since it allows 4.f6+. After 4…Kh7 50.Rd8 White wins easily as shown above, D. 1.-2. 

In the game Panchenko – Antic (1997) White played 4.Kf4 and only after 4…Ra7 continued with 5.f6+. After 
5…Kg6 6.Rd8! Ra4+ 7.Kg3 Re4 8.Rg8+ Kh7 9.Rg7+ Kh8 10.Rxf7 h5 11.g5 Black resigned. 

In Wohl - Hernandez (2011) White played 5.Rd8 which is also winning. 5…Ra4+ 6.Kg3 (or 6.Kf3 Ra1 7.Rd7 Kg8 8.f6+-) 6...Ra3+ 7.Kh4 Ra1 (7...Re3 8.f6+ Kh7 9.Re8+-) 8.f6+ Kh7 9.Rf8 Ra7 10.Re8 Ra6 11.Rf8 Ra7 12.Kg3 Rb7 13.Kf4 Rc7 14.Kf5 Ra7 15.Re8 Ra5 16.Rf8 Ra7 17.Rxf7+ Rxf7 18.e6 Ra7 19.e7 Ra5+ 20.Ke6 Ra6+ 21.Kf7 Ra7 22.Kf8 Ra6 23.f7 1–0. 
In Novichkov-Roiz 2009 (rev. col.) Black played 6…Re4. After 7.Re8 Re1 8.Kf2 Re4 9.Kf3 Re1 10.Kf4 Rf1+ 11.Ke4 Novichkov resigned.
  

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ErictheRed
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #12 - 03/21/13 at 18:40:37
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Thank you for the excellent analysis, Poghosyan.  If I were an IM trying to become GM, or just a more diligent student, I'd definitely work through it!  As it is I just read and enjoy, but thanks.
  
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #11 - 03/21/13 at 08:27:02
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Poghosyan
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #10 - 03/21/13 at 08:26:16
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IV. 3…Rf1

This move does not meet the threat 4.f6+, but there is one trap that White must avoid.

4.Kd5?  

This move was played in Reizniece-Daulyte 2011 (rev. col.). White could have won easily by 2.f6+ Kh7 3.Rd7 Kg6 4.Rd8 Re1+ 5.Kf4 Rf1+ 6.Kg3 Kh7 7.Rf8 Rg1+ 8.Kf2 Rxg4 9.Rxf7+ Kg8 10.e6+-. 

D. 1.-16

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4...Re1?

Black misses the only saving move - 4...h5! 5.f6+ Kg6 6.gxh5+ Kxh5 7.Rd2 Kg6! 8.Kd6 Ra1 9.Ke7 Ra7+! 10.Rd7 Ra8 or 10...Ra6=.  

5.Kd6?!

White could have won easily by 5.Ra4: 5…Rd1+ 6.Kc6 Rc1+ (6...Rd8 7.Ra7+- (7.Ra5+-) ) 7.Kd6 Rd1+ 8.Ke7 Rb1 9.f6+ Kg6 10.Ra8! Rb7+ 11.Kd6 Rb6+ 12.Kc5 Re6 13.Rg8+ Kh7 14.Rg7+ Kh8 15.Kd5+-. 
5.Kd6?! makes the win more complicated. We are familiar with this position but White to play from the game  Kuba-Naumann. The position after 5.Kd6?! occurred also in Carls-Matisons (1928) and Garcia-Amado (1970).  

D. 1.-17

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1) 5...Kf8

a) 6.f6 

The best move played in Garcia-Amado (1970)

6…Re2

6...Ke8 7.Rc4 Rd1+ 8.Kc6+- is better with transposition to D. 1.-6.  

7.Rc4 

7.Ra4 or 7.Rd1 also win. 

7...Rd2+ 8.Kc5 Rd8 

8...Rd1 9.Ra4 Rc1+ 10.Kb5 Rc8 11.Ra7 Ke8 12.Rb7 Kf8 13.Kb6 Kg8 14.Ka7 Rc5 15.Rb8+ Kh7 16.Re8 Rb5 17.Ka6 Rd5 18.Kb7 Rd1 19.Rf8 Rd7+ 20.Kc8 Ra7 21.Kd8+-. 

