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Seeley
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Re: Schliemann DVD by Sam Collins
Reply #3 - 05/17/15 at 21:39:18
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Thanks very much for your helpful replies, Jon and Fllg, I appreciate your having taken the time and trouble to give me your thoughts.
Jonathan Tait wrote on 05/16/15 at 06:14:33:
I wouldn't be particularly worried about defending that endgame, and I can't imagine any of my (much lower level than Carlsen or Topalov) opponents taking this on as a winning attempt for White either.

But anyway, you don't have to play the 6...Bc5 line. Either 6...d6 or 4...Nf6!? is rather more fun, even if the latter is certainly inferior.

I didn't explain myself as clearly as I should have done, but what particularly bothers me about the ending under discussion is being steered into it by lower rated players as a risk-free drawing attempt rather than by stronger players as a winning attempt, but I take your point, it shouldn't be too difficult to defend. Thanks for the suggestions of alternative ways of playing the 4.d3 line. I was aware of 6...d6 and felt that locking the dark-square bishop in like that wasn't really in the spirit of the opening - or at least not in the spirit of the way I was hoping to play it - but I'd not considered 4...Nf6 at all, and I shall certainly give that interesting suggestion a look.

Fllg wrote on 05/16/15 at 08:12:40:
the line 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.Nc3 fxe4 5.Nxe4 Nf6 6.Nxf6+ Qxf6 7.Qe2 Be7 doesn´t look like that much fun for Black either. Here he gives up a pawn for the bishop-pair but it seems to me that White is playing for two results here, too?

You're absolutely right about this, but the line with 5...d5 rather than 5...Nf6 gives plenty of scope to outplay a weaker or unprepared opponent, so I'm less concerned about 4.Nc3 than 4.d3. You're right, too, that the Schliemann seems to be a drawing weapon at higher levels, and I was a bit surprised that the repertoire offered by Collins on his DVD appears to be based on precisely these drawish lines - which is why I'd still be interested to hear opinions form anyone who has actually watched the DVD.


  
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Fllg
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Re: Schliemann DVD by Sam Collins
Reply #2 - 05/16/15 at 08:12:40
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I´m no expert on the Schlieman for either side but the line 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.Nc3 fxe4 5.Nxe4 Nf6 6.Nxf6+ Qxf6 7.Qe2 Be7 doesn´t look like that much fun for Black either. Here he gives up a pawn for the bishop-pair but it seems to me that White is playing for two results here, too?!

Seemingly on higher levels the Schliemann is used as a drawing weapon. But as Jon Tait said this may not be of much concern for us lesser mortals.
  
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Jonathan Tait
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Re: Schliemann DVD by Sam Collins
Reply #1 - 05/16/15 at 06:14:33
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Seeley wrote on 05/15/15 at 20:52:11:
I don't really fancy adding to my repertoire a defence where my opponent can steer me fairly effortlessly into an ending where all the chances are his.


I wouldn't be particularly worried about defending that endgame, and I can't imagine any of my (much lower level than Carlsen or Topalov) opponents taking this on as a winning attempt for White either.

But anyway, you don't have to play the 6...Bc5 line. Either 6...d6 or 4...Nf6!? is rather more fun, even if the latter is certainly inferior.
  

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Seeley
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Schliemann DVD by Sam Collins
05/15/15 at 20:52:11
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A new Chessbase DVD on the Schliemann has recently appeared, by Sam Collins. Has anyone watched this yet and formed a view as to its merits?

I looked into taking up the Schliemann a few years ago as an occasional counterattacking weapon against the Ruy Lopez that had the virtue of avoiding the Exchange Variation, but I was put off by the fact that White appears to have a fairly straightforward path to a small advantage in the 4.d3 line. Specifically, there seems to be no sensible way of avoiding the major-piece ending that Radjabov reached against both Topalov and Carlsen in 2008. Black managed to draw both of these, but for those of us not possessed of Radjabov's technique, it's an ending that it'd be all too easy to lose from time to time and almost impossible to win, barring a horrific blunder by White. I notice from the Contents List that the Topalov game forms the basis of one of the chapters on the DVD.

What I am interested to know is if Collins offers any improvements for Black, or any useful suggestions on how to avoid lumbering oneself as Black with this grim defensive task. If so I'll certainly buy the DVD but, if not, then I don't really fancy adding to my repertoire a defence where my opponent can steer me fairly effortlessly into an ending where all the chances are his.

Any thoughts?
  
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