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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Cummings Everyman English Repertoire (Read 53213 times)
MNb
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #92 - 06/08/20 at 08:03:40
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IM Cummings is completely right with "one of the most highly transpositional approaches", page 229, the chapter on the Anti QGD.

Page 231: 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e3 Nf6 4.Nf3 a6 (c5 5.cxd5 exd5 6.d4 c4!? is a line from the Caro-Kann, Panov Varistion with colours reversed) 5.b3 c5 6.cxd5 exd5 7.d4 Nc6 8.Bb2 Bg4 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Be2 O-O 11.O-O Re8 12.Rc1 Ba7 Aleksandrov-Levin, St. Petersburg 2011, actually began with

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 c5 5.Bd3 Nc6 6.Nf3 d5 7.O-O O-O 8.cxd5 (8.a3 is common) exd5 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.b3 Bg4 11.Bb2 a6 12.Rc1 Ba7 13.Be2.

Page 259: 1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.d4 d5 6.cxd5 exd5 (Nxd5 7.Bc4 cxd4 8.exd4 Bb4 and White has not managed to avoid this move - compare page 242 - but White has 9.Qd3) 7.Bb5 Bd6 (Ntirlis and GM Aagaard recommend 7...cxd4 in their book on the Tarrasch, page 258)  8.O-O O-O 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.b3 Bg4 11.Bb2 a6 "and 12.Bxc6! is White's best option here, since after 12.Be2 Qd6 13.Rc1 Rad1 Black keeps his dark-squared bishop on the a1-g7 diagonal" (IM Cummings, page 261).
The issue here is that the position after the inferior 12.Be2 is exactly the same as after 11.O-O in the sequence that would lead to the Aleksandrov-Levin game above, meanaing that 11...Qd6 12.Rac1 Rad8 mproves on 11...Re8 in that line.
  

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kylemeister
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #91 - 03/18/20 at 16:45:54
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Dubbelschaak wrote on 03/18/20 at 16:15:39:
I'm going with 7.d5

To my knowledge that has always been considered the standard reply, and as leading to some advantage for White.  For example here are some bits from Panczyk & Ilczuk in their Classical KID book of a while back.

7...Ne5 8. Nxe5 de 9. 0-0 e6 10. Bg5 h6 11. Be3 ed 12. cd Ne8 13. Qd2 Kh7 14. Rac1 ± M. Galyas-G. Meister, Hungarian Team Ch. 2005

7...Nb8 8. 0-0 c6 (8...Bg4 9. Be3 Nbd7 10. Nd4 Bxe2 11. Qxe2 Rc8 12. f4 += V. Bhat-H. Nakamura, US Chess League 2008) 9. Be3 Na6 10. h3 Nc5 11. Qc2 a5 12. Rfd1 += V. Popov-N. Nikolaev, Peterhof 2005

  
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Dubbelschaak
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #90 - 03/18/20 at 16:15:39
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Nevermind.

I'm going with 7.d5

So no need to reply to this and my previous post.
  
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Dubbelschaak
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #89 - 03/08/20 at 21:51:47
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Hello Mr. Cummings,

I'm still at it, your repertoire i mean, and enjoying it. Don't think i'll go back to playing 1.e4 anytime soon  Smiley

I have another question regarding the repertoire though.

Lately, when the game turns into a King's Indian, i've been running into 6...Nc6  Undecided

Is this some kind of anti-Petrosian line? How to keep it along Petrosian lines? I've been trying 7.d5 (but then i'm still facing Black's ...f5 kingside attack) and i've tried 7.O-O e5 8.d5 Ne7 9.Bg5 which doesn't really feel like i'm playing Petrosian's system even though i got to play Bg5.

What do you suggest?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #88 - 01/09/20 at 16:12:08
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The "modern" English with e3 as in Cummings' repertoire (and Georgiev/Semkov) doesn't have much in common with the g3 based setups that are in Kosten's book, IMHO.

For the latter, Marin's double Chessbase DVD may be useful. Sielecki should release a refreshed version of his c4 repertoire on Chessable soon.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #87 - 01/03/20 at 19:41:28
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Bedankt voor de link TD  Smiley
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #86 - 01/03/20 at 16:26:09
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Dubbelschaak wrote on 01/02/20 at 15:42:23:
Thanks again MW  Smiley

I'll put the book on my list.

https://www.deslegte.nl/the-dynamic-english-2000541/
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #85 - 01/02/20 at 15:42:23
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Thanks again MW  Smiley

I'll put the book on my list.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #84 - 01/02/20 at 01:23:48
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To conclude from me I would like to quote from a fantastic book on the English.....a little old (published 1999) and written by GM Tony Kosten.

It's the introduction to Chapter 7 -Other second moves for Black.

1 c4 e5 2 g3

"Here we deal with black second moves other than 2...Nf6 and 2....Nc6, which are quiet rare. In most cases, rather than trying to refute these moves (and possibly walking into the opponent's pet system), it is simpler, and more practical, to continue with Bg2 and Nc3 before deciding on the subsequent piece set-up."

Sound advice in 1999 and still sound advice today and one of the great advantages of the English.....if you know the strategic themes of the English you can, unlike many of the 1 e4 openings work your way through the opening without getting into too much trouble.

I know you are not keen on 2 g3 but if you are thinking of playing the English on an ongoing basis and can get your hands on a copy of Tony's The Dynamic English grab it.

It's only 140 pages but each chapter gives a little introduction about the strategy behind the line being analysed to guide the reader and what he says is still relevant today. IMHO it is still a must read books for any prospective English player.

All the best.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #83 - 01/01/20 at 23:37:13
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Syzygy wrote on 01/01/20 at 23:04:07:
It makes sense to compare this to the rare 1. e4 c5 2. c4, which is not considered to be a challenging response to the Sicilian. As Black, I like going for the Fischer set-up (as IM Cummings recommends), since the game will most likely transpose to a Symmetrical English where White has gone for an early Botvinnik set-up.

After 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 c5, White is effectively a tempo up on this variation. You could play the Fischer set-up with g3, e3, Nge2, etc. again, but remarkably it turns out that this probably not enough for an advantage. The positions are closed enough that a single tempo does not matter much.

The positions in the 4. e3 line are definitely sharp, but I think the jury is still out on whether White has an advantage there too. Besides these two options, I would like to recommend:

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 c5 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 g6 5. a3!

Aiming for a quick 6. b4. If Black continues developing normally, White can transpose to Marin's lines against the Botvinnik set-up for Black where White has managed to secure a favorable queenside expansion. If Black plays 5...a5, then you can continue with the Fischer set-up, since Black has weakened the b5 square before White has determined the placement of his kingside knight.

Thanks, i'll look into it  Smiley
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #82 - 01/01/20 at 23:04:07
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It makes sense to compare this to the rare 1. e4 c5 2. c4, which is not considered to be a challenging response to the Sicilian. As Black, I like going for the Fischer set-up (as IM Cummings recommends), since the game will most likely transpose to a Symmetrical English where White has gone for an early Botvinnik set-up.

After 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 c5, White is effectively a tempo up on this variation. You could play the Fischer set-up with g3, e3, Nge2, etc. again, but remarkably it turns out that this probably not enough for an advantage. The positions are closed enough that a single tempo does not matter much.