7.Rd4

According to MegaChessBase Black resigned here.  While the Black’s position is indeed lost it would have made  sense to continue the play since the win is not that obvious. E. g. 7...Ra8 8.Kc6 Ke8 9.Rb4 Kd8 10.Kd5 Kd7 11.Rb5 Ra1 12.Rb7+ Ke8 13.Rb8+ Kd7 14.Rf8 Rd1+ 15.Kc4 Rc1+ 16.Kd3 Ke6 17.Re8+ Kd7 18.Re7+ Kd8 19.Rxf7+- 

b) 6.e6?

This move played in Reizniece-Daulyte 2011 (rev. col.) is a fatal mistake. 
4.Ra4 Rd1+ 5.Kc5 Rc1+ 6.Kd5 Rd1+ 7.Rd4 transposes to II. 3…Kf8, Woda-Nowak, after 5.Rd4. 

6...fxe6

Black draws also by 6...Ke8, 6...Re2 or 6...Re3=.  

7.fxe6 Ke8 

Or 7...Ra1, 7...Rb1=. 

8.Ra4 Rd1+ 9.Ke5 Rf1 10.Rf4 Rg1 11.Kf6 

We reached to the position of Levenfish/Smyslov n. 190 with White to play 

11...Rg2 12.Re4 Rg1 13.Ra4 =. See the thread “Levenfish/Smyslov n. 190 unsound”, D. 3. 
  

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Poghosyan
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #9 - 03/19/13 at 22:09:38
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Back to D. 1.-10

B) 4...Ra1

B1) 5.Kd6?! 

D. 1.-15

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This move is recommended by Ftacnik, Emms and Nunn. White heads his king to e7 but, as we have already seen in D. 1.-14, this a wrong plan. After  5…Ra6+ (the best practical chance)  the White king has to retreat to e4.  Black can transpose also with 5…Kf8 to  D. 1.-4. 

Every other move loses quickly. 

5…Ra7 6.Rc4 Ra6+ 7. Rc6 Ra4

7… Ra8 60.Rc7 transposes to the game Nikolic-Ftacnik (1997) (D. 1.-11 after 7.Rc7). 

8.Rc7 Rd4+ 9.Ke7 Re4 10.e6 fxe6 11.f6+ Kg6 12.f7+- (Jirovsky-Berzinsh 1994 (rev. col.)). 

B2) 5. Rb4

This move secures a quick win. 57.Rc4 also wins but is inferior to 5.Rb4 because after 5…Rd1+ 6.Kc6 Kf8 White does not have a check on the eight rank. After 7.f6 Ke8 8.Kc6 the game transposes to D. 1.-6.

5...Ra5+

5…Rd1+ 6.Kc6 Rc1+ (6...f6 7.e6 Kf8 8.Rb7 Ke8 9.Rf7 Rc1+ 10.Kd5 Rd1+ 11.Ke4 Re1+ 12.Kf3 Rf1+ 13.Kg2 Rf4 14.Kg3 or 14.Rxf6+-) 7.Kd6 Ra1 (7...Rd1+ 8.Ke7 Ra1 9.Rb7 Ra8 transposes to the main line after 10…Ra8) 8.Rb7 Ra6 with transposition to the main line after 9…Ra6+. 

6.Ke4 Ra8 7.Rb7 Ra4+ 8.Kd5 Ra5+ 9.Kd6 Ra6+ 10.Ke7 Ra8 11.Rd7 Rb8 Transposition to the game Sitanggang-Mirumian (D. 1.-18 after 8…Rb8). 

Back to D. 1.-10

C) 4...Re2 5.Kd6 Re1 6.Ra4 

In Kuba-Naumann 2003 (rev. col.) White played 6.e6? which throws away the win. After 6...Kf6 (or 6...Kf8=, but not 6...fxe6? 7.fxe6 Kf6 8.Rf4+ Kg5 9.Rf5+ Kxg4 10.Re5 Rd1+ 11.Rd5 Ra1 12.e7 Ra8 13.Ke6 h5 14.Rd4+ Kg5 15.Rd8 Ra6+ 16.Kd5 Ra5+ 17.Kc4 Ra4+ 18.Kb3 Re4 19.e8Q Rxe8 20.Rxe8 h4 21.Kc3+-) 7.Kd7 Ra1 8.Rd6 Ra7+ 9.Kc6 fxe6 10.Rxe6+ Kg7 11.Rg6+ Kh7 the position is drawn although eventually Black lost. 

