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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov (Read 25278 times)
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #36 - 05/15/18 at 22:26:26
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New game from Poland (Gbyl-Plichta) is importand for one of the critical lines:




Can black get enought compensation after white take on f4 and plays Na4?
  

kid.pgn (Attachment deleted | 36 Downloads )
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rossia
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #35 - 09/20/14 at 18:31:14
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Who read review in Yearbook 112 by Flear? What does he say?
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #34 - 09/17/14 at 13:02:06
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najdorfslayer wrote on 09/16/14 at 19:40:08:
What does this book recommend against the Saemisch?

Cheers
NS


Against the Saemisch with 6.Be3 he recommends 6…c5.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #33 - 09/16/14 at 19:40:08
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What does this book recommend against the Saemisch?

Cheers
NS
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #32 - 06/05/14 at 20:37:48
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Scarblac wrote on 06/05/14 at 07:56:40:
Watson's 1.d4 book uses 5.h3, he only discusses 6.h3, is that really always exactly the same?

It isn't (occasionally White chooses a setup with Bd3 and Nge2) but I wouldn't let that keep you up at night: Boykov's approach with ...Na6 is also valid against 5.h3.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #31 - 06/05/14 at 15:25:01
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From what little I've seen, it looks like a good book, though he seems to go deep instead of broad, i.e. he overlooks some interesting White alternative ideas to the "main lines" that deserve attention.  Most books do, though.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #30 - 06/05/14 at 07:56:40
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I received the book yesterday, I'm a ~2000 player who wants to start playing the KID.

I'm very happy with what's in the book. He gives plenty of theory for me, I like his choice of lines, and the explanations are helpful and to the point. I think the memory markers and exercises are going to be very valuable but haven't really worked with the book yet. His comments are inspiring, e.g. after black plays ...Nh5-f4 and white can play g2-g3, my first thought would be that the knight would have to retreat, but he says things like "KID players never retreat!" and then shows convincing tactics that allow the knight to stay there. Great for a player like me trying to switch to an opening.

What I miss are side variations and early move orders, his chapters basically begin at move 7 or so and the moves before aren't discussed. Watson's 1.d4 book uses 5.h3, he only discusses 6.h3, is that really always exactly the same? Burgess has 6.a4 as line against the KID, it isn't mentioned (mentioning Burgess is a unfair, he doesn't play c4 so that's no KID). No lines with e3. His lines against the fianchetto start at move 7 or so, surely there is *some* subtle difference between 3.g3 and moving it later?

Now this is an opening I don't know well yet and move orders are probably less critical in it than in openings where the forces make contact immediately, but I still think the book is a bit incomplete without an "Odds and Ends" chapter and a little bit of discussion of move 3-6 alternatives.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #29 - 05/26/14 at 15:26:27
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Okay, but with 9...Nbd7 Black is leaving the Kavalek, and it could be mentioned that 10. Be3 ed 11. Nxd4 Nb6 and 10. Re1 ed 11. Nxd4 Ne5 12. Bf1 Re8 13. Be3 c5 (as in the two main games) are known ways of playing -- they can be found e.g. in Janjgava from 2003 and ECO from 1997 (as leading to += or "with compensation").
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #28 - 05/26/14 at 14:00:52
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I have posted a detailed review of this excellent book at my blog that might answer readers' questions:
http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/04/review-of-dejan-bojkovs-modernized.htm...

Bojkov's approach to the Kavalek System is rather unusual but looks playable and definitely cuts down on the theory.  What's more, this approach is very consistent with the ideas in the rest of the repertoire, which is likely his main motive in choosing it.  In his approach, you generally play ...e5 and ...exd4 -- and then, if possible, try to get in ...d5 as well.  If White prevents the d5 break, then you go for dynamic play.  It seems to work.

I have also posted a detailed bibliography on the Kavalek which is worth comparing:
http://kenilworthian.blogspot.com/2014/04/the-kavalek-system-vs-kings-indian.htm...

I think I prefer the main theoretical lines here, but quite a bit of theory has definitely accumulated over the years.  So Bojkov's idea is worth knowing.

Ludde wrote on 05/22/14 at 10:54:23:
kylemeister wrote on 05/21/14 at 19:20:06:
So does the stuff on 6...c6 against the Fianchetto involve playing like this: 7...Qa5 8. e4 e5 9. h3 Nbd7?  That is of course (by transposition) an old main line of the Classical Fianchetto which seems to me to be rather popular these days.

Yes, that's the line. Why he avoids 6..Nbd7 7.0-0 e5 8.e4 c6 9.h3 Qa5 is not completely clear to me, but he might want to avoid certain white deviations. I have only compared his lines to what Golubev gave in his old (excellent) book, and he has taken both that and recent developments into account. I think his recommendations against the fianchetto are quite interesting, but haven't digged deeper into it.
regarding the move-ordering with 6.h3 Na6 7.g3 I remeber a game by L'Ami which went something like 7..c5 8.Bg2 (of course 8.d5 is possible, but isn't h3 a little premature then..as is perhaps Na6...) 8..cxd4 9.Nxd4 Bd7 with the idea to hit c4 and h3 with Qc8 in case of castles. In the game white had some trouble castling if i recall correctly.
Of course Bojkov should have brought up this transposition anyway.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #27 - 05/22/14 at 10:54:23
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kylemeister wrote on 05/21/14 at 19:20:06:
So does the stuff on 6...c6 against the Fianchetto involve playing like this: 7...Qa5 8. e4 e5 9. h3 Nbd7?  That is of course (by transposition) an old main line of the Classical Fianchetto which seems to me to be rather popular these days.

Yes, that's the line. Why he avoids 6..Nbd7 7.0-0 e5 8.e4 c6 9.h3 Qa5 is not completely clear to me, but he might want to avoid certain white deviations. I have only compared his lines to what Golubev gave in his old (excellent) book, and he has taken both that and recent developments into account. I think his recommendations against the fianchetto are quite interesting, but haven't digged deeper into it.
regarding the move-ordering with 6.h3 Na6 7.g3 I remeber a game by L'Ami which went something like 7..c5 8.Bg2 (of course 8.d5 is possible, but isn't h3 a little premature then..as is perhaps Na6...) 8..cxd4 9.Nxd4 Bd7 with the idea to hit c4 and h3 with Qc8 in case of castles. In the game white had some trouble castling if i recall correctly.
Of course Bojkov should have brought up this transposition anyway.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #26 - 05/21/14 at 23:26:09
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Quote:
Thanks; I was curious as to whether he would go with that or maybe 11...Ne5.  After 11...Nh5 (a "book" pawn sac since something like 1990, incidentally) 12. Bxd6 Qf6, Panczyk and Ilczuk thought 13. Nb3 (instead of 13. Nc2 as played by Premnath) to be "!".


He gives 13...Nf4! (Which is also how 13.Nc2 is answered) and then covers 14.c5;14.Re1;14.Rb1 and 14.Bxf4.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #25 - 05/21/14 at 22:22:33
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Glenn Snow wrote on 05/21/14 at 21:59:18:
He gives the game Premnath -  Kokarev, Mumbai Mayor's Cup 2010 for 11.Bf4 Nh5! with fairly detailed notes.


Thanks; I was curious as to whether he would go with that or maybe 11...Ne5.  After 11...Nh5 (a "book" pawn sac since something like 1990, incidentally) 12. Bxd6 Qf6, Panczyk and Ilczuk thought 13. Nb3 (instead of 13. Nc2 as played by Premnath) to be "!".
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #24 - 05/21/14 at 21:59:18
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kylemeister wrote on 05/19/14 at 17:50:10:
One might wonder if Bojkov appears to dispute the traditional "+= with best play" view of that way of playing against the Classical.  For example, Panczyk & Ilczuk in their book of about five years ago thought White could achieve that by means of 11. Bf4 (instead of 11. Be3 as played by Kramnik).


He gives the game Premnath -  Kokarev, Mumbai Mayor's Cup 2010 for 11.Bf4 Nh5! with fairly detailed notes.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #23 - 05/21/14 at 19:20:06
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So does the stuff on 6...c6 against the Fianchetto involve playing like this: 7...Qa5 8. e4 e5 9. h3 Nbd7?  That is of course (by transposition) an old main line of the Classical Fianchetto which seems to me to be rather popular these days.
  
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Re: Modernized: The King's Indian Defence by Bojkov
Reply #22 - 05/21/14 at 18:28:36
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I got the book yesterday. Some words about my first impressions.

Pluses:

1. The enthusiasm of the author shines through the whole book.
    This makes me want to dig deeper into the material.

2. Coverage of the Classical with 7...exd4 is refreshing. With the
    open center and piece play this feels more like an Open Game.
    Indeed I remember dabbling with this line in the 1990s after
    reading about it in Tony Kostenīs book about the Philidor-
    Defence (!) via the move order 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 exd4
    4 Nxd4 g6 5 c4 Bg7 6 Nc3 Nf6 6 Be2 0-0 7 0-0 Re8 8 f3 c6.

3. Also I like the coverage of 6...c6 against the Fianchetto since it
    looks like a relatively low theory weapon for Black.

Minuses:

1. I donīt like the layout. Itīs not very user friendly if you give the
    main line in bold and then also start the variations with a move
    in bold. Using a structure with a), b), c) etc. is much better to
    follow. If you really want to use a format with complete games
    then if my memory serves me right Andrew Greetīs "Beating
    unusual Chess Defences: 1 e4" is a good example how to
    structure it well. Personally I strongly prefer a tree format.

2. Donīt recommend lines where a forced draw cannot be avoided
    unless you have an alternative ready! This is an issue in the
    chapter about the Four-Pawns-Attack where after 1 d4 Nf6
    2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 e4 d6 5 f4 0-0 6 Nf3 e5!? is recommended.
    Thatīs generally an interesting choice but has the flaw that
    Black canīt avoid the repetition after 7 dxe5 dxe5 8 Nxe5
    Qxd1+ 9 Kxd1 Na6 10 Be2 Rd8+ 11 Kc2 Nc5 12 Bf3 Nfxe4 13
    Nxe4 Bf5 14 Re1 Bxe5 15 fxe5 Rd4 16 Kc3 Rd3+ 17 Kc2 Rd4. If
    you are playing for a win with Black you have to look elsewhere
    which means studying 6...c5!

3. Make sure your reader canīt be move ordered in a line you
    suggest. As mentioned above against the Fianchetto 6...c6 is
    recommended. Now in the Chapter about the Makogonov Bojkov
    misses the possibility 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5.
    Nf3 O-O 6. h3 Na6 7. g3!? which has already been pointed out
    by Vigorito in his "Attacking Chess: The KID" books. White
    playing Nf3 and h3 in the Fianchetto is quite normal while ...Na6
    for Black isnīt. And he canīt transpose back to the recommen-
    dation against the Fianchetto with 7...c6 since there Black
    usually continues with ...e5 and ...Nbd7. Also some advice what
    to do if White delays d2-d4 would be valueable here.

4. Perhaps a Chapter about „Odds and Ends“ should have been
    added since some lines are missing. 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7
    4 e4 d6 5 Nge2 is only mentioned as a transpositional tool in the
    Samisch and 5 Bd3, 4 Nf3 0-0 5 Bg5 and some other minor lines
    donīt seem to be covered.

I hope the above doesnīt sound too nitpicking and despite my criticism I have a positive feeling about the book and give it a provisional rating of 3,5 g7-bishops out of five Wink
  
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