The positions in the 4. e3 line are definitely sharp, but I think the jury is still out on whether White has an advantage there too. Besides these two options, I would like to recommend:

1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 c5 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 g6 5. a3!

Aiming for a quick 6. b4. If Black continues developing normally, White can transpose to Marin's lines against the Botvinnik set-up for Black where White has managed to secure a favorable queenside expansion. If Black plays 5...a5, then you can continue with the Fischer set-up, since Black has weakened the b5 square before White has determined the placement of his kingside knight.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #81 - 01/01/20 at 22:37:28
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IMDavidCummings wrote on 01/01/20 at 19:32:15:
Hi,

After 1 c4 e5 2 Nc3 c5, I have two suggestions:

1) 3 g3 is a good move, and very logical after Black has left the gaping hole on d5. If you are looking for a simple solution for the (rare) occasions you’ll face 2...c5, I’d recommend the system with g3, Bg2, e3, Nge2, 0-0 etc. Depending on how Black develops, you can then either go for a d2-d4 break, or b2-b4 (prepared by a3 and Rb1). If Black advances his kingside pawns, you can usually counter with f2-f4. Also drop the c3-knight into d5 when it makes sense. There are other systems for White, of course, but this one should be a low maintenance option regardless of how Black continues.

2) 3 Nf3 Nc6 4 e3 Nf6 5 d4 e4 transposes into a line that is quite sharp and has its own body of theory. I’ve covered this in my Chess Publishing Updates, so if you are a subscriber, you can check the games to see if this appeals. The main moves now are 6 d5 (see Aronian - Vachier Lagrave, Grenke 2017) and 6 Ne5 (Mamedyarov - Vachier Lagrave, Biel 2018.)

Happy New Year to all!

David

Thank you for responding David, and happy new year to you too. I'll be looking into your suggestions  Grin
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #80 - 01/01/20 at 22:35:41
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GMTonyKosten wrote on 01/01/20 at 17:11:18:
MW wrote on 01/01/20 at 02:25:08:
In passing I have played 1 c4 on and off for close to 50 years and have never faced 1...e5 followed by 2....c5

Me neither, it looks too early to fix the structure like that.

Haha yes, but you're a grandmaster facing other masters who understand all that. I'm but a low rated amateur. And you have to deal with all sorts of stuff at my level  Cheesy
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #79 - 01/01/20 at 19:50:50
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Speaking of #1, I was reminded of Karpov playing an early ...e5 + ...c5 against Kasparov in their '87 match.
https://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1067247
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #78 - 01/01/20 at 19:32:15
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Hi,

After 1 c4 e5 2 Nc3 c5, I have two suggestions:

1) 3 g3 is a good move, and very logical after Black has left the gaping hole on d5. If you are looking for a simple solution for the (rare) occasions you’ll face 2...c5, I’d recommend the system with g3, Bg2, e3, Nge2, 0-0 etc. Depending on how Black develops, you can then either go for a d2-d4 break, or b2-b4 (prepared by a3 and Rb1). If Black advances his kingside pawns, you can usually counter with f2-f4. Also drop the c3-knight into d5 when it makes sense. There are other systems for White, of course, but this one should be a low maintenance option regardless of how Black continues.

2) 3 Nf3 Nc6 4 e3 Nf6 5 d4 e4 transposes into a line that is quite sharp and has its own body of theory. I’ve covered this in my Chess Publishing Updates, so if you are a subscriber, you can check the games to see if this appeals. The main moves now are 6 d5 (see Aronian - Vachier Lagrave, Grenke 2017) and 6 Ne5 (Mamedyarov - Vachier Lagrave, Biel 2018.)

Happy New Year to all!

David
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #77 - 01/01/20 at 17:11:18
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MW wrote on 01/01/20 at 02:25:08:
In passing I have played 1 c4 on and off for close to 50 years and have never faced 1...e5 followed by 2....c5

Me neither, it looks too early to fix the structure like that.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #76 - 01/01/20 at 14:57:15
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MW wrote on 01/01/20 at 02:25:08:
In passing I have played 1 c4 on and off for close to 50 years and have never faced 1...e5 followed by 2....c5...perhaps I've just been lucky!
 


Well i'm still not 100% certain i want to go 1.c4. I've been playing it online for like 2 weeks now and i'm faced with all sorts of responses that make me think you have to posess certain qualities in order to play 1.c4 correctly. You have to be really creative as well i think. I'm not sure if i posess such qualities. 1.e4 (the move i played before) seems much more straightforward. And i'm more of a straightforward kinda guy. When your opponent plays lines discussed in the book, i can handle myself pretty well. But when they respond with something weird looking i'm often left clueless  Embarrassed
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #75 - 01/01/20 at 02:25:08
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I'm also interested to hear what he has to say about the specific move order you suggest as I can't find it in his book..... The position can arise via the symmetrical variation with the moves, 1 c4  c5 2 Nc3 Nc6 3 Nf3 e5 when after 4 e3 Nf6 we reach the position you refer to above. It is a bit of a nuisance for white and probably why David avoids this in his book by playing 2 Nf3 when faced with the symmetrical so that he can play 3 d4 after 2....Nc6.

But 2 Nf3 is not possible in the 1...e5 line so why does black not play 2...c5 more often?

In your move order the d5 square looks very inviting for the white pieces so my first thought would be 3 g3 followed by Bg2, but now 4....f5 and it is not all that clear so let's see what he has to say.

In passing I have played 1 c4 on and off for close to 50 years and have never faced 1...e5 followed by 2....c5...perhaps I've just been lucky!
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #74 - 12/31/19 at 16:31:24
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Found it  Grin Thanks MW! Now for that other line i mentioned. Hope David will respond to that. But i'm pretty sure he's gonna recommend  a line with an early d4 since he tries to avoid g3 lines  in this book.

What would you play after 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 c5?

I want to try and avoid 3.g3 as well, so i'm looking at the following; 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 c5 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.e3 Nf6 5.d4  Smiley

But what if black plays 5...e4?

The main follow up is 6.Ne5. But Houdini like 6.Nd2 and 6.Ng5 a little better. It is probably just a nuance at such an early stage, but i'm not sure which i like best  Undecided

Is this discussed somewhere in the book? I just started reading it  Embarrassed
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #73 - 12/31/19 at 03:00:07
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Yes it's Chapter 4 .....2...Bb4 and other Second/Third Moves.

After the main move 2....Bb4  he gives two notes the first (a) pertains to 2...d6  and the second (b) to  2....f5.

It's a good book I still use it.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #72 - 12/30/19 at 21:18:43
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Yes ofcourse, 3.d4 vs 2...f5  Grin

I only have the eBook version for use with ChessBase, so i can't look up page numbers  Embarrassed

Is it part of a chapter? I can look up chapters.

  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #71 - 12/30/19 at 19:43:38
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I'm sure IM David Cummings will comeback to you regarding this question but in the interim if you look at page 104 note "b" of his book; at the top he offers 1c4 e5, 2 Nc3 f5, 3 d4 and follows the recommendation up with some analysis.

3 g3 is also a popular response according to the databases. 