6…Rd1+ 7.Ke7 Rb1 8.f6+ Kg6 9.Ra8 Rb7+ 10.Kd6 Rb6+ 11.Kc5 Re6 12.Rg8+ Kh7 13.Rg7+ Kh8 14.Kd5 Ra6 15.Rxf7+-
  
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micawber
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #8 - 02/09/13 at 16:24:51
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Now everything is clear!
I especially like Poghosyans variation nr.2,
where this whole complex endgame is reduced 
to a basic endgame of R+f6-pawn vs R 
where black is lost because his king is on the wrong side of the pawn
  
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #7 - 02/09/13 at 12:25:16
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Thank you once again Micawber! 
I thought that the final position of my line is an easy win and did not go further. But your idea to activate the king and try to defend without 2 pawns should be taken seriously into account. The win is indeed not that obvious but the position is still winning! 

After 12.Kf4  Ra4+ 13.Kg5 Re4 White should play 14.Kh4! 

Now Black has 2 main alternatives  (14...Rxe5 15.Rxe5+ Kxe5 16.g5 is lost) – 1) 14…Rf4 and 2) 14...Re1.  
 
1) 14…Rf4 15.Rh7 Rf1 16.Kg5 Re1 17.Kh6 Rxe5 18.g5 Re1 19.g6 Kxf6 20.Rxf7+ Ke6 21.Kh7+-. 
2) 14...Re1 15.Rf5 Re2 16.Rf1 Rh2+ 17.Kg5 Re2 18.Kh6 Rg2 19.g5 Rh2+ 20.Kg7 Rg2 21.Kf8 Rxg5 22.Ra1 Rxe5 23.Ra6+ Kd7 24.Kxf7+-. 

12.Kg3?! (instead of 12.Kf4) seems to be waste of time because after 12…Ra3+ 13.Kh4?! Ra8 White has to backtrack by 14.Kg3 Ra3+ 15.Kf4. 

I considered also the move 8...Rb4 (instead of 8…Ra2) with the idea to keep the king cut off on forth rank but here too White is winning. 
  
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #6 - 02/09/13 at 08:25:58
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Thx Poghosyan,
But this raises another question

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Is the final position of your variation.
But this raised another question..
Is it too late for black to activate his king:

(9.Rh1)
9....   Kd7!?
10.Rxh6,Ke6
11.Rh5,    
           (11.Rh7,Ra5)
11......,Ra5

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And this seems a position that is not easy to win for white
despite his two pawn advantage:
12.Kf4,Ra4+ 13.Kg5,Re4
or
12.Kg3!?, Ra3+ (12...Rxe5?? would lead to a lost pawn endgame after 13.Rxe5,Kxe5 14.g5 but 12...Ra8 or 12...Ra1 are possible)
13.Kh4,Ra5  (or 13...Ra8 )
And again the win is not that obvious,
because it seems that white can not entangle his pieces without losing the important e-pawn.
(but perhaps it is still there?)
  
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #5 - 02/09/13 at 07:33:14
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Thanks Micawber!

The line you suggest has already been analysed in the attached pgn-file “Duras-Capablanca 6.f6.pgn” – see the line 8...Ra1 (instead of 8...Rg1) after 14…Rd1+. 

You are right that after 1…Rd1+ 2.Ke2 Rd4 3.Rb8+ Kd7 4.Rb7+ (or 4.Kf3 Ra4 5.Rb7+) 4…Ke8 5.Re7+ Kf8 6.Kf3 Ra4 White king is cut off on the lower half of the board, but this fact does not improve the position of Black. The position of the White king on f3 has also its own advantages –the g4-pawn is protected and the king can head to the h6-pawn. After 7.Rd7 Black has 2 alternatives. 
If after 7.Rd7 the Black king goes to e8 – 7…Ke8, then White simply transfers his rook to the h-file - 7.Rd7 Ke8 8.Rd1 Ra2 (8...Ra3+ 9.Ke4 Ra4+ 10.Kf5+-) 9.Rh1. 
If Black plays 7…Ra8 (instead of 7…Ke8) then White plays 8.Kg3 heading to h6. White can win also by 8.g5. 
It is essential for White to play 7.Rd7 and not 7.Rb7 or 7.Rc7 because White has to prevent the advance of Black king via d7 to e6. 
  

