Latest Updates:
Page Index Toggle Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5
Topic Tools
Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Cummings Everyman English Repertoire (Read 28827 times)
tipau
Full Member
***
Offline


I Like ChessPublishing!

Posts: 167
Location: London, England
Joined: 01/25/08
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #61 - 04/15/19 at 12:03:40
Post Tools
Very useful post for me - thanks David
  

FIDE: ~2100
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMDavidCummings
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 8
Joined: 11/20/16
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #60 - 04/12/19 at 15:44:59
Post Tools
Chess-Student,

In my opinion, the lines from the book that have developed the most are the 1.c4 e5 line and the anti-QGD setup. Both have seen many top-level games played over the last 2+ years. Here is a brief list of key games I have covered in ChessPub Updates. These include earlier game references and analysis in the notes.

After 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.e3 Bb4 5.Qc2, see:
5...d6 6.Ne2 Santos Ruiz-Kevlishvili, Belgium 2019,
5...Bxc3 6.Qxc3 Caruana-Ding Liren, Batumi 2018,
5...Bxc3 6.bxc3 So-Sevian, Douglas 2018

After 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.e3, see:
4...Be7 Nepomniachtchi-Bacrot, Batumi 2018
4...a6 Mamedyarov-Georgiadis, Biel 2018
4...b6 (by transposition) Moroni-Brunello, Salerno 2018

mn,

If Black adopts a “QID” approach (4...b6), a popular setup for White is to go for a double fianchetto rather than a classical Queen’s Indian. For example Nakamura-Ganguly, Kolkata 2018, went 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.b3 b6 5.Bb2 Bb7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Nc3 Nbd7 8.Rc1 a6 9.d4 Bd6 10.g3 0–0 11.Bg2 Qe7 12.0–0 Rfe8 13.Nd2 Rad8 14.Qc2 c5 15.dxc5 bxc5 with a typical hanging pawns position. This structure is similar to that seen in Game 31 (Bosiocic-Caruana)  in Chapter 12 of my book. It is a useful setup to know if Black plays this solid system. See also the notes to Moroni-Brunello mentioned above.

David
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Chess-Student
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 3
Joined: 10/26/17
Gender: Male
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #59 - 04/06/19 at 22:45:22
Post Tools
Dear mister Cummings and fellow subscribers.

I'm a new subscriber here and I'm trying transitioning from playing g3-lines a la Marin to lines with an early d4 according to your repertoire (I have your book).

I've noticed in some threads here you've been giving tips on newer recommendations as well as referencing some games here, but it's a not so easy for a new subscriber. I was wondering if perhaps you (or others) could write a list of which updated games are important to look through, to make it easier to get started.

Many thanks!
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
mn
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 399
Location: Ottawa
Joined: 09/22/16
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #58 - 04/06/19 at 22:13:17
Post Tools
Different question - I see in his Black Repertoire series Jan Gustafsson suggested [1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 e6 3 Nf3 d5 4 e3] 4...b6!?, which as far as I can tell isn't mentioned anywhere in Cummings' text. Does White have a reasonable way of avoiding the Classical [e3] Queen's Indian?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
MW
Junior Member
**
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 71
Joined: 04/20/18
Gender: Male
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #57 - 02/14/19 at 00:10:19
Post Tools
mn wrote on 02/13/19 at 17:25:01:
Ahhhh fair enough. But after 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4 3 e3, Black would normally avoid 3...c5 4 b4, and play 3...Nc6 instead, right?


Yep, I think 3...Nc6 just gives black a very comfortable game after 4 exd4 Nxd4 5 Nxd4 Qxd4 6 Nc3 c6....so if you want to play the Reti you really need to be prepared to go down the 3 b4 line...as a Reti player I can say 3 b4 leads to interesting games.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
tipau
Full Member
***
Offline


I Like ChessPublishing!

Posts: 167
Location: London, England
Joined: 01/25/08
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #56 - 02/13/19 at 17:34:38
Post Tools
That's right. After 2.c4 d4 most players have been going 3.b4, which has built up a fair amount of theory. The alternatives (3.e3 and 3.g3) have been entirely de-fanged theoretically speaking. I don't know much about the line 2.e3 c5 3.c4 d4 4.b4, but I assume Black can make his choice between either accepting a pawn for adequate compensation or play 4...Nf6 with a decent position.
  

FIDE: ~2100
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
mn
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 399
Location: Ottawa
Joined: 09/22/16
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #55 - 02/13/19 at 17:25:01
Post Tools
Ahhhh fair enough. But after 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4 3 e3, Black would normally avoid 3...c5 4 b4, and play 3...Nc6 instead, right?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
tipau
Full Member
***
Offline


I Like ChessPublishing!

Posts: 167
Location: London, England
Joined: 01/25/08
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #54 - 02/13/19 at 17:19:06
Post Tools
Yes 3.c4 is an option too. I was (perhaps wrongly) assuming that you wanted to avoid reversed Benoni structures, due to your aversion to 2.c4 d4.
  

FIDE: ~2100
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
mn
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 399
Location: Ottawa
Joined: 09/22/16
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #53 - 02/13/19 at 16:10:18
Post Tools
What about 3 c4, intending 3...d4 4 b4 and 3...e6 4 cd5 ed5 5 d4 - ?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
tipau
Full Member
***
Offline


I Like ChessPublishing!

Posts: 167
Location: London, England
Joined: 01/25/08
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #52 - 02/13/19 at 07:05:52
Post Tools
mn wrote on 02/12/19 at 19:30:30:
Question:

So let's say I want to play something similar to Cummings' proposed repertoire, but I want to avoid both 1 c4 e5 and 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4. So I would play 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3 and 1 Nf3 Nf6 2 c4. What are the extra lines I'd need to add (particularly in 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3, which I have almost no experience with)?


The main one I think would be 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 c5. White then has couple of options:
1) 3.d4 with a probably transposition to the Panov-Botvinnik Caro-Kann after 3...cxd4 4.exd4 Nf6 5.c4. Here White would prefer to have played Nc3 than Nf3 but it's still playable.
2) 3.b3 with a Nimzo-Larsen where Black has played d5 and c5. The good news is that I believe most White 1.b3 players like to play against this line. The bad news is that you're playing a 1.b3 line and Black is fine.

Another way of looking at it is: do you want a reversed Tarrasch or Queen's Indian with an extra tempo?
  

FIDE: ~2100
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
mn
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 399
Location: Ottawa
Joined: 09/22/16
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #51 - 02/12/19 at 19:30:30
Post Tools
Question:

So let's say I want to play something similar to Cummings' proposed repertoire, but I want to avoid both 1 c4 e5 and 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4. So I would play 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3 and 1 Nf3 Nf6 2 c4. What are the extra lines I'd need to add (particularly in 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3, which I have almost no experience with)?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Krudos
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 14
Joined: 04/17/18
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #50 - 01/31/19 at 20:06:02
Post Tools
Hi David

As ever, a very helpful reply.

On my last query, it was more how to respond if Black plays g6 and Bg7 rather than Be7? So on page 109 in the bracket for move 4, Black plays Nbd7 and then fianchettoes.

Perhaps there is possible transposition to the KID , page 353 , but Black has in addition the option to play exd4 ?

Best wishes

Krudos
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
tipau
Full Member
***
Offline


I Like ChessPublishing!

Posts: 167
Location: London, England
Joined: 01/25/08
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #49 - 01/31/19 at 08:50:28
Post Tools
After a recent game I came across a transposition I don't think is covered. Hopefully I'm wrong and can be directed to the page!

I can't find mention of a Queen's Indian Defence set-up for Black. Specifically after 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e3 Nf6 4.Nf3 and now 4...b6!?. It's hard to see a good way for White to avoid a transposition to the e3 QID with a later d2-d4. For example 5.b3 Bb7 6.Bb2 Nbd7 7.d4 Bd6 8.Bd3 0-0 9.0-0 a6 (9...Re8!?) 10.Rc1 Qe7 11.Na4 dxc4 12.bxc4 Rad8!?

The lines covered are where Black puts the bishop less actively on e7.
  

FIDE: ~2100
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMDavidCummings
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 8
Joined: 11/20/16
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #48 - 01/31/19 at 00:41:45
Post Tools
Hi Krudos,

1. In the Anti Nimzo-Indian line, I have faced 6...d5 (page 300) instead of d6 or b6 approaches. Thoughts please?

I suggest 7 e3, usually to be followed by b2-b4, for example 7...c5 8 b4 Nc6 9 bxc5 Khenkin-Boehmer, Wiesbaden 2018. The early ...d7-d5 gives White’s dark-squared bishop more scope compared to the ...d7-d6 lines, but this is quite a rare line.

BTW, I’ve been reading the new book Game Changer by Matthew Sadler and Natasha Regan. The Anti-Nimzo features in 11 of the AlphaZero – Stockfish games, with AlphaZero scoring 5 wins and 6 draws. Stockfish played 6...d6 or 6...a5. Interesting stuff!

2. In the 1..e5 2..Bb4 line, Semkov expands on the line in the notes to game 12 after 3 Qc2 Nf6 4 Nf3 Bxc3 with the 9...dxc4 move shown in brackets. It seems fairly equal but your sense?

I still think the resulting endgame is easier to play for White, with the two bishops and some pressure. Although Black is close to equality if he follows the engine’s top moves, Black’s king manoeuvres (in the correspondence game quoted) don’t feel very natural to me.
If you would rather avoid trading queens, the main line 1 c4 e5 2 Nc3 Bb4 3 Nd5 is of course a good choice (with coverage in ChessPub Archives), although this involves a lot more knowledge.

3. After 1c4 e5 2 Nc3 Nf6 3 Nf3 d6 is quite a common reply with 4 e3 being met by Nbd7 5 d4 g6 6 Be2 Bg7 7 0-0 0-0 leading to the "poor man's KID" from Axel Smith's e3 Poison book

This move order is on page 109 of the book. After 4 d4, 4...e4 is covered in the notes, while after the most common reply 4...Nbd7, the move 5 e4 transposes to the Old Indian (pages 122-124).

I hope this helps!

David
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Krudos
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 14
Joined: 04/17/18
Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #47 - 01/27/19 at 15:37:26
Post Tools
Hi David

Can I follow on with a small number of questions:

1. In the Anti Nimzo-Indian line, I have faced 6...d5 (page 300) instead of d6 or b6 approaches. Thoughts please?

2. In the 1..e5 2..Bb4 line, Semkov expands on the line in the notes to game 12 after 3 Qc2 Nf6 4 Nf3 Bxc3 with the 9...dxc4 move shown in brackets. It seems fairly equal but your sense?

3. After 1c4 e5 2 Nc3 Nf6 3 Nf3 d6 is quite a common reply with 4 e3 being met by Nbd7 5 d4 g6 6 Be2 Bg7 7 0-0 0-0 leading to the "poor man's KID" from Axel Smith's e3 Poison book.

How would you suggest that White tackles this please?

I am now a subscriber so please feel free to point me to notes in the archives if that covers these questions.
Best wishes

Krudos
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5
Topic Tools
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo