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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) old indian hanham variation (Read 34063 times)
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #40 - 06/15/20 at 21:01:51
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Just today I received my copy of "Banerjee's" book in the post. After weighing all the options I ordered from the Book Depository. I was charged a 50% markup, similar to the German websites, but unlike them "free" shipping to the USA and no minimum order. They have low ratings, but I looked at the reviews and decided the negative reviewers were just too fragile. I am 100% sure Book Depository did not have it in stock, rather they ordered it and forwarded to me. I received it in 18 days total.
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #39 - 08/07/16 at 19:27:18
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Pessoa wrote on 01/11/16 at 15:52:50:
[...]
1) Who is the author (MCB)?

An interesting question, without doubt. [...]
Hence, supposing the author of Novelties in the Old Indian Defence is Tareq Syed [...]




For those interested:

That pseudonym, Mahesh Chandra Banerjee, seems to be chosen with a quite sophisticated background indeed.

This weekend I read an article in Kaissiber 23/2006 concerning British 19th century player John Cochrane (1798 - 1878), written by the chess historian Alfred Diel.

Cochrane, a lawyer, for some years lived in Calcutta, India, where he was president of the local chess club. As a strong player, Cochrane was in need for appropriate adversaries.

Around 1850 he hired a Brahmin called Moheshunder Bannerjee by Diel (in German, I don't know of the English source) for the club - which sounds very similar to Mahesh Chandra Banerjee.

This Mr Bannerjee of Calcutta learnd his lessons obviously well and quickly. In 1852 he lost a match of 25 games with Cochrane only by +9 -13 =3.

Diel wrote that the openings, Bannerjee used, later stimulated Tartakover to christen 1.d4 Nf6 as "Indian".
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #38 - 02/13/16 at 20:11:57
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LeeRoth wrote on 02/12/16 at 23:23:56:
@motorhead -- yes, seems hard for Black to equalize in this Be3 line.  I also find the early d5 lines hard to meet.  For me, the Old Indian is for blitz only, don't think I'd play it OTB. 



Well, I'm a bit more optimistic - or maniac.
I think the OID can even serve as OTB or even corr. opening.
But the clear cut queenside plan of White's beginning with 8.Be3 demands some non typical new approach - that I haven't found yet ...
May be Tay's suggestions are right, but somehow my gut feeling says that they may be short winded...

I once came to the OID via the KID. As a not so theoretical alternative.

And the simple difference in pawn structure all too often strikes me.
In the OID one saves a tempo for not playing g7-g6 - and exactly that saved tempo is then missing in the sense of pawn structure chess: No plans with f7-f5... And f5 is a soft spot...

gut gambit opened an new thread on what one can call the Hanham KID
http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/chess/YaBB.pl?num=1455295432

I too once and again circel arround that idea (not gut gambits exact idea but the idea playing a not so forced variation as the Mar-del-Plata is)
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #37 - 02/12/16 at 23:23:56
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@motorhead -- yes, seems hard for Black to equalize in this Be3 line.  I also find the early d5 lines hard to meet.  For me, the Old Indian is for blitz only, don't think I'd play it OTB.
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #36 - 02/11/16 at 23:26:06
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LeeRoth wrote on 02/11/16 at 02:19:27:
Here are some thoughts on the Be3 line. 

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 Nbd7 4. e4 e5 5. Nf3 Be7 6. Be2 c6 7. O-O O-O 8. Be3.

I.  Black most often plays 8..a6 9.d5 cxd5 10. cxd5 b5 (if 10... Ng4 11. Bd2 b5 12. Ne1 Ngf6 13. Nc2 Nc5) Now a key line runs: 11. Nd2 Nb6 12. a4 bxa4 13. Nxa4 Nxa4 14. Rxa4 Bd7 15. Ra3! +/= since the White b-pawn is safer than the Black a-pawn.

II.  In this line, if Black closes the center instead: 8..a6 9.d5 c5 then I think theory favors White.  E.g., 10. Rb1 Ne8 (10... g6 11. Bh6 Re8 12. Ne1 Kh8 13. Qd2 Rb8 14. Nd3 b5 15. cxb5 axb5 16. b4 c4 17. Nb2 Nb6 18. Be3 Bd7 19. f4 +/=) 11. b4 b6 12. bxc5 bxc5 13. Rb3 g6 14. Bh6 Ng7 15. Qc1 Kh8 16. Na4 +/=   

III.  In Move-by-Move, Junior Tay prefers 8... Re8 9. d5  (White also has 9. Qc2, waiting for Black to play 9.. Qc7 and then 10. d5 +/=  rather than Tay's 10.h3.) 9... Nf8 (Another line is 9... c5 closing the center and after 10. Ne1, then 10... Nf8 but 11. Nd3 Ng6 12. a3 Bd7 13. b4 b6 14. Rb1 is still +/=) 10. Ne1 Ng6 11. Nd3 h6! According to Tay, this idea of GM Demchenko is the key move.  Black wants to be able to play ..Bg5.  From here: 

12. b4 Bd7 13. Rc1 cxd5 14. cxd5 b5 with an  "interesting struggle" according to Tay.  I would still rather be White, although his edge is probably rather small.

12. f3 Bd7 13. b4 cxd5 14. cxd5 b5 15. a4 a6 16.  Qd2 Qc7 17. Ra3 Qb7 18. Rfa1 +/- Khairullin-Demchenko, Moscow 2012.  Tay suggests that Black could have improved with 14... Nh5 15.g3 Bg5.    

Obviously, this whole line needs further analysis.


On I.
I once played a pre computer era Correspodence game as White
motörhead - ann.
Private corr. Match at the beginning of the 1990s
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 e5 4.Nf3 Nbd7 5.e4 Be7 6.Be2 0–0 7.0–0 c6 8.Be3 a6 9.d5 cxd5 10.cxd5 b5 11.Nd2 Ne8 12.f3
Khalifman gives  12.b4! Lg5 13.Lxg5 Dxg5 14.a4 bxa4 15.Sc4! Stohl - Jones, Moscow 1994, as main line.
12...Bg5 13.Bf2 Nb6 14.a4 b4 15.a5 Bxd2 16.Bxb6 Qg5 17.Nb1 Bf4 18.Qe1 Bh3
18...Qh6!
19.Qf2 Bd7 20.g3 Qg6 21.Kh1 Bh6 22.Qe1 f5?! 23.Qxb4 fxe4 24.fxe4 Nf6 25.Qxd6 Qxe4+ 26.Bf3 Qd3 27.Nc3 Bh3 28.Rf2 Rae8 and now 29.Be2 would have been best (I played 29.Db4 and won later)

I found/find it easier to play the white pieces...

On II.
9.d5 c5 is given by Banerjee who now cites 10.Ne1 Ne8 11.Qd2 Nc7!? Farago - Appel, Bundesliga 2014
but as you give it, I overall doubt black's prospects in this delayed Czech Benoni.
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #35 - 02/11/16 at 02:19:27
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Here are some thoughts on the Be3 line. 

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 Nbd7 4. e4 e5 5. Nf3 Be7 6. Be2 c6 7. O-O O-O 8. Be3.

I.  Black most often plays 8..a6 9.d5 cxd5 10. cxd5 b5 (if 10... Ng4 11. Bd2 b5 12. Ne1 Ngf6 13. Nc2 Nc5) Now a key line runs: 11. Nd2 Nb6 12. a4 bxa4 13. Nxa4 Nxa4 14. Rxa4 Bd7 15. Ra3! +/= since the White b-pawn is safer than the Black a-pawn.

II.  In this line, if Black closes the center instead: 8..a6 9.d5 c5 then I think theory favors White.  E.g., 10. Rb1 Ne8 (10... g6 11. Bh6 Re8 12. Ne1 Kh8 13. Qd2 Rb8 14. Nd3 b5 15. cxb5 axb5 16. b4 c4 17. Nb2 Nb6 18. Be3 Bd7 19. f4 +/=) 11. b4 b6 12. bxc5 bxc5 13. Rb3 g6 14. Bh6 Ng7 15. Qc1 Kh8 16. Na4 +/=   

III.  In Move-by-Move, Junior Tay prefers 8... Re8 9. d5  (White also has 9. Qc2, waiting for Black to play 9.. Qc7 and then 10. d5 +/=  rather than Tay's 10.h3.) 9... Nf8 (Another line is 9... c5 closing the center and after 10. Ne1, then 10... Nf8 but 11. Nd3 Ng6 12. a3 Bd7 13. b4 b6 14. Rb1 is still +/=) 10. Ne1 Ng6 11. Nd3 h6! According to Tay, this idea of GM Demchenko is the key move.  Black wants to be able to play ..Bg5.  From here: 

12. b4 Bd7 13. Rc1 cxd5 14. cxd5 b5 with an  "interesting struggle" according to Tay.  I would still rather be White, although his edge is probably rather small.

12. f3 Bd7 13. b4 cxd5 14. cxd5 b5 15. a4 a6 16.  Qd2 Qc7 17. Ra3 Qb7 18. Rfa1 +/- Khairullin-Demchenko, Moscow 2012.  Tay suggests that Black could have improved with 14... Nh5 15.g3 Bg5.    

Obviously, this whole line needs further analysis.







  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #34 - 02/10/16 at 21:18:23
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motörhead wrote on 01/12/16 at 22:42:04:
Michael Ayton wrote on 01/11/16 at 17:15:02:
Very useful, Pessoa -- thank you! Maybe in time we'll move on to discussing (here or in another thread) some critical lines and how 'MCB' and Junior Tay compare in treating them ...



I am in a positive sense astonished to find chess players interested in the Old Indian...

I think the first focus should be on this natural 8.Be3 variation in the classical. It seems to be the most challenging, at least the most topical way to play for white.

Sources are "opening for white acc to Kramnik 1a" by Khalifman, "the Old Indian move by move" by Tay and "Novelties in the Old Indian Defence" by Banerjee.

Tendency is +/= in a passive setting (from black's view) as the white pieces can be arranged very effectively to forward queen's side play (esp Nf3-e1-c2).

In total I'm not fully convinced by either of the sources. The white's side book (Khalifman) is the one with the most material (but the oldest), the black's side books (Tay, Banerjee) are a bit, say, muddied water. Both books are inclined to black's flag. But in the very 8.Be3-variation they are a bit, no, quite unclear.

So taking statistics as the basis, 8.Be3 acctually is the acid test... 


Me be, this post, dealing with some theoretical questions, was buried a bit under the two following.

So I repeat it with a little hope for one or two answers...
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #33 - 01/12/16 at 23:12:08
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Pessoa wrote on 01/11/16 at 16:57:27:
(Continued from Reply #26)

2) Is the chess any good?

I think this book is a good, clear and thoughtful introduction to the Old Indian Defence. Yet it exclusively deals with variations where White erects the classical pawn centre c4/d4/e4. The Black repertoire put forward to confront this involves an early …c6. [...]


I fully agree as given before. I do not wonder that there are flaws in this book. I have quite a fews opening books at hand. And not many reach the depth and structure Mr "Banerjee's" work has.

I was especially surprised to see him quote L.M. Pickett's old "The Old Indian renewed" which is an interesting source from pre-computer time - but faulty or at least overly optimistic here and there. If I remember it right I could detect a clear fault in the analysis concerning the 4-pawn-variation. I haven't rechecked it but I was surprised to find Banerjee quoting Pickett on this variation...
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #32 - 01/12/16 at 23:01:46
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Pessoa wrote on 01/11/16 at 15:52:50:
[...]
1) Who is the author (MCB)?

An interesting question, without doubt. [...]
Hence, supposing the author of Novelties in the Old Indian Defence is Tareq Syed [...]


A very deep analysis indeed. Especially that "proof" with the game Dominik Klaus – Tareq Syed. A lawyer could be proud of that.
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #31 - 01/12/16 at 22:42:04
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Michael Ayton wrote on 01/11/16 at 17:15:02:
Very useful, Pessoa -- thank you! Maybe in time we'll move on to discussing (here or in another thread) some critical lines and how 'MCB' and Junior Tay compare in treating them ...



I am in a positive sense astonished to find chess players interested in the Old Indian...

I think the first focus should be on this natural 8.Be3 variation in the classical. It seems to be the most challenging, at least the most topical way to play for white.

Sources are "opening for white acc to Kramnik 1a" by Khalifman, "the Old Indian move by move" by Tay and "Novelties in the Old Indian Defence" by Banerjee.

Tendency is +/= in a passive setting (from black's view) as the white pieces can be arranged very effectively to forward queen's side play (esp Nf3-e1-c2).

In total I'm not fully convinced by either of the sources. The white's side book (Khalifman) is the one with the most material (but the oldest), the black's side books (Tay, Banerjee) are a bit, say, muddied water. Both books are inclined to black's flag. But in the very 8.Be3-variation they are a bit, no, quite unclear.

So taking statistics as the basis, 8.Be3 acctually is the acid test... 
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #30 - 01/12/16 at 11:08:32
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Michael Ayton wrote on 01/11/16 at 17:15:02:
Very useful, Pessoa -- thank you! Maybe in time we'll move on to discussing (here or in another thread) some critical lines and how 'MCB' and Junior Tay compare in treating them ...

You're welcome  Smiley

As for Junior Tay's book, I don't have it. Browsing through MCB's book, I found the following references to analysis by Tay: 

Rodshtein – Andreikin 2009 (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1561522). MCB mentions Tay's suggestion of sacrificing a pawn with 15…Ng3:!? 16.fg3: g4!, and that Tay thinks that after 15…Nf4, White could have tried 16.Bf4: ef4: 17.e5! de5: 18.d6 Bd6: 19.Nd5, with compensation.

Karpov – Christiansen 1993 (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1069077). MCB mentions Tay's recommendation of 13…a5! (instead of 13…Qb8, as played in the game).

Zhu Chen – Dumitrache 1998 (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1631094). MCB quotes a few of Tay's notes to this game. But MCB's main point here is that he suggests Black play 8…cd5: 9.cd5: Nh5! (instead of 8…a5, as played in the game), because he reckons Black should avoid the g2-g4 clamp in this kind of position.

This list may be incomplete, however.
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #29 - 01/11/16 at 17:15:02
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Very useful, Pessoa -- thank you! Maybe in time we'll move on to discussing (here or in another thread) some critical lines and how 'MCB' and Junior Tay compare in treating them ...
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #28 - 01/11/16 at 17:09:49
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Quote:
Michael Ayton, did you receive Novelties in the Old Indian yet?


@dmp4373:

Please accept my apologies for massive delay in replying! I've been 'out of it', originally with work then latterly with a bad bug ...

I never received the book! A while after your post, I contacted epubli, and they simply said it must have got lost in transit and that they would refund my payment (which they promptly did). I tried to say 'Hang on -- keep the payment and resend the book', but they said the refund had already been made and that I should reorder the book to obtain it. Christmas then intervened and I never got round to it ...

@ Pessoa:

I await your Part 2 eagerly! I originally ordered the book 'cos as kylemeister said it looked pretty good. As of now, I shall await your verdict! If the author is Syed, I wonder if he is friendly with any of the German GMs who specialise in the OI, and if so whether there's any indirect input there. Also, while it's appreciable that an untitled player might want to publish under a pseudonym, I can't help wondering what the reason(s) for his publishing the book might be. Maybe just sheer enthusiasm?

  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #27 - 01/11/16 at 16:57:27
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(Continued from Reply #26)

2) Is the chess any good?

I think this book is a good, clear and thoughtful introduction to the Old Indian Defence. Yet it exclusively deals with variations where White erects the classical pawn centre c4/d4/e4. The Black repertoire put forward to confront this involves an early …c6.

The book begins with an introduction, followed by 10 illustrative games. Then, starting from the basic position reached after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 e5, the bulk of the material is divided into seven main chapters:

5.Nf3 Nbd7 6.Be2                 343  pages
5.Nf3 Nbd2 6.g3                     51  pp.
5.g3 Be7 6.Bg2 0-0 7.Nge2     22  pp.
5.Nge2 Be7                              7  pp.
5.f3                                       29  pp.
5.d5                                      25  pp.
5.f4 / 5.Be2 /5.de5:                11  pp.

The author does a good job explaining the subtleties of the different move orders and the essential plans Black has at his disposal. He also painstakingly keeps track of the many possibilities for transpositions between the different (sub)variations. This is a must, as White can vary the order in which he plays his first moves in a large number of ways. 

Practically every subvariation in the main chapters is examined with the help of a 'main game' played with this subvariation. While these 'main games' occasionally are given in full, most of them are only followed to a certain point at which MCB proposes an improvement on the original play. (The 'Avrukh approach' to writing an opening book, so to speak.) Some variations are further illustrated by additional games, always given in full, but mostly without annotations.

The quality of the annotations varies quite a bit. In the introduction we find: "The author did not use the latest computer programs to recheck every line. Instead, when mentioning 'the engines' this refers to results of analyses with different programs having been done over the last ten or fifteen years."   

Well, this is something that's beyond me. But OK, so we have to do the rechecking ourselves. It then transpires quickly that the 'improvements' found by MCB cannot always be relied on. For example:

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 e5 5.g3 Be7 6.Bg2 Nbd7 7.Nge2 0-0 8.0-0 Qa5. Here the author states: "If, fore [sic] example 9.h3?! […], then it turns out that the pawn on c4 is already lost after 9…ed4:! 10.Nd4: (or Qd4: Ne5! threatening c6-c5 followed by Nc4:, and 11.b3? loses to the 11…Bh3:! tactic) 10…Ne5! 11.Qe2 Qb4! and black [sic] has everything he hopes for in the 8…Qa5-line."

While this may seem convincing at first, Komodo 9 disagrees with the author's evaluation (as does Houdini 1.5, by the way). In reply to "11…Qb4!", the machine nonchalantly comes up with 2.f4! Nc4: 13.a3! Qc5 14.Rd1!, when it reckons White has a clear advantage despite being a pawn down. The threat is 15.b4; the black knight on c4 and the queen on c5 are somewhat unstable. As an aside, White does not lose after 11.b3? Bh3:! – he only is a pawn down, which is serious enough, admittedly.

Another example:

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 e5 5.Nf3 Nbd7 6.Be2 Be7 7.d5 0-0 8.Qc2 a6 9.Rd1 Qc7 10.Nh4 g6 11.Bh6 Re8 12.Nf3 b5!? (Sokolov – Timman, blitz 1999). Now MCB gives the line "13.a3? ed4: 14.Nd4: bc4: 15.Bc4: d5! 16.ed5:? Ng4! -+", in order to illustrate the "potential disadvantages for White."

Yep; at first sight, 16…Ng4 looks like a crushing move indeed, threatening both …Nh6: and …Qh2:+. But on closer inspection, 16…Ng4?? proves to be an outright blunder, enabling White to whip up a winning attack by means of 17.d6! Bd6: (17…Qd6:? 18.Bf7:+! is even much worse) 18.Bf7:+! Kf7: (18…Kh8 19.Be8:) 19.Qb3+ Kf6 (the only move) 20.Ncb5! (a killing shot, intending Qf3+). While this accurate sequence of moves may be difficult for White to find at the board, the tactical motif d5-d6 followed by Bf7:+ could crop up in similar variations of this opening, too.   

MCB often refers to other authors who have written about the Old Indian as well; sometimes he criticizes them, offering improvements; sometimes he follows them almost blindly. Quite a few times he quotes from a somewhat older brochure by Len Pickett, The Old Indian renewed (1984). For example, after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 e5 5.d5 Be7 6.Bd3 0-0 7.Nge2, Pickett apparently gives "7…Nh5 (or 7…Ne8) 8.0-0 (8.Ng3 Nf4 =+) 8…Bg5! with a fluid game for Black". MCB approves of this; but Lars Schandorff, in his book Playing 1.d4 – The Indian Defences (2012), takes this line two moves further, laconically suggesting "9.Bc2 N  Bc1: 10.Rc1: +="; and now it's the engines which approve … (By the way, Schandorff's work is not listed in the bibliography of MCB's book.) One might add that Black does not seem better after 8.Ng3 Nf4; the machine plays 9.0-0 and evaluates the position as equal.

A far more drastic example is the line 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 e5 5.f4 Qa5. Here MCB gives 6.Qd3 as the main move (which it is), but he also quotes "Pickett's main line" 6.Qd2 g6 7.Nf3 Nbd7 8.Be2 Bg7 9.0-0 0-0 10.b3 ed4: 11.Nd4: Re8 =+. MCB does not comment on this, but in fact 10.b3? is a blunder (much better is 10.de5: de5: 11.d5=/+=). After 10.b3? ed4: 11.Nd4:, Black can play 11…Ne4:! (instead of 11…Re8?), winning the exchange and a pawn after the more or less forced sequence 12.Ne4: Qd2: 13.Bd2: Bd4:+, with a practically decisive advantage.

Having mentioned Schandorff's book, I am led to another point. In his work A Strategic Chess Opening Repertoire for White (2012), John Watson gives a small chapter on the Old Indian, too. He recommends a setup with an early d4-d5, followed by, Bd3, h3, and Nf3. But he does not cover lines with Black playing an early …c6. On the other hand, MCB's strategy against this specific white setup is based on the exchange …cd5:, which looks OK to me. So playing an early …c6 really might have something to it.

To conclude, I'd say this book is a useful introduction to the position arising after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 d6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 e5, especially for the black player. Hence you might want to get it, but you should be able to put up with an English that is sometimes sounding a bit 'too German', and you should be willing to carefully check the lines – all of them, I'm afraid …

(Should my own English sound 'too German' for your ears, dear native speakers: pardon me! But then, I am not writing a book …)
« Last Edit: 01/12/16 at 11:30:51 by Pessoa »  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #26 - 01/11/16 at 15:52:50
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motörhead wrote on 12/05/15 at 10:54:34:
MM0621 wrote on 11/05/15 at 16:28:29:
I never heard of the author. How can we find his rating?

But there are at severe indications that the author is a German: He publishes with a german based publishing house [...]. He uses a load of german books and magazines as references. And not too well known at that, e.g. the magazine Kaissiber, that you surely won't get the easy way in India. [...] And there are some translation hints on the german speaking nature of the author [...].

I think that there is some logic that the author is of second or even lesser rank regarding the rating and title. Would he be a titled player [...] he would have gone to one of the usual thematic publishing houses to offer his manuscript. [...] But, given the asumption that Bannerjee is a pseudonym, who is he? [...]

When browsing through the book I more than once came across the name Syed. [...] Searching for a chess player called Syed leads to Tarek Syed from Frankfurt [...] with an ELO of only 2056... Looking through his games shows that he is a real devotee to OI-themes with both colours.

But, okay, that is reading coffee grounds...

A few comments on the book Novelties in the Old Indian Defence by Mahesh Chandra Banerjee, 7th edition, December 2015 (http://www.epubli.de/shop/buch/45636/excerpt).

Some aspects (cover, layout, index of variations) have already been dealt with here, and I'll concentrate on two questions: 1) Who is the author?  2) Is the chess any good?

1) Who is the author (MCB)?

An interesting question, without doubt. To quote from The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (vol. 1, ch. IV): "I know there are readers in the world, as well as many other good people in it, who are no readers at all, – who find themselves ill at ease, unless they are let into the whole secret from first to last, of every thing which concerns you." – This is the author, Laurence Sterne, speaking to himself ...

Well, I think it is pretty obvious that Mahesh Chandra Banerjee (MCB) is a pseudonym. And it is also easy to establish that the author is from Germany (Austria, Switzerland, …). In any case, he must be used to communicating in German every day. This can be inferred from the following facts (already mentioned here in the forum, but I'll elaborate on them a little bit):

1. The author has published the book with a Berlin print-on-demand house; the book has an entry in the catalogue of the German National Library.

2. The author quotes from many German chess books and magazines. It seems he didn't have much trouble getting access to these sources, which should not be readily available in other parts of the world, and obviously he is also able to read them; he quotes terms such as "Hemmung", "hässlich", "abscheulich", and "Verrammelungsstrategie" explicitly in German.

3. The author's English betrays him. I'll give some examples also to be found in the excerpt available online. The following table of expressions is structured as follows:

'English' as used in the book – intended meaning in German – correct English (for what it's worth ...)

lesser precise (p. 15) – weniger präzise – less precise
tactical motive (p. 22) – taktisches Motiv – tactical motif
eventually (p. 20) – eventuell – possibly / perhaps
eventual (p. 27) – eventuell – possible
adaequate (p. 26) – adäquat – adequate
preparation of (p. 53) – Vorbereitung von – preparation for
as more as (p. 57) – umso mehr als – all the more so as
broshure (p. 68) – Broschüre – brochure
an own section (p. 76) – einen eigenen Abschnitt – a section of its own / its own section
example for (p.77) – Beispiel für – example of

Evidently, here the author has 'translated' from the German a bit too directly …

(Actually, this table could be made much, much longer, but I have included only cases that appear at least twice in the book. That said, "motive" [instead of "motif"] turns up on almost every page.)

Another hint: Also at least twice in the book one discovers "Chigorins" (p. 24), i.e., the German form of the genitive case (instead of  "Chigorin's").

Still not convinced? Well, roughly a dozen times the author accidentally uses German chess notation, e.g., "Sg3" (instead of "Ng3"; p. 47), "Lf1" (instead of "Bf1"; p. 78), and "Tb1" (instead of "Rb1"; p. 82), etc.

(However, I have no idea why he uses the word "derivation" (p. 7) [Ableitung] when he means "deviation" [Abweichung]. He does so not only once or twice, but umpteen times throughout the book.)

So the author of the book is fluent in German. But who is he? 

First of all, I think it's reasonable to assume that he is not a strong GM; otherwise he would not have published the book under a pseudonym. And it's also reasonable to assume that the author has included a few of his own games in the book. Accordingly, it has already been surmised here by motörhead that MCB could be Tareq Syed, Germany, born in 1972, current ELO 2037. He plays for his club SC Brett vorm Kopp Frankfurt (Frankfurt am Main).