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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #4 - 02/08/13 at 07:09:48
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Thx Poghesyan for another fine piece of analysis with beautifull variations. 
I have a simple question that you will no doubt have no diffculty to answer, but will take me probably some time.
The following positions occurs after the move 16.Kd3 below diagram D.1.-7 (with the minor difference that the rook is on a5) The actual position also pops up below D.1-6 in a sideline and then the rook is on b5.
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Here Black plays ...Kd8 in both lines. This seem to allow white to gain an essential tempo to get his rook on the 7th rank and more important to drive the black king to f8.

But why cant black play 1....Rd1+?
The idea is 
2. Ke2,Rd4 (2.Kc2,Re1 3.Kd2,Re4)
3. Rb8+,Kd7
4. Kf3, Ra4
5. Rb7+, Ke8
(5...Ke6? 6.Re7+,Kd5 7.e6 +-)
6. Re7+, Kf8

And white has a less favourable version of your main line,
since his king is cut off on the lower half of the board.
  
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #3 - 02/04/13 at 12:15:47
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The analysis of the lines 3…Rg1 and 3…Kf8 shows that Black’s attempt to activate his king via Kg7-f8-e7 can be effectively met by f5-f6. This possibility is also available in the lines which are analysed below (if Black tries to defend with Kf8).  

III. 3…Re1+ 

This move only improves the White king’s position.  

4.Kd5 

D. 1.-10

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Again 4…Kf8 offers the most pertinent defence. After 5.f6 Ke8 6.Kd6 Ra1 7.Rc4 the game transposes to the D. 1.-5 after 6…Ke8 7.Rc4. 

A) 4...Rf1  

This move was played in the game Nikolic-Ftacnik (1997). 4…Ra1 (B.) is not better. Just waiting on e-file also does not help - 4…Re2 (C.). 

After 4...Rf1 the position would be drawn if Black were to play (see the line IV. 3…Rf1 after 4.Kd5?).  

5.Kd6 Ra1 

57...Kf8 offers the most stubborn defence but as we already know White wins by 58.f6. 58...Ke8 59.Rd5 Kd8 60.Kc6+ Ke8 61.Ra5 Rc1+ 62.Kd5 Rd1+ 63.Ke4 Re1+ 64.Kd3 transposes to the main line of D. 1.-7 after 16.Kd3.  

D. 1.-11

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a) 6.Rc4 

The best move. The rook provides shelter from sideways checks and threatens to transfer to the seventh rank. 

6…Ra8

6...Rd1+ 59.Ke7 Rd5 60.e6 (Ftacnik) loses immediately. 
58...Ra6+ 59.Rc6 Ra8 60.Rc7 or 6...Ra5 7.Rc7 Ra6+ 8.Ke7 transpose into the game after 8. Ke7. 

7.Rc7 Ra6+

7...Kf8 would put up the most resistance. 8.Kd7 Kg7 (8…Ra5 9.Rc8+ Kg7 10.f6+ Kh7 11.e6 +-Ftacnik) 61.Ke7 Rb8 62.Ra7 Rc8 transposes to the game Sitanggang-Mirumian 1996 (see line V.3…Ra5, D. 1.-19) . 

8.Ke7 Ra4

8...Rb6 fails to 9.e6. 

9.e6 fxe6 

9...f6 10.Kd8+ Kg8 11.e7 (Ftacnik). 

10.f6+ Kg6 11.f7 Rf4 12.f8Q Rxf8 13.Kxf8 e5 14.Rc4. Ftacnik resigned. 

b) 6.Ke7?!

D. 1.-12

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This move was played in Smeets-Wiersma (2003) and also recommended in the analysis of  Ftacnik, Emms and Nunn. It wastes time but does not throw away the win. 

b1) 6...Ra5! 

This move offers greater resistance because forces the white king to go back to e4. 6…Ra7+?! (Ftacnik, Emms and Nunn) is weaker and loses very quickly (see the line b2). 6...Re1 fails to 7.e6 Re2 8.Rd7+- (Ftacnik). 

b1.-1) 7.e6? 