Hope this helps.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #70 - 12/29/19 at 17:35:14
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Hello Mr. Cummings,

I recently decided on taking up your repertoire as i was getting kind of tired having to answer to each and every reply black threw at me after 1.e4. Anyway, i allready played some wonderfull games using your repertoire (winning most) and i really felt invigorated. Sure, there were some losses too, but they did not spoil the fun yet. I really think i am going to stick with your repertoire and become an English player  Smiley

I do have a couple of questions though, concerning rare moves. Mind you i'm just an amateur. My first question concerns the following line 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 c5  Huh i tried 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.e3 Nf6 5.d4 e4 6.Ne5 but i didn't really like the type of play i was getting. And since i didn't find it being discussed in your book, i was wondering what you recommend?

The same goes for 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 f5  Huh What do you recommend here?

I am leaning toward 3.g3 in both cases  Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: 12/29/19 at 23:04:36 by Dubbelschaak »  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #69 - 10/23/19 at 12:40:52
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The line you played transposes to the anti-QGD and is treated in the game Carlsen-Radjabov in the book.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #68 - 10/23/19 at 12:26:30
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JFugre wrote on 10/23/19 at 08:37:12:
Link doesn't seem to work.

I used the pgn tags, I guess they don't really work too well. A moderator now changed it to simple text.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #67 - 10/23/19 at 08:37:12
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Link doesn't seem to work.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #66 - 10/22/19 at 21:37:12
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1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. e3 Nc6 5. d4 d5 6. cxd5 exd5 7. Bb5 Bd6 8. dxc5
Bxc5 9. O-O *

Is this the repertoire of the book or did I go off track with 5.d4 ? I have the book but I am a little confused with the move order...
« Last Edit: 10/23/19 at 11:43:20 by GMTonyKosten »  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #65 - 09/14/19 at 09:03:03
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Very clear and helpful, thanks David.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #64 - 09/13/19 at 21:34:24
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Hi Krudos,

After (1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 d5 3 cxd5 Nxd5 4 Nf3 g6) 5 h4 h5 6 e4 Nxc3 7 dxc3 Qxd1+ 8 Kxd1 f6, if White develops along the lines of the Robson game, then I agree that this is OK for Black.
White can, however, improve with 9 e5!, planning Bf1-d3 to target the weakened g6-pawn. It looks like White is a bit better after that, since Black's kingside structure gets compromised.

David
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #63 - 08/27/19 at 07:18:14
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Hi David
I have been looking at the Pseudo Grünfeld with 5h4 and 6e4 ideas comparing it with 5e4. The theory for 5e4 I referenced is from July 2012 , the game Keklidze-Robson.

I would be interested in your thoughts of the line 5h4 h5 6e4 Nxc3 7dxc3 Qxd1+ 8Kxd1 f6 so using the Robson plan. It seems to be much better than playing 8.. Bg4 (the Forcen Esteban game on p315) and without the weaknesses after 5..h6 (p314 of your book).

Many thanks

Krudos
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #62 - 06/03/19 at 15:21:23
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1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Bb4 3.Qc2 Nf6 4.Nf3 d6

This was first played (at high level) at the blitz Wch end of last year, and Van Den Doel used it in the Belgian league 3 months ago.

The computer line now is: 5.Qa4+ Nc6 6.Nd5 Bc5 7.b4 Bb6 8.Nxb6 cxb6 9.b5 Na5

But I don't think white really has anything here. The offside knight looks good but it can be fixed with a6 and after e3 Bg4 we can't play Be2 so white's pawnstructure gets busted.

I don't see any improvements over the computer line, though.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #61 - 04/15/19 at 12:03:40
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Very useful post for me - thanks David
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #60 - 04/12/19 at 15:44:59
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Chess-Student,

In my opinion, the lines from the book that have developed the most are the 1.c4 e5 line and the anti-QGD setup. Both have seen many top-level games played over the last 2+ years. Here is a brief list of key games I have covered in ChessPub Updates. These include earlier game references and analysis in the notes.

After 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.e3 Bb4 5.Qc2, see:
5...d6 6.Ne2 Santos Ruiz-Kevlishvili, Belgium 2019,
5...Bxc3 6.Qxc3 Caruana-Ding Liren, Batumi 2018,
5...Bxc3 6.bxc3 So-Sevian, Douglas 2018

After 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.e3, see:
4...Be7 Nepomniachtchi-Bacrot, Batumi 2018
4...a6 Mamedyarov-Georgiadis, Biel 2018
4...b6 (by transposition) Moroni-Brunello, Salerno 2018

mn,

If Black adopts a “QID” approach (4...b6), a popular setup for White is to go for a double fianchetto rather than a classical Queen’s Indian. For example Nakamura-Ganguly, Kolkata 2018, went 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.b3 b6 5.Bb2 Bb7 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Nc3 Nbd7 8.Rc1 a6 9.d4 Bd6 10.g3 0–0 11.Bg2 Qe7 12.0–0 Rfe8 13.Nd2 Rad8 14.Qc2 c5 15.dxc5 bxc5 with a typical hanging pawns position. This structure is similar to that seen in Game 31 (Bosiocic-Caruana)  in Chapter 12 of my book. It is a useful setup to know if Black plays this solid system. See also the notes to Moroni-Brunello mentioned above.

David
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #59 - 04/06/19 at 22:45:22
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Dear mister Cummings and fellow subscribers.

I'm a new subscriber here and I'm trying transitioning from playing g3-lines a la Marin to lines with an early d4 according to your repertoire (I have your book).

I've noticed in some threads here you've been giving tips on newer recommendations as well as referencing some games here, but it's a not so easy for a new subscriber. I was wondering if perhaps you (or others) could write a list of which updated games are important to look through, to make it easier to get started.

Many thanks!
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #58 - 04/06/19 at 22:13:17
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Different question - I see in his Black Repertoire series Jan Gustafsson suggested [1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 e6 3 Nf3 d5 4 e3] 4...b6!?, which as far as I can tell isn't mentioned anywhere in Cummings' text. Does White have a reasonable way of avoiding the Classical [e3] Queen's Indian?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #57 - 02/14/19 at 00:10:19
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mn wrote on 02/13/19 at 17:25:01:
Ahhhh fair enough. But after 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4 3 e3, Black would normally avoid 3...c5 4 b4, and play 3...Nc6 instead, right?


Yep, I think 3...Nc6 just gives black a very comfortable game after 4 exd4 Nxd4 5 Nxd4 Qxd4 6 Nc3 c6....so if you want to play the Reti you really need to be prepared to go down the 3 b4 line...as a Reti player I can say 3 b4 leads to interesting games.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #56 - 02/13/19 at 17:34:38
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That's right. After 2.c4 d4 most players have been going 3.b4, which has built up a fair amount of theory. The alternatives (3.e3 and 3.g3) have been entirely de-fanged theoretically speaking. I don't know much about the line 2.e3 c5 3.c4 d4 4.b4, but I assume Black can make his choice between either accepting a pawn for adequate compensation or play 4...Nf6 with a decent position.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #55 - 02/13/19 at 17:25:01
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Ahhhh fair enough. But after 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4 3 e3, Black would normally avoid 3...c5 4 b4, and play 3...Nc6 instead, right?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #54 - 02/13/19 at 17:19:06
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Yes 3.c4 is an option too. I was (perhaps wrongly) assuming that you wanted to avoid reversed Benoni structures, due to your aversion to 2.c4 d4.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #53 - 02/13/19 at 16:10:18
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What about 3 c4, intending 3...d4 4 b4 and 3...e6 4 cd5 ed5 5 d4 - ?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #52 - 02/13/19 at 07:05:52
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mn wrote on 02/12/19 at 19:30:30:
Question:

So let's say I want to play something similar to Cummings' proposed repertoire, but I want to avoid both 1 c4 e5 and 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4. So I would play 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3 and 1 Nf3 Nf6 2 c4. What are the extra lines I'd need to add (particularly in 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3, which I have almost no experience with)?