Fair enough. Of the approximately 135 'main games' in the book, 3 are by Syed as Black, and at least 5 more of his games get a mention in the annotations. A remarkable number, I think, even if Syed has played the Old Indian for at least 20 years, with many of his games published in ChessBase's Mega Database 2016. As Black, only Jörg Hickl, Lutz Espig (both renowned experts on the Old Indian), and Eric Lobron are represented in the book by more than 3 'main games' each (6, 6, and 5, respectively). And they are strong GMs …

Of particular interest is a game Dominik Klaus – Tareq Syed (open tournament Oeffingen, 9th June 2014): It is quoted in the book, even though no reference to it can be found in the Mega Database 2016; online databases don't contain this game either. And as it was drawn after only 14 moves, the game probably has not appeared in print. So where did the author get its score from? – Well, perhaps he knows Syed and got the score from him. Or he was among the onlookers as the game was in progress. Or – most likely, I think – the author is Syed himself.

But then the author might also have downloaded the game. Actually, the Oeffingen chess club published a PGN-file with 64 games of the tournament in 2014, including the said encounter Klaus – Syed. (By now this file has disappeared again from the homepage of the club, but its president was kind enough to send me a copy ...) Still, who would have downloaded these games? The author of a book on the Old Indian who did not participate in that tournament himself? I doubt it. But what if the author did participate in it? Let's see. The strongest players there (ELO > 2100) were V. Shishkin (2489), G. Schnepp (2303), M. Holzhäuer (2287), H. Degenhardt (2254), A. Vaysberg (2178), and T. Heining (2117). However, none of these guys plays the Old Indian defence. But Tareq Syed does …

Now, this name does not sound genuinely German. Does Tareq Syed speak German? – Well, I am sure he does: All of his 287 games in the Mega Database 2016 were played in Germany, mostly in the Frankfurt area, over a period of almost 23 years (1992 – 2014). Furthermore, on Amazon I found a little German brochure by a certain Dr Tareq Syed (Studium Biologie: Zoologie – Ergänzungsreader Zoologisches Grundpraktikum). The author was born in 1972, and he studied at the University of Frankfurt, where he got his PhD from. Hang on! 1972? Frankfurt? It would seem that the author of this brochure is none other than Tareq Syed, the chess player.

Hence, supposing the author of Novelties in the Old Indian Defence is Tareq Syed, one should not be surprised at his English sounding a bit 'German' here and there.

Another detail perhaps worth mentioning: I got my copy not directly from epubli, but (via Amazon) from Karin Afshar, who has designed the cover of the book. And she lives in Frankfurt, too …

But then, all this may be pure guesswork, meaning nothing.

(To be continued ...)
« Last Edit: 01/11/16 at 17:39:02 by Pessoa »  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #25 - 12/10/15 at 07:28:00
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Michael Ayton, did you receive Novelties in the Old Indian yet?
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #24 - 12/05/15 at 11:17:39
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The last post for now...

Old Indians suddenly have two new sources at hand.

The other book is "The Old Indian Move by Move" by Junior Tay published by everyman.
That too is hafty package of some 500 pages. And it got good reviews and a thread here too
http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/chess/YaBB.pl?num=1446556224
but not a frequently visitid one...
It would be a task to compare the booth books... One should tackle the task variation by variation which is not so easy as Move by Move-book do not pronounce the 2.1.2.3.1-style that ist used by Bannerjee...

In the Classical with 8.b4!? (or ?!) Bannerjee gives 8...d5! as his main line quoting Martin -Morrison, 1990, and giving 8...exd4 (Uhlmann - Espig, 1995) as a sideline.
Tay makes it the other way round...
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #23 - 12/05/15 at 10:54:34
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MM0621 wrote on 11/05/15 at 16:28:29:
I never heard of the author. How can we find his rating?



That's what wonders me too. And it provokes me to some thoughts.
There are two obvious indications that the author is an Indian: the mere sound of his name and the fact, that he dedicates the book to the Indian GM Mir Sultan Khan.
But there are at severe indications that the author is a German: He publishes with a german based publishing house (and a totally unknown newbie in the business at that). Her uses a load of german books and magazines as references. And not too well known at that, e.g. the magazine Kaissiber, that you surely won't get the easy way in India. He even has a dutch language source, De leeuw, het zwarte wappen (van Reekom/Jansen), in his references , which may be easy to get in Germany but surely difficult in India.
And there are some translation hints on the german speaking nature of the author (e.g. unexplanably he uses the very unusal word "figure" for "piece" [as it is used in all normal english chess books], deriving from the german word "Figur", I think.)

I think that there is some logic that the author ist of second or even lesser rank regarding the rating and title. Would he be a titled player it would be normal that he would have gone to one of the usual thematic publishing houses to offer his manuscript. As there should be interest in the topic Old Indian Defence as there are or better were no special books at all about this defence. The more: The interest is for sure, as publisher everyman has shown with its recently published Old Indian Move by Move (so now OI fans - do those exist?! - now at once have two new books on the OI).

Only an unknown player with no credit to his name would have choosen the way to this unknown publishing house (where in fact he self is responsible for the content as epublishi surely has no lector or editor dedicated to chess).   

And he did a good job as my first impression signals - look for the sample to judge yourself.)

But, given the asumption that Bannerjee is a pseudonym, who is he? This will be the search for the needle in the hay.

When browsing through the book I more the once came across the name Syed. I have no actual data base but only the internet as a source. Searching for a chess player called Syed leads to Tarek Syed from Frankfurt (and now perhaps Karlsruhe) with an ELO of only 2056...
Looking through his games shows that he is a real devotee to OI-themes with both colours. An with white he plays the half open games in the big clamp style given by van Reekom/Jansen in De Witte Leeuw...

But, okay, that is reading coffee grounds...

Could a 2056-player explain the depth of a complex opening like the OI? ...

I have no clue but my gut feeling yells out at least that Bannerjee is a pseudonym. Simply because you need experience to explain the subtlties of the OI. So you need someone who theorized and practized on it. And in our time that would leave traces in the internet. And and there are no traces to a Mr. Bannerjee...
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #22 - 12/05/15 at 09:18:32
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Gut Gambit wrote on 11/22/15 at 00:35:06:
Here is a little taster from the book. 

[Event "Bundesliga"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2014.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Farago"]
[Black "Appel"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A55"]
[PlyCount "94"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 c6 4. e4 e5 5. Nf3 Nbd7 6. Be2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Be3
a6 9. d5 c5  [...]

I picked this sample ( 8.Be3) because of the Khalifman repertoaire mentioned in another thread. The author ( whoever he is!) gives three solutions; 8...a6., 8...Ng4 followed by 9...Qe8 as mentioned by Kylemeister, and also 8...Qc7.

I think an ordinary club player ( also master class) would really benefit from studying this book.

If its really kind of special its too early to say.. But I`ll be back...
GG


I browsed through the book the last days. And it is really extraordernarilly thoughtful - even if you compare it to better products of reknowned publishers.
Okay, the layout is, well, improvable.
And the cover... I wondered how such a rubbish could get through. Every dilletantic photograph of a board with a normal OI-position in action would have served better. But that's matter of taste and it is a proof for the saying "don't judge a book by its cover."...

Back to the content: The book has great depth regarding the main lines (classical with 8.Re1, 8.Qc2, 8.Rb1 etc.; white fianchetto variations; white Sämisch style; misc.).
The explanations a very, very thoughtful and clear. And the author gives a great deal of attention to move orders and explains aspects of them. That is great in so far as one as an OI-player is to high degree inclined to some sort of auto pilot play just throwing out the pattern moves like a7-a6 and b7-b5 if one has no clear grip to the exact position on the board. But to my experience exactly this leads all to often to cramped positions without prospects.

Critical point: The variation 8.Be3 in the classical is dealt with on quite a few pages - but nevertheless a bit superficial. I'm not totally convinced with it. Excatly this chapter misses the clear structure the other chapters own e.g. the author after 8...a6 9.d5 doesn't touch on 9...cxd5 entirely (which, because it is the mainline of normal theory, would be interesting even if he comes to the conclusion that this approach isn't usefull for black). But he gives new insights nevertheless.
And as an OI devotee one has to admit that the 8.Be3 approach  is surprisingly difficult to deal with...
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #21 - 12/05/15 at 08:36:45
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Michael Ayton wrote on 12/03/15 at 19:33:45:
A dark warning (hope it's no more than that) from NE England! On the strength of the online sample, I ordered this book from epubli, via Amazon. I ordered on 9 November; I was given a delivery time of 16-26 November and payment was deducted on 11 November. And you've guessed it -- so far, no book. I wrote to Amazon today to enquire -- no reply yet, but I'll post again as soon as I get one ...



I ordered it too for the same reason. I am from Germany and the delivery took quite some time (nearly 20 days). So as you are from Northern England it may last even longer. It is Christmas time an your parcel is one in a few million a day.

So I hope you will get it soon.
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #20 - 12/03/15 at 19:33:45
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A dark warning (hope it's no more than that) from NE England! On the strength of the online sample, I ordered this book from epubli, via Amazon. I ordered on 9 November; I was given a delivery time of 16-26 November and payment was deducted on 11 November. And you've guessed it -- so far, no book. I wrote to Amazon today to enquire -- no reply yet, but I'll post again as soon as I get one ...
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #19 - 11/25/15 at 17:03:47
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Incidentally the .pdf sample mentions a game with ...Qe8, Bd8 I recall from way back -- Lindsay-Fritzinger.  Black won via a sacrificial attack, but I gather it was probably unsound.
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #18 - 11/25/15 at 16:21:01
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Thanks for the explication. This ...Qe8, Bd8 try seems to be the latest attempt to breath life into the Old Indian; I seem to remember it being written up as such in NIC magazine in the SOS column.

Of course, one must remain open-minded, but the manoeuvre looks quite contrived, so I would be surprised if it has lasting value beyond the capacity to surprise.
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #17 - 11/24/15 at 18:27:44
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Here is another sample from this book. The words and variations are the authors, except of course the comment on the Gelfand-Morozevich game.

   

His third option, 8...Qc7 quickly results in an invitation of repeting moves as far as I can see ( a draw with black isnt always bad) . So probably this is the most dynamic against Khalifmans chosen variation 8.Be3 in this book.

GG 

  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #16 - 11/24/15 at 14:49:00
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Gut Gambit wrote on 11/24/15 at 10:37:03:
Yes, this is a Czech-Benoni a tempo down. But I dont think its a Czech-Main Line with the bishops on e2 and e3. As you say, black has avioded other critical responses and variations. The cost is a tempo.


It's basically a Nf3 / Be2 'Classical line' (don't know if it is thus-named, but it seems as good as any other) where White has used his extra tempo to play Be3. Not the end of the world, perhaps, but I'd definitely be interested in the alternatives instead.
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #15 - 11/24/15 at 10:37:03
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Yes, this is a Czech-Benoni a tempo down. But I dont think its a Czech-Main Line with the bishops on e2 and e3. As you say, black has avioded other critical responses and variations. The cost is a tempo.

The Czech-Benoni is supposed to be slightly cramped, but rather solid, or? Maybe not fun. And the Petrosian game given above underlines your point  Smiley  (although I think he could saved it) .

I will be back with variation B)   8.Be3-Ng4 9.Bd2-Qe8!? soon. Maybe there is more action there...

GG

  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #14 - 11/23/15 at 13:23:58
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Gut Gambit wrote on 11/22/15 at 00:35:06:
Here is a little taster from the book. 




I picked this sample ( 8.Be3) because of the Khalifman repertoaire mentioned in another thread. The author ( whoever he is!) gives three solutions; 8...a6., 8...Ng4 followed by 9...Qe8 as mentioned by Kylemeister, and also 8...Qc7.



The position after 9..c5 is just a Czech Benoni a tempo down, isn't it (the c-pawn having taken two moves to reach c5)? OK, tempi tend to get thrown around with abandon in the Czech Benoni, but at the same time, it's hard to get excited about this, no? You can argue you've avoided White's most critical tries against the Czech Benoni, but still, a Czech Benoni main line a tempo down probably won't set the pulse racing. Or is there some sublety I'm missing?
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #13 - 11/22/15 at 01:55:05
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Reminds me of this oldie:


  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #12 - 11/22/15 at 00:35:06
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Here is a little taster from the book. 




I picked this sample ( 8.Be3) because of the Khalifman repertoaire mentioned in another thread. The author ( whoever he is!) gives three solutions; 8...a6., 8...Ng4 followed by 9...Qe8 as mentioned by Kylemeister, and also 8...Qc7.

I think an ordinary club player ( also master class) would really benefit from studying this book.

If its really kind of special its too early to say.. But I`ll be back...

GG

  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #11 - 11/20/15 at 21:20:06
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I got my copy of "Novelties in the Old Indian defence" some days ago. It seems like a (very) good book in contents, but a little poor in layout, as I mentioned in the thread. Also, finding your way in this book when it comes to which variation on which pages is up to oneself to take notes and fill in.

But still.  What I have seen of it ( I only used to be a 2150) the author is very .. PROPER. Knows his stuff. Wonder who the author is, by the way.

I get the kind of Gallagher -feeling when writing about the KID. This seems like a book of love for Old Indian, and thanks MM0621 for spotting it!  Smiley

Best regards

GG
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #10 - 11/06/15 at 23:48:13
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Got that far.
But they do not deliver outside Europe. "Beware, there be monsters there..."

Dear B,

unfortunately we cannot deliver our books to Japan, so we really can't do anything for you in that case.

Best Regards,

Swantje Kasberg
epubli Team
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #9 - 11/06/15 at 19:11:10
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BTW. No wonder about the 512 pages when the layout is like that...?
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #8 - 11/06/15 at 19:05:10
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Bibs wrote on 11/05/15 at 23:52:44:
Well, my my, the excerpt is a good, thorough read. Impressed, I am. Whole book looks to be 512 pages.
But I was unable to order it. Couldn't make sense of epubli, and amazon.de does not deliver the thing outside Teuton zone. Not on amazon, or elsewhere.
Hmmm.



I managed in the end....

You must first confirm your new account by a link sendt from them to the email adress you used when you opened the account.    

Puh, but managable...
6 books available it said...  Puh again...

GG
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #7 - 11/06/15 at 16:02:27
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Dink Heckler wrote on 11/06/15 at 13:01:02:
Playing the Old Indian doesn't make you live longer; it just feels like it.  http://www.chesspub.com/yabbfiles/Templates/Forum/default/wink.gif


Grin

However the Old Indian is on my "weeding out of my repertoire" list.
  

Those who want to go by my perverse footsteps play such pawn structure with fuzzy atypical still strategic orientations

Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, stuck in the middlegame with you
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #6 - 11/06/15 at 13:01:02
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Playing the Old Indian doesn't make you live longer; it just feels like it.  Wink
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #5 - 11/06/15 at 03:07:07
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Possibly a pseudonym, yes. If it's this guy, he must have found the fountain of youth:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moheschunder_Bannerjee
  

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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #4 - 11/06/15 at 01:11:40
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As a follow-up, I wrote direct to epubli, the publisher, and left a note on the Facebook page of the book. One can but try...

Author's name? I rather wonder if that is a pseudonym....
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #3 - 11/05/15 at 23:52:44
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Well, my my, the excerpt is a good, thorough read. Impressed, I am. Whole book looks to be 512 pages.
But I was unable to order it. Couldn't make sense of epubli, and amazon.de does not deliver the thing outside Teuton zone. Not on amazon, or elsewhere.
Hmmm.
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #2 - 11/05/15 at 16:28:29
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I never heard of the author. How can we find his rating?
  
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Re: old indian hanham variation
Reply #1 - 11/05/15 at 16:13:51
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Gee, I'd say it looks quite good.
  
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Posts: 10
Joined: 11/25/14
old indian hanham variation
11/05/15 at 15:20:51
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