This move throws away the win which was still possible with 7.Kd6! (b2). 

7…fxe6 8.fxe6

8.Kxe6 Ra6+ 9.Ke7 (9.Rd6 Rxd6+ 10.Kxd6 Kf6 11.Kd5 h5!=) 9...Ra7+ 10.Rd7 Rxd7+ 11.Kxd7 Kf6=. 

D. 1.-13

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8...Ra7+

Black can draw also by 8...Ra8 and 8...Ra6=. 

9.Rd7 Ra6? 

This move of Wiersma loses. Black could have drawn by nearly every other move on a-file. E. g.  9…Ra4 10.Ke8+ Kf6 11.e7 Ke6=. See the thread “Levenfish/Smyslov n. 190 unsound”, D. 5 after  8.Rd7 Ra8. 

10.Rd6?

10.Ke8+! Kf6 11.e7+- (Micawber). 

10...Ra7+?

White returns the compliment. Black could have drawn by 10...Ra8! preventing the move Ke8.  See the thread “Levenfish/Smyslov n. 190 unsound”, D. 5.

11.Ke8 Ra8+ 12.Rd8 Ra7 13.Rd7+ 1–0

b1.-2) 7.Kd6!

White has no other choice than to bring his king back to e4.

D. 1.-14

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7…Ra6+

Here 7…Kf8 loses quickly - 8.Rc4 Ra6 9.Rc6 Ra1 10.e6 fxe6 11.Kxe6 Re1+ 12.Kf6 Ke8 13.Re6+ 1–0 Olejarczyk – Zurkowski (2011). If 9...Ra8 then 10.Kd7 Kg7 11.Rc8  Ra7+ 12.Kc6 Ra5 13.Re8 Kh7 14.f6 Ra1 15.Rf8 Ra7 16.Kd5 Rd7+ 17.Ke4 Ra7 18.Kf5 Rd7 19.Rxf7+ Rxf7 - Wohl-Hernandez (2011) - 20.e6 Ra7 21.e7 Ra5+ 22.Ke6 Ra6+ 23.Kf7 Ra7 24.Kf8 Ra6 25.f7 1–0. 

8.Kd5!

The king must head to e4. After 60.Kc7 Ra5 White has to backtrack - 61.Kd6! Ra6+ 62.Kd5. 

8...Ra5+ 9.Ke4!+- 

In this position Black has basically the same choices as in D. 1.-2 (except, of course, 3…Rg1?, 3…Re1+ and 3…Rf1). In Sitanggang-Mirumian, van Beek-Span Black decided to keep his rook on the fifth rank (see the line 3…Ra5 (b5) . 9…Ra8 transposes to the line VI. 9…Kf8 loses to 10.f6 Ke8 11.Rb4 Ra8 (11...Ra1 12.Rb8+ Kd7 13.Rf8 Re1+ 14.Kd4 Rd1+ 15.Kc3 Rc1+ 16.Kd2+-) 12.Kf5 Kf8 13.g5+-. 

b2) 6…Ra7+? 

This move which is considered in the analysis of Ftacnik, Emms and Nunn loses very quickly. 

7.Rd7 Ra8

Ftacnik and Emms consider here 7…Ra5 which loses immediately - 8.e6 fxe6 9.f6++-. 
Nunn’s move 7…Ra8 puts up more resistance. 

8.Rb7 Rc8

This position with the White rook on a7 arose in the game Sitanggang-Mirumian (1996). 

9.Kd6+- (Nunn). 

Nunn stopped his analysis here. A possible continuation could be 61...Kg8 62.e6 fxe6 63.fxe6 Ra8 64.Ke5 Re8 65.Kf6 Rf8+ 66.Rf7 Ra8 67.Rg7+ Kh8 68.e7 Ra6+ 69.Kf7 Ra7 70.Rg6 Kh7 71.Re6++-.

As in D. 1.-19, 61.e6?! instead of 9.Kd6 would be premature but it is also winning – 61… fxe6 62.Kxe6+ Kg8 63.Rd7 Rc6+ 64.Rd6 Rc8 65.f6 Ra8 66.Rd4 Ra6+ 67.Kf5 Kf7 68.Rd7+ Ke8 69.Rd5 Kf7 70.g5 hxg5 71.Rd7+ Ke8 72.Rb7 Kf8 73.Kg6 Re6 74.Rb8+ Re8 75.Rxe8+ Kxe8 76.Kg7+-.
  
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #2 - 01/19/13 at 08:59:18
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Back to D. 1-4

2) 6.e6?

2a) 6...Ra6+?

This final mistake seals Black's fate. Kopayev proved very convincingly that Black could have drawn by 6...Re1! (2b). 

7.Ke5 fxe6 8.f6!

8.fxe6? Ra1= (Kopayev).  

8...Kg8 9.Rd6 Ra1

9...Ra4 10.Kxe6 Re4+ 11.Kf5 Ra4 12.g5 Ra5+ 13.Ke6 hxg5 14.Rd8+ Kh7 15.f7+- (Kopayev).
9...Rxd6 10.Kxd6 Kf7 11.Ke5 Kf8 12.Kxe6 Ke8 13.f7+ Kf8 14.Kf6 h5 15.g5+- (Kopayev).   

10.Kxe6 Re1+ 11.Kf5 Rg1 12.Rd8+ Kf7 13.Rd7+ Kf8 14.Rh7 

14.g5 Rxg5+ (14...hxg5 15.Kg6) 15.Ke6+- (Kopayev). 

14...Kg8 15.Rxh6 Rg2 16.g5 Rg1 17.Kg6. Duras resigned.    

2b) 6…Re1!

D. 1.-9

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After 6…Re1 White is deprived of the opportunity to play f6. After exchange of f-pawns we get the pawn structure e6, g4 versus h6 which is dealt with in the thread “Levenfish/Smyslov n. 190 unsound”. I give here the lines analysed by Kopayev in 1956. For the details see the thread “Levenfish/Smyslov n. 190 unsound”. 

a) 7.Rd2 Re3 8.Rh2 fxe6 9.fxe6 Rd3+ 10.Ke5 Re3+ 11.Kf5 Rf3+ 12.Kg6 

12.Ke4 Rf6 13.Kd5 Ke7=.   

12...Rf4 13.Rh4 

13.Rg2 Re4 14.Kf5 Re1 15.Rh2 Rf1+ 16.Kg6 Rf4 

13...h5 14.Kxh5 Re4 15.Kg6 Rxe6+ 16.Kh7 Re7+ 17.Kh8 Rg7=.

b) 7.Ra4 fxe6 8.fxe6 Rd1+ 9.Ke5 Ke7 10.Ra7+ Ke8 11.Kf6 Rf1+ 12.Kg6 Rg1 13.Ra4 Rh1=.

c) 7.Kd7 Re2 8.Rd6 Re4! 9.exf7 Kxf7 10.Rg6 Rf4 11.Kd6 h5 12.Ke5 Rxg4=.

II. 3…Kf8

1) 3.f6 Ke8+-.  

We have transposed to D. 1.-5, the line 2.Rb4, after 17.Rd4.  

2) 3.Rc4

This move was played in Woda - Nowak 1986 (rev. col.).

3...Re1+ 4.Kd5 Rd1+ 5.Rd4 Ra1 

White could have won here with the familiar way - 6.f6 (or 6.Kd6 Ke8 7.f6) 6…Ke8 7.Kc6 Ra6+ 8.Kc7 Ra7+ 9.Kb6 Ra110.Rc4 Rb1+ 11.Kc6 Rg1 10.Kc7 with transposition to D. 1.-6 after 8...Rg1 9.Kc7.  
 
In the game Nowak played 6.e6? which throws away the win. After 6...Ke7 7.f6+ Kxf6! 8.Rf4+ Ke7 9.Rxf7+ Ke8 10.Ke5 Re1+ 11.Kf5 Rf1+ 12.Kg6 Rg1 13.Rf4 the position is drawn (see the thread “Levenfish/Smyslov n. 140 unsound”, the line 5.Rh7? after 9.Rf4).  

  
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Re: Duras-Capablanca (1913) revisited
Reply #1 - 01/09/13 at 18:17:27
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Duras-Capablanca 6.f6.pgn
  

Duras-Capablanca_6_f6.pgn ( 4 KB | Downloads )
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