The main one I think would be 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 c5. White then has couple of options:
1) 3.d4 with a probably transposition to the Panov-Botvinnik Caro-Kann after 3...cxd4 4.exd4 Nf6 5.c4. Here White would prefer to have played Nc3 than Nf3 but it's still playable.
2) 3.b3 with a Nimzo-Larsen where Black has played d5 and c5. The good news is that I believe most White 1.b3 players like to play against this line. The bad news is that you're playing a 1.b3 line and Black is fine.

Another way of looking at it is: do you want a reversed Tarrasch or Queen's Indian with an extra tempo?
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #51 - 02/12/19 at 19:30:30
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Question:

So let's say I want to play something similar to Cummings' proposed repertoire, but I want to avoid both 1 c4 e5 and 1 Nf3 d5 2 c4 d4. So I would play 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3 and 1 Nf3 Nf6 2 c4. What are the extra lines I'd need to add (particularly in 1 Nf3 d5 2 e3, which I have almost no experience with)?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #50 - 01/31/19 at 20:06:02
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Hi David

As ever, a very helpful reply.

On my last query, it was more how to respond if Black plays g6 and Bg7 rather than Be7? So on page 109 in the bracket for move 4, Black plays Nbd7 and then fianchettoes.

Perhaps there is possible transposition to the KID , page 353 , but Black has in addition the option to play exd4 ?

Best wishes

Krudos
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #49 - 01/31/19 at 08:50:28
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After a recent game I came across a transposition I don't think is covered. Hopefully I'm wrong and can be directed to the page!

I can't find mention of a Queen's Indian Defence set-up for Black. Specifically after 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e3 Nf6 4.Nf3 and now 4...b6!?. It's hard to see a good way for White to avoid a transposition to the e3 QID with a later d2-d4. For example 5.b3 Bb7 6.Bb2 Nbd7 7.d4 Bd6 8.Bd3 0-0 9.0-0 a6 (9...Re8!?) 10.Rc1 Qe7 11.Na4 dxc4 12.bxc4 Rad8!?

The lines covered are where Black puts the bishop less actively on e7.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #48 - 01/31/19 at 00:41:45
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Hi Krudos,

1. In the Anti Nimzo-Indian line, I have faced 6...d5 (page 300) instead of d6 or b6 approaches. Thoughts please?

I suggest 7 e3, usually to be followed by b2-b4, for example 7...c5 8 b4 Nc6 9 bxc5 Khenkin-Boehmer, Wiesbaden 2018. The early ...d7-d5 gives White’s dark-squared bishop more scope compared to the ...d7-d6 lines, but this is quite a rare line.

BTW, I’ve been reading the new book Game Changer by Matthew Sadler and Natasha Regan. The Anti-Nimzo features in 11 of the AlphaZero – Stockfish games, with AlphaZero scoring 5 wins and 6 draws. Stockfish played 6...d6 or 6...a5. Interesting stuff!

2. In the 1..e5 2..Bb4 line, Semkov expands on the line in the notes to game 12 after 3 Qc2 Nf6 4 Nf3 Bxc3 with the 9...dxc4 move shown in brackets. It seems fairly equal but your sense?

I still think the resulting endgame is easier to play for White, with the two bishops and some pressure. Although Black is close to equality if he follows the engine’s top moves, Black’s king manoeuvres (in the correspondence game quoted) don’t feel very natural to me.
If you would rather avoid trading queens, the main line 1 c4 e5 2 Nc3 Bb4 3 Nd5 is of course a good choice (with coverage in ChessPub Archives), although this involves a lot more knowledge.

3. After 1c4 e5 2 Nc3 Nf6 3 Nf3 d6 is quite a common reply with 4 e3 being met by Nbd7 5 d4 g6 6 Be2 Bg7 7 0-0 0-0 leading to the "poor man's KID" from Axel Smith's e3 Poison book

This move order is on page 109 of the book. After 4 d4, 4...e4 is covered in the notes, while after the most common reply 4...Nbd7, the move 5 e4 transposes to the Old Indian (pages 122-124).

I hope this helps!

David
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #47 - 01/27/19 at 15:37:26
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Hi David

Can I follow on with a small number of questions:

1. In the Anti Nimzo-Indian line, I have faced 6...d5 (page 300) instead of d6 or b6 approaches. Thoughts please?

2. In the 1..e5 2..Bb4 line, Semkov expands on the line in the notes to game 12 after 3 Qc2 Nf6 4 Nf3 Bxc3 with the 9...dxc4 move shown in brackets. It seems fairly equal but your sense?

3. After 1c4 e5 2 Nc3 Nf6 3 Nf3 d6 is quite a common reply with 4 e3 being met by Nbd7 5 d4 g6 6 Be2 Bg7 7 0-0 0-0 leading to the "poor man's KID" from Axel Smith's e3 Poison book.

How would you suggest that White tackles this please?

I am now a subscriber so please feel free to point me to notes in the archives if that covers these questions.
Best wishes

Krudos
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #46 - 09/29/18 at 20:54:56
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Excellent, many thanks David and much appreciated.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #45 - 09/29/18 at 17:00:50
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Krudos,

Thanks – great to hear the repertoire has been working for you!

Here are my thoughts on the lines you mention:

1. 1 c4 b6 2 Nc3 Bb7 3 e4 e5!?

Funny you should bring this up as I faced this in two tournament games this year! I suggest the setup 1 c4 b6 2 Nc3 Bb7 3 e4 e5 4 Nf3 Nc6 5 g3 Bc5 6 Bg2 d6 7 a3 a5 8 d3 Nge7 9 0–0 0–0 when a good model game is Kramnik - Morozevich, Moscow 2013.  Kramnik played 10 Nh4, and later got a strong attack after Kg1-h1 and f2-f4-f5.

2. How to meet the triangle set up for Black so e6, d5, c6 and delaying playing f5 until White has committed eg by Black playing Bd6 and /or Nd7

First of all, I don’t think delaying ...f5 for too long necessarily helps Black, for example 1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5 3 e3 c6 4 Nf3 Bd6 5 b3 Nd7 6 Bb2 f5 can be answered by 7 Qc2 Ngf6 8 cxd5! when Black has no good recapture since 8...exd5 gives up the f5-pawn, 8...Nxd5 drops the g7-pawn, while 8...cxd5 allows 9 Nb5.

Instead, after 1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5 3 e3 c6 4 Nf3 Bd6 5 b3 f5 6 Bb2 Nf6 I like the idea 7 cxd5!? exd5 8 g3 0–0 9 Bg2 Nbd7 (Gritsak-Koziak, Karpacz 2008) when after 10 Ne2 White has play against the Stonewall structure, with a safe king and two well-placed bishops.

3. 1 c4 e5 2 Nc3 Nf6 3 Nf3 Nc6 4 e3 Bb4 5 Qc2 d6.

This is covered in the book (page 53) but has developed a lot in the two years since the book was written. I now recommend the move 6 Ne2!? (instead of 6 Nd5). If you subscribe to the ChessPub Flank Openings section, you can refer to my analysis in the games Karjakin-Vidit and Duda-Eljanov.

Hope this helps.

David
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #44 - 09/29/18 at 11:23:23
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Can I thank the author for producing an excellent repertoire book. I have been playing this consistently and getting good positions and results.

Three questions about possible lines not covered:

1. 1 c4 b6 2 Nc3 Bb7 3 e4 e5!?

2. How to meet the triangle set up for Black so e6, d5, c6 and delaying playing f5 until White has committed eg by Black playing Bd6 and /or Nd7

3. 1c4 e5 2Nc3 Nf6 3 Nf3 Nc6 4 e3 Bb4 5Qc2 d6.

Thoughts as to how White can respond welcomed !

  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #43 - 07/28/18 at 10:24:14
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IMDavidCummings wrote on 01/28/18 at 22:19:48:
MNb
You make some great points in your analysis - I can’t cover everything in depth here but some thoughts

Thanks for the compliment and the feedback. Hopefully you do realize that my criticism comes from my background as a corr. player. So I may be a bit unfair, because your primary goal obviously was to offer a practical repertoire. However given 1.d4 (because of Grünfeld and Slav 4...dxc4) and 1.e4 (because of Najdorf, Sveshnikov and Berlin Wall) being theoretically equal I started to wonder if your book might serve as a starting point for proving an objective opening edge for White. This means your book is actually better than you intended.

IsaVulpes wrote on 07/27/18 at 15:46:37:
Is my impression correct, and this book *does* offer a theoretically testing & varied repertoire

My answer is largely yes. At some spots I think the repertoire could be more testing and everybody should read my comments on the book from that angle.
As almost always making the repertoire more testing means more work. For instance I don't buy IM Cummings' reply to my remarks on the Symmetrical Tarrasch. I maintain that it's a short cut, that thematically fits in the repertoire, but is not as testing as for instance the QGD Exchange Variation.
Having played the Classical Dutch for almost 20 years I've also learned not to fear the move Bg5. On the contrary, as soon as White plays it I start thinking about Black's winning chances. That includes specifically White castling queenside. Of course 1.c4 f5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 and 4.g3 is most testing.

The line that's bothering me most right now is 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.e3 Bb4 5.Qc2 Bxc3 6.bxc3 (I really don't like 6.Qxc3 Qe7 7.d4 Ne4 - see the diagram on page 71: isn't that Bishop lame on c1?) e4 7.Ng5 Qe7 8.f3 exf3 9.Nxf3 and now b6 iso d6.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #42 - 07/27/18 at 19:51:12
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IsaVulpes wrote on 07/27/18 at 15:46:37:
- Is my impression correct, and this book *does* offer a theoretically testing & varied repertoire that's a manageable enough amount of effort to qualify as a 2ndary weapon? In particular for "first round of a tournament"-occasions, it would be nice to have a calm starting move, rather than risking to run into some weird gambit lines I had no chance to look at
- Would the combination of the book with Montany's KID repertoire 'cover all my bases', or is there some other major-ish line that could do with some extra coverage / work on my own?
- How many of the lines would allow me to later (whenever I'm crazy enough) add 1.d4 lines via moveorder-switching? Say I'm not too interested in learning the Grünfeld and Slav anytime soon, but have a repertoire against the Nimzo and am a fan of the QGD Exchange, I could transpose via 1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.d4, if I gathered this correctly from the excerpt (I guess in this example I would also need a response to the Benoni, but that is part of the Montany Repertoire anyway?!). Does that stay true for the majority of this repertoire, or are there some lines where a transposition is ruled out very early on (aside from 1...e5 and 1...c5, of course)?

Thank you!


Well, for what I've seen in contents page, he recommends classical hedgehog and Maroczy setups, so you may prefer some more specific sources for these. It also means that your 'first round of a tournament' weapon may still result in mainstream theory if your opponent plays these systems as Black. There is also announced a similar book by Georgiev/Semkov and in relevant thread you can find further details about Cumming's repertoire: chesspub.com/cgi-bin/chess/YaBB.pl?num=1532334964/
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #41 - 07/27/18 at 15:46:37
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Based on the sample / some reviews, this book looks like "everything I ever wanted":
An alternative to 1.e4 to play around with (for 'broadening chess understanding' purposes and whatnot) and potentially use as surprise weapon in tournaments, which is interesting enough (so no system stuff, the c4/g3/Bg2 things I played in the past were just incredibly boring after a while) and theoretically testing, while not being another insurmountable amount of work on top of my main repertoire (as eg adding 1.d4 mainlines would be).

Given how large and popular a topic the entire King's Indian complex is, I don't ~really~ trust 35 pages to cover if sufficiently, but here I was thinking of buying the Sämisch repertoire by Montany anyhow, so that's not much of a bother.

So my questions at this point would be:
- Is my impression correct, and this book *does* offer a theoretically testing & varied repertoire that's a manageable enough amount of effort to qualify as a 2ndary weapon? In particular for "first round of a tournament"-occasions, it would be nice to have a calm starting move, rather than risking to run into some weird gambit lines I had no chance to look at
- Would the combination of the book with Montany's KID repertoire 'cover all my bases', or is there some other major-ish line that could do with some extra coverage / work on my own?
- How many of the lines would allow me to later (whenever I'm crazy enough) add 1.d4 lines via moveorder-switching? Say I'm not too interested in learning the Grünfeld and Slav anytime soon, but have a repertoire against the Nimzo and am a fan of the QGD Exchange, I could transpose via 1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.d4, if I gathered this correctly from the excerpt (I guess in this example I would also need a response to the Benoni, but that is part of the Montany Repertoire anyway?!). Does that stay true for the majority of this repertoire, or are there some lines where a transposition is ruled out very early on (aside from 1...e5 and 1...c5, of course)?

Thank you!
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #40 - 01/28/18 at 22:19:48
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Thanks for all the feedback on the book! I’m combining responses to a few posts here.

MNb
You make some great points in your analysis - I can’t cover everything in depth here but some thoughts:

1) After 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 f5 3.d4 exd4 4.Qxd4, the move 4...Nc6 is Black’s most common move by far, although I agree that 4...Nf6 is more solid. Here I suggest 5.g3 Nc6 6.Qe3+ Be7 7.Bg2 0–0 8.Nh3 transposing to Kramnik-Bacrot (given in the ChessPub Flank Archives), which should give White a slight edge.

2) 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.e3 f5 4.d4 Nf6 and now I suggest 5.d5 Ne7 6.Nf3 d6 7.Be2 with a typical line being 7...g6 8.0–0 Bg7 9.b4 transposing to the Chuchelov-Engelbert reference on page 108.

3) In the Dutch after 1. c4 f5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d4 e6 4. Qc2 b6 5. Bg5 Bb7 6. e3 Bb4 I would suggest quick long castling with 7. Nge2 O-O 8.O-O-O when I prefer White’s long term attacking prospects.

