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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Dreev: Cozio Defence (Read 12526 times)
PANFR
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #10 - 02/12/15 at 14:16:41
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To me, it seems that the mainline after 4.Nc3 is just suspect. I was able to innovate in a recent correspondence game (16.0-0-0!), and I won quite easily, although I have to admit Black's endgame play was quite poor, almost engine-like.
But 4.Nc3 d6!? is sound, and not easy to crack.

  
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Fllg
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #9 - 07/23/14 at 17:36:06
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Thank you for mentioning 9.Bd2. First impression is indeed quite favourable for White.

From reading the chapter about 4.c3 d5 Iīm not sure why you think Dreev doesnīt trust this line but again he ignores Sokolovīs findings  in "The Ruy Lopez Revisited".

Certainly there is a lot to explore here in various lines but this makes the Cozio an interesting subject of study.
  
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #8 - 07/23/14 at 01:42:06
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Fllg wrote on 07/08/14 at 21:16:58:
Dreevīs latest effort makes a very good impression on me. While looking like a small book the author manages to cover 2-3 playable possibilities in all major tries White has for trying to get an advantage (4 Nc3, 4 c3 and 4 0-0 g6 5 c3).

Unfortunately the book has no bibliography and so itīs unclear if the author has used the earlier texts by Sokolov ("The Ruy Lopez revisited") and Kosten (one chapter in "Dangerous Weapons: The Ruy Lopez"). Since I have found some game references in Dreevīs book for which I was unable to find the complete scores in Megabase my impression is that the author has mainly relied on his own notes.

Ever since I have read John Emmsī excellent "Easy Guide to the Ruy Lopez" I was under the impression that 4 Nc3 is a critical test of the Cozio and I used it successfully in the one game where I had to face this line with White. Sokolov too considers it as the "most unpleasant move for Black". One of his lines continues 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 Nge7 4 Nc3 (! Sokolov) g6 5 d4 exd4 6 Nd5 Bg7 7 Bg5 h6 8 Bf6 Bxf6 9 Nxf6+ Kf8 10 0-0. Here Dreev gives 10...a6! as the only good move but after the continuation 11 Bc4 Kg7 ignores 12 Qd2! as given by Sokolov who evaluates the position after 10 0-0 as "simply better for White". This may or may not be true but if Dreev had used Sokolovīs book he could have adressed this.

Another small issue is the bad editing of the book. More than once the author seems to have confused "Black" with "White" and "later" with "now". The latter may have to do with the translation but a good editor would easily have spotted this.

Itīs true that Dreev doesnīt really use the "Quick Repertoire" as usually intended. But this doesnīt bother me since following the bold moves in the "Step by Step" chapters fulfills the same aim. Also the book contains 28 annotated "Complete Games" which is very useful to get a feel for the opening.

Still, the book offers a wealth of interesting suggestions and is also useful for those having the earlier works on the Cozio. The last chapter covers the indifferently named "Modern Variation" (I prefer "Aronian Variation" as introduced by Tony Kosten) and while it looks less thorough than Kostenīs work Dreev identifies the critical lines well and has some useful additions to offer.

So the book is highly recommended to anyone interested in a line against the Ruy which requires relatively little theoretical knowledge.


This does not seem dangerous to me, what happens after 12.Qd2 (!) if Black simply takes the Knight on f6 with 12...Kxf6. Yes White wins back his piece with 13.Qf4+, but I don't see an advantage for him.

Dreev's book is interesting, but I have unearthed critical analytical flaws in it as well, for instance, he tries a clever move-order to avoid a Dangerous Exchange Sac that White has in the main line of the so called Modern Cozio:

The Line runs 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nge7 4.0-0 g6 5.c3 a6 6.Ba4 Bg7 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 0-0!? 9.d5 Na5! [Instead of the more commonly played 9...b5?! is Dreev's preferred choice. Dreev is trying to avoid the line that runs 10.Bc2 Na5 11.Bd2! a powerful exchange sac that has put this line under a cloud] 10.Bd2 is now less effective due to 10...Na4 11.Bc3 Nxb2 12.Qc2 Nxa4 and Black is clearly fine, in the other line the light squared Bishop is on c2 immune from exchange and White has more than enough comp for his pawn.

So far so good, but here comes the wrinkle, White too can be clever with his move order as follows:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nge7 4.c3! a6 (4...d5 is another option, but Dreev does not seem to fully trust it) 5.Ba4 g6 6.d4 exd4 7.cxd4 Bg7 8.d5 Na5!? Dreev's Finesse, now he analyses 9.0-0, 9.Nc3 9.Nbd2 and concludes that Black is fine in each case, however, 9.Bd2! just as in the line with 4.0-0 is a powerful exchange sac, and I think that Black now has an unpleasant position whatever he does.

Despite the above discovery, I think the book is quite good overall with lots of new material to chew on. Hopefully the line I highlighted for Black can be repaired, as I tend to have a soft spot for the Cozio.

Regards,

Topster Smiley

  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #7 - 07/08/14 at 21:16:58
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Dreevīs latest effort makes a very good impression on me. While looking like a small book the author manages to cover 2-3 playable possibilities in all major tries White has for trying to get an advantage (4 Nc3, 4 c3 and 4 0-0 g6 5 c3).

Unfortunately the book has no bibliography and so itīs unclear if the author has used the earlier texts by Sokolov ("The Ruy Lopez revisited") and Kosten (one chapter in "Dangerous Weapons: The Ruy Lopez"). Since I have found some game references in Dreevīs book for which I was unable to find the complete scores in Megabase my impression is that the author has mainly relied on his own notes.

Ever since I have read John Emmsī excellent "Easy Guide to the Ruy Lopez" I was under the impression that 4 Nc3 is a critical test of the Cozio and I used it successfully in the one game where I had to face this line with White. Sokolov too considers it as the "most unpleasant move for Black". One of his lines continues 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 Nge7 4 Nc3 (! Sokolov) g6 5 d4 exd4 6 Nd5 Bg7 7 Bg5 h6 8 Bf6 Bxf6 9 Nxf6+ Kf8 10 0-0. Here Dreev gives 10...a6! as the only good move but after the continuation 11 Bc4 Kg7 ignores 12 Qd2! as given by Sokolov who evaluates the position after 10 0-0 as "simply better for White". This may or may not be true but if Dreev had used Sokolovīs book he could have adressed this.

Another small issue is the bad editing of the book. More than once the author seems to have confused "Black" with "White" and "later" with "now". The latter may have to do with the translation but a good editor would easily have spotted this.

Itīs true that Dreev doesnīt really use the "Quick Repertoire" as usually intended. But this doesnīt bother me since following the bold moves in the "Step by Step" chapters fulfills the same aim. Also the book contains 28 annotated "Complete Games" which is very useful to get a feel for the opening.

Still, the book offers a wealth of interesting suggestions and is also useful for those having the earlier works on the Cozio. The last chapter covers the indifferently named "Modern Variation" (I prefer "Aronian Variation" as introduced by Tony Kosten) and while it looks less thorough than Kostenīs work Dreev identifies the critical lines well and has some useful additions to offer.

So the book is highly recommended to anyone interested in a line against the Ruy which requires relatively little theoretical knowledge.
  
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #6 - 07/08/14 at 12:58:58
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Actually I'm not knowledgeable at all on this line Smiley I was just curious and bought the ebook and compared to what Kosten gave in the DW book. And yes I suffer from buyer's remorse too a bit but I find it subsides after a few days. :p
  
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #5 - 07/08/14 at 12:26:49
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Thanks for that link, gwnn, and for your other helpful observations: you're clearly very knowledgeable about this line. In spite of my determination not to buy any more chess books until I've finished with the ones I've already got, my appetite has been whetted and I've gone ahead and ordered this. I'm already feeling the first stirrings of buyer's remorse ...
  
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #4 - 07/08/14 at 08:37:27
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Dreev cuts off his analysis after
5. Bb3! h6 6. d4 exd4 7. Nxd4+/= saying that h6 is not a useful move for black in a Scotch game (he adds that neither is Ng6, the other alternative). There is also a little analysis on 5. .. d5, not mentioned by Kosten, and it is also deemed to be better for White. Kosten seems to think that 4. Nc3 is the best argument against Nge7 directly, Dreev gives three different moves against it: g6, Ng6, and d6, apparently preferring the last one. Note that in the main line 4. 0-0 g6 5. c3 he offers both Bg7 and a6, probably recommending a6, transposing back to Aronian. You can see the full contents here:

http://chess-stars.com/resources/contents_Cozio.pdf
  
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #3 - 07/07/14 at 23:58:20
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That's interesting. There's a chapter by Tony Kosten in Dangerous Weapons: Ruy Lopez on the 3...a6, 4...Nge7 line, and he mentions 5.Bb3 there. Tony's conclusion seems to be that Black is fine as long as he is careful, so Dreev presumably has seen something he doesn't like for Black. I suppose the theory of these early ...Nge7 lines is still relatively undeveloped, so evaluations can shift much more quickly and radically than in better established variations. My curiosity to see what Dreev has to say about these lines is such that I might be not be able to resist the temptation to buy this book!
  
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #2 - 07/07/14 at 23:26:22
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Actually Dreev specifically addresses 3 .. a6 and then 4 .. Nge7 saying that 5 Bb3 is a sort of positional refutation of it. I will get back to you a bit later... He prepares 2-3 different replies for Black to most of White's main options.
  
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Re: Dreev: Cozio Defence
Reply #1 - 07/07/14 at 22:52:37
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I'd be interested in hearing your overall view on the book once you've had a chance to look at it, gwnn. 3...Nge7 is an attractive option for those of us who'd prefer to avoid having to face the Exchange Variation, but my understanding was that it's not supposed to be very good without ...a6 thrown in first. Certainly Sokolov, in The Ruy Lopez Revisited, is not very impressed by it: he thinks White can get a small but lasting edge and reckons that Black is doomed to passive defence by and large. Presumably Dreev tries to overturn this verdict: is he successful, would you say?
  
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Dreev: Cozio Defence
07/07/14 at 22:11:59
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I got this ebook from Chess-Stars. It looks pretty nice! Unfortunately Dreev seems to misunderstand the concept of "Quick repertoire" - it never goes beyond move 5 or 6... I was hoping to have something simple and fun if I feel like 2 Nc6 but all the variations are in the "step by step" section.
  
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