4) I wouldn’t say that the Anti-Queen’s Gambit repertoire is just the Symmetrical Tarrasch, although that is obviously a big part of it. Many players that play the QGD as Black (myself included!) aren’t necessarily well-versed in the Tarrasch or comfortable defending a setup with an IQP. The game Karjakin-Anand in the book shows an important line that stays within Flank Opening territory, with similar themes to the Anti-Slav system. There is a lot of scope for originality here, for example the recent game Nepo-Anand (London Classic 2017) saw 1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. e3 a6 5. b3 Bd6N 6. Bb2 0–0 7. g4!? etc.

a) When Black plays an early ...a6, as you pointed out, there are some suggested lines given on pages 231-232.  In general, my aim as White is to fianchetto the c1-bishop and get a stable position to fight against Black’s IQP. A key point is that this is much harder for Black to achieve in the reverse colours scenario. BTW, Gelfand-Khenkin quoted in the notes is a good thematic example.

b) In the other line you give: 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.b3 0–0 6.Bb2 c5 7.cxd5 exd5 8.d4 Nc6 on p236 I give notes supporting 9.Be2 which has scored 65% for White (in Megabase).  Here a nice, more recent game is Adhiban-Salomon, WchT 2017. In my view the inclusion of Bf1-b5 is not vital for White’s success, in Carlsen-Radjabov it was the best option because of the specific move-order in that line.

I agree an additional annotated game would have helped expand on this setup – if there is ever a second edition I will include one!  Smiley

ErictheRed
Absolutely, the repertoire is compatible with any main line King’s Indian where White plays e2-e4. Also, congrats on your book!

After 1 c4 e5, the 4 e3 Four Knights does indeed share some themes with the Taimanov Sicilian, although I believe the extra tempo makes a big difference. There have been some recent developments in top-level games (e.g. Aronian-Matlakov and Karjakin-Vidit) which I’ve covered in my ChessPub column.

leavenfish
In the Old Indian section, you have a good point that the long forcing line isn’t strictly necessary. Instead 11.Bf1 Nhf4 12 Ne2 defuses Black’s kingside play, and looks pleasant for White.


David
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #39 - 01/26/18 at 11:48:38
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Demuth in his Reti book does much the same if I remember correctly (I don't have the book at hand). There has to be a decent alternative, but maybe it is the best try?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #38 - 01/25/18 at 23:00:47
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I might take up some of these lines myself, just for variety.  As a long time Taimanov player, I already play similar positions with colors reversed.  I had a quick look at the store the other day and the book seemed very good.  I could still play my beloved Samisch against the King's Indian, as well!

So for me, this would mostly be something new to use against Slav and Grunfeld players, which I've been looking for (though I've always done well with 4.Nf3 and 5.Bg5 against the Grunfeld).
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #37 - 01/25/18 at 22:05:13
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Being a corr. player and tired of the Najdorf plus Berlin Wall and also of the Grünfeld and the Slav I wondered if 1.c4 would suit me. So recently I bought the book for inspiration.
It does some excellent work on the Grünfeld and the Slav problem. Also my skepticism regarding 1.c4 e5 and 5.Qc2 is well met. Still I have three minor complaints and one biggie.

1. Against the GPA with colours reversed 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 f5 (not mentioned in the Index of Variations; it's on page 104) the recommendation is the usual 3.d4 taking advantage of the extra tempo (compare 1.e4 c5 2.f4 d5 3.exd5 Qxd5 4.Nc3) with exd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6?! 5.Qe3+.  Unfortunately Black can improve as Qd4 doesn't exactly run away. After 4...Nf6 intending 5...Nc6 it's much harder to prove anything for White.

2. The book doesn't mention 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.e3 f5 4.d4 Nf6 (this is very much like the Hebden Variation of the Sicilian GPA: 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 e6 3.f4 d5 4.Nf3).

3. The interesting recommendation against the Dutch is 1.c4 f5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.d4 e6 (the Anti-Leningrad system 3...d6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.Qc2 g6 6.h4 is very much to my taste) 4.Qc2. Imo best is b6 and after 5.Bg5 Bb7 6.e3 the transposition Bb4. Then the bishop is not optimally placed on g5. Compare 7.f3 (after 5.Nf3 Black wins the fight for square e4) O-O 8.Bd3 c5 9.Nge2 Nc6 10.a3 cxd4 with 4.e3 b6 5.Bd3 Bb7 6.f3 Bb4 7.Qc2 O-O 8.Nge2 c5 9.a3 cxd4 10.axb4 (page 383 via transposition).

4. My main complaint is that the Anti-Queen's Gambit System is not an Anti-Queen's Gambit system at all - it's just the Symmetrical Tarrasch. Granted, the book recommendation 7.Bb5 of Carlsen-Radjabov, Stavanger 2013 is a NID, Rubinstein Variation with colours reversed. The extra tempo must count for something; clever. However the important possibility (the words of author himself, page 232) 1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nc3 e6 4.e3 d5 (page 129) 5.cxd5 exd5 6.d4 a6 7.b3 (7.g3 is the other option, but Black can avoid it via 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.e3 Nf6 4.Nf3 a6 5.b3 c5 6.cxd5 exd5 7.d4 Nc6) Nc6 8.Bb2 (page 231) doesn't get much attention. It's not even mentioned in the Index of Variations. Imo the author should have included another entire annotated game for this specific line. This becomes even more urgent on page 235, the note 7...exd4 8.d4 Nc6 9.Be2 "similar to Carlsen-Radjabov" (see just above). Well, the bishop being on e2 iso b5 makes quite a difference; worse, with this specific move order 9.Bb5 (iso the recommended 9.Be2) does not necessarily transpose. And of course there is 8...a6 again. It's true that in the Symmetrical Tarrasch Black usually plays ...Bd6 iso ...Be7, but as soon as White plays the common dxc5 that doesn't matter anymore. If we also realize that in a way White is playing against his/her own variation (the Semi-Tarrasch with ...Nxd5), as  the author remarks on page 259, there is quite some food for thought here.
Of course corr. players don't really need shortcuts like the Symmetrical Tarrasch. 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 (or 2.Nf3) d5 3.d4 and 1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.e4 are respectable options. It also means allowing the NID though with 1.c4 c5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nc3 e6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 Bb4 and I'm not sure if that one has enough punch for a corr. game. It's this or 4.e3 d5 5.cxd5 exd5 6.d4 a6 7.g3.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #36 - 10/25/17 at 20:32:23
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Can you give the moves leading up to this position?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #35 - 10/25/17 at 16:31:26
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It appears on this forum at least that I may be the first to notice something:

In the 'Old Indian' section, Cummings gives 'forcing line' by Demuth which begings with 11. Ne5!? concluding "and White is playing for two rsults, with Rook and two minor pieces for the queen and 2 pawns".

However, that may be a bit misleading. Formally the count is correct, but as Black has not traded his Ra8 yet...perhaps he need not and can make use of it or trade it under more favorable circumstances?

Sorry, have the electronic version, not sure what page it is on.

In any case, White is not exactly better...and that helper for the Queen should not be discounted.

And in the line suggested, Black could opt for 13...dc3 which is pretty equal.

I would suggest not going into the line: White is better developed, has a better center....why opt for that line?

If White really wants to play for two results in that line....19 Qe3 would seem to be the way to go about it.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #34 - 09/30/17 at 14:13:06
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I can say that at beginning I did not like the variations of the book but now reading also what the "e3 poisson" suggests I suggest it
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #33 - 09/05/17 at 20:27:53
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I agree with Canadian Club. There is certainly some venom is what Cummings suggests, and the positions are non-standard for what some black players might be expecting.

However, there is a decent amount of work involved in getting to play this stuff competently. There are a variety of structures: e.g. reversed Sicilian Taimanov type structures, KIDs, Maroczy Binds, play with and against the IQP.

Good book though. Definitely happy to recommend.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #32 - 09/04/17 at 10:10:35
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I have the book. I got it because of some anti lines (slav or qgd or grunfeld...). The book is very good, imho. The big plus of theese lines is that black players are not so uses to face theese e3 lines., and in a world where all the normal openings are equal, this is a real plus.

Playable? Of course. Great advantage? If Black knows what he is doing, not much. An edge even in theoretically equal or +/= positions? For sure. There are more venom that it seems in the lines suggested by Mr Cummings.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #31 - 09/03/17 at 18:00:27
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Hello guys!

How well did you fare in practice using repertoire carved by IM Cummings?

From 1 to 5, how many stars would you appoint to the book, and why?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #30 - 02/27/17 at 17:50:32
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Mr TopNotch: as a reader and follower of some of your own suggestions here (and elsewhere) and with all proper respect, do you feel a player of Black 1 .... e5 should purchase this book to fill in some new areas that may be presented?

OR: Are there serious improvements in the non-g3 lines that should worry Black?

Thank you for your time and consideration on this matter.

Smiley

  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #29 - 02/25/17 at 22:51:27
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IMDavidCummings wrote on 02/20/17 at 15:17:47:
Hi TopNotch,

Thanks for your feedback on the book and for highlighting the KID move-order issue in your earlier post. I’ve been mulling over this line and wanted to post some thoughts and a recommendation.

After 1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 g6 3 e4 d6 4 d4 Bg7 5 Nf3 0-0 6 Be2 Na6 7 0-0, the move 7...c6 was championed by GM Glek in the late 90s/early 2000s and played occasionally by others. It is indeed rare (played in around 5% of games after 7 0-0), but I agree it is helpful to give advice on what to do if Black delays ...e7-e5. Now White often plays 8 Be3 or 8 Re1 which usually transpose to mainline 6...Na6 lines – if White was prepared to enter those anyway there is less incentive to vary.

White actually has a wide choice of other decent moves however, for example 8 h3, 8 Qc2 and 8 Rb1, but the one I like is 8 Bf4!?. This is an unusual placement for the bishop in the KID, but is justified by the knight on a6. If Black wants to play ...e7-e5 he needs to move  the f6-knight, meanwhile White will develop quickly by playing Qd1-d2 and centralizing the rooks. In the game Shchekachev-Glek (St. Petersburg 1998), Black played 8...Nh5 but ended up worse. Later, he tried 8...Nd7 in Chuchelov-Glek (Bad Zwesten 2000) and Hoffmann-Glek (Bundesliga 2004) but White was again slightly better from the opening. Also, in MegaBase, there are some instructive annotations by King and Chuchelov to the first two of these games.

David


Thanks for your reply David, somehow I figured you would settle on the very interesting 8.Bf4!? as your recommendation as it seems to best fit the ethos of your book, while at the same time avoiding many tricky theoretical transpositions to lines not covered after 7...Na6.

Kudos on a very well written, fresh and instructive repertoire book which hopefully will prove an excellent companion to the soon to be released e3 poison by Quality Chess.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #28 - 02/24/17 at 23:49:39
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There is nothing wrong with the Mikenas (I've covered it several times in the Chess Publishing Flank Updates), but in the book I recommend the Anti-Nimzo system 1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 e6 3 Nf3 Bb4 4 Qc2. I believe this offers White a good game, and usually a clear theme of playing to exploit the two bishops, but with less memorization of concrete lines than the Mikenas.

As noted, if Black wants to play a QGD structure, he can play 1...e6 and 2...d5, so White needs to have an answer for this in any case.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #27 - 02/24/17 at 22:35:13
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TN wrote on 02/21/17 at 03:31:34:
I imagine the logic is that after 1.c4 e6, 2.Nc3 d5 move orders Black out of the Mikenas


It does, but Black could also play 1. c4 Nf6, 2. Nc3 e6, reaching the Mikenas. Cummings then recommends 3. Nf3, which could transpose to his anti-QG line after 3...d5 (instead of 3...Bb4). I assume that using both lines would be more cumbersome. That being said, for someone who plans to play the QGD exchange, as I do, the Mikenas would seem to be fairly good for White.
I was basically curious to know if there are any concerns in Cummings' (or yours or anyone else's) with playing the Mikenas these days.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #26 - 02/21/17 at 03:31:34
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Marcellus wrote on 02/20/17 at 18:07:20:
A quick question on the repertoire for IM Cummings (I've purchased the ebook version from Everyman): your move order permits the Mikenas Attack, but you avoid it by attempting to transpose into your preferred line vs the QGD. Did you avoid the Mikenas for reasons of economy, or do you not like it (and if so, why)?


I imagine the logic is that after 1.c4 e6, 2.Nc3 d5 move orders Black out of the Mikenas,  while 2.Nf3 f5 move orders Black out of the recommended counter to the Dutch. In any case, Adams demonstrated an interesting alternative to the repertoire in his recent game against Salem:

  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #25 - 02/20/17 at 18:07:20
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A quick question on the repertoire for IM Cummings (I've purchased the ebook version from Everyman): your move order permits the Mikenas Attack, but you avoid it by attempting to transpose into your preferred line vs the QGD. Did you avoid the Mikenas for reasons of economy, or do you not like it (and if so, why)?
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #24 - 02/20/17 at 17:52:02
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Incidentally 8. Bf4 is also the move pointed at by Panczyk/Ilczuk in their Classical KID book of 2009, with similar comments (a rather unusual post, but ...) and citing Chuchelov-Glek. 
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #23 - 02/20/17 at 15:17:47
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Hi TopNotch,

Thanks for your feedback on the book and for highlighting the KID move-order issue in your earlier post. I’ve been mulling over this line and wanted to post some thoughts and a recommendation.

After 1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 g6 3 e4 d6 4 d4 Bg7 5 Nf3 0-0 6 Be2 Na6 7 0-0, the move 7...c6 was championed by GM Glek in the late 90s/early 2000s and played occasionally by others. It is indeed rare (played in around 5% of games after 7 0-0), but I agree it is helpful to give advice on what to do if Black delays ...e7-e5. Now White often plays 8 Be3 or 8 Re1 which usually transpose to mainline 6...Na6 lines – if White was prepared to enter those anyway there is less incentive to vary.

White actually has a wide choice of other decent moves however, for example 8 h3, 8 Qc2 and 8 Rb1, but the one I like is 8 Bf4!?. This is an unusual placement for the bishop in the KID, but is justified by the knight on a6. If Black wants to play ...e7-e5 he needs to move  the f6-knight, meanwhile White will develop quickly by playing Qd1-d2 and centralizing the rooks. In the game Shchekachev-Glek (St. Petersburg 1998), Black played 8...Nh5 but ended up worse. Later, he tried 8...Nd7 in Chuchelov-Glek (Bad Zwesten 2000) and Hoffmann-Glek (Bundesliga 2004) but White was again slightly better from the opening. Also, in MegaBase, there are some instructive annotations by King and Chuchelov to the first two of these games.

David
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #22 - 02/20/17 at 00:00:03
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CaptainCarrot wrote on 02/13/17 at 21:22:49:
Stigma wrote on 02/13/17 at 20:18:42:
Has anyone had a chance to study this and try out the lines yet?

I'm thinking of picking it up for the KID and Symmetrical English parts (I don't play 1.c4 much). In particular, are Cummings' Symmetrical English lines compatible with a 1.Nf3 move order?


Yes it's compatible with the 1.Nf3 move order, as he recommends 1.c4 c5 2.Nf3


As posted, there are important gaps in his coverage.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #21 - 02/13/17 at 21:22:49
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Stigma wrote on 02/13/17 at 20:18:42:
Has anyone had a chance to study this and try out the lines yet?

I'm thinking of picking it up for the KID and Symmetrical English parts (I don't play 1.c4 much). In particular, are Cummings' Symmetrical English lines compatible with a 1.Nf3 move order?


Yes it's compatible with the 1.Nf3 move order, as he recommends 1.c4 c5 2.Nf3
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #20 - 02/13/17 at 20:18:42
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Has anyone had a chance to study this and try out the lines yet?

I'm thinking of picking it up for the KID and Symmetrical English parts (I don't play 1.c4 much). In particular, are Cummings' Symmetrical English lines compatible with a 1.Nf3 move order?

I've been looking at The Fianchetto Solution, but am struggling to find any mention of what happens if Black plays it like (any kind of) Symmetrical English in that book.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #19 - 01/25/17 at 16:41:39
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I like this book by Mr. Cummings, it is refreshing divergence from the usual 1.c4 followed by g3 offerings. However I noticed in the KID section that the following move order was missing: 1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 g6 3.e4 d6 4.d4 Bg7 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Be2 Na6 7.0-0 and now the book does not consider 7...c6, which poses some problems for readers following this repertoire. Essentially black holds back e5 for a move and White now has to think for himself, and before someone comments that c6 is rare, let me add that this move has been used by very strong players and it usually transposes to the normal 6...Na6 lines, however the recommended Petrosian setup is no longer viable. 

Perhaps Everyman will publish an update to rectify this omission in the future.

Regards,

Tops Smiley
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #18 - 12/24/16 at 14:41:25
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While I also enjoy the options to transpose to non-fianchetto 1.d4 variations the variation 1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 Bb4 5.Qc2 worries me. With colours reversed White does extremely well: compare 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.Nc3 Nc6 4.Bb5 Qc7 5.O-O Nf6.
Indeed drawing rate is high in the 4.Bb4 5.Qc2 variation.
  

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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #17 - 12/23/16 at 18:55:25
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befuddled wrote on 12/13/16 at 18:44:03:
Just ordered this today. Hee hee!


I have order too! I hope to received it as soon as possible!
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #16 - 12/13/16 at 18:44:03
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Just ordered this today. Hee hee!
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #15 - 11/25/16 at 10:30:51
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PDF extract is up. Looks good!

In short, there is no early g3, which facilitates transpositions to d4. I have to say that I'm happy to see opportunities to transpose to non-fianchetto d4 lines. This seems to crop up in the suggested repertoire, with transpositions into the semi-Tarrasch and Petrosian King's Indian.

Looks great from the extract. I'll likely wait until the eBook is released before pulling the trigger.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #14 - 11/24/16 at 23:51:48
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Why not take advantage of the central majority straight away with [1 c4 d5?! 2 cxd5 Qxd5] 3 Nc3 followed by d4 and e4? If 3...Qa5, then simply 4 d4 Nf6 5 Nf3 and then Bd2 at some point looks like it gives White a big advantage.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #13 - 11/24/16 at 18:37:29
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Nc3 can't be stopped and will be played sooner or later winning a tempo. The question was whether to fianchetto or not in this open position.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #12 - 11/24/16 at 18:26:57
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In the case of 1. c4 d5 2. cd Qxd5, I wonder why you wouldn't be inclined to play 3. Nc3.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #11 - 11/24/16 at 17:56:07
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IM Cummings, out of interest does the book have a line against 1.c4 d5? Probably not very good but potentially annoying. I would probably play 2.cxd5 and aim for g3 gaining a tempo sooner or later on the Queen on d5. Potentially this doesn't fit in the books idea of not fianchettoing so curious to see what is recommended.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #10 - 11/21/16 at 23:36:21
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Basing an English repertoire product on non-g3 lines?  Having White transpose to other major openings (not English/Reti*) in a number of cases?  The horror!
(OK, that's what I imagine some will think, but not me.)


*random historical tidbit:  I was reminded of the late American IM Kim Commons referring to "my usual English-Reti junk."
« Last Edit: 11/22/16 at 05:26:20 by kylemeister »  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #9 - 11/21/16 at 21:09:45
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MartinC wrote on 11/21/16 at 21:02:20:
That's a good thing surely? Gives you options Smiley

That's true, but I don't like those options. Besides 1.c4 is most of the time not my first move... Wink
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #8 - 11/21/16 at 21:02:20
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That's a good thing surely? Gives you options Smiley
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #7 - 11/21/16 at 18:48:59
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Unfortunately not my repertoire.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #6 - 11/21/16 at 16:58:25
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gillbod wrote on 11/16/16 at 16:27:01:
Is it going to be via a Kosten move order, or will a knight come out before g3?


When I read this I thought something like, "Well of course White doesn't have to go for g3 in the English, but I suppose the book will probably have him doing so."
I was wrong of course ...
https://www.everymanchess.com/downloadable/download/sample/sample_id/129/


  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #5 - 11/20/16 at 21:32:31
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Thanks for your interest in the book!

It has been sent to the printer so should be on track for the schedule quoted by gillbod.

I'm also told that the PDF excerpt will be posted on the Everyman website soon.
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #4 - 11/17/16 at 17:15:51
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Actually, the answer to when is quite answerable: Everyman lists the book as coming out this December in Europe, and Feb in the US. Pretty soon!
  
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #3 - 11/17/16 at 09:45:12
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Q When?
A Be patient readers. When it comes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLxqRax8mTA
  
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RoleyPoley
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #2 - 11/16/16 at 18:01:19
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gillbod wrote on 11/16/16 at 16:27:01:
I was somewhat surprised to see that Chesspubs resident Flank specialist will be publishing a repertoire book with Everyman very shortly (https://www.everymanchess.com/opening-repertoire-the-english).

I thought I'd make a thread to discuss it. Any hints from the author as to its contents would be greatly appreciated! Is it going to be via a Kosten move order, or will a knight come out before g3?

Either way, I'll likely just buy this---I have yet to be let down by a chesspub authored book.


He wrote a book on the Symmetrical English 10 about 15 years ago.

Everyman's opening repertoire series has been quite good so far. Can't think of a book in that series that has not been of a high standard or failed to provide good verbal explanations throughout.

  

"As Mikhail Tal would say ' Let's have a bit of hooliganism! '"

Victor Bologan.
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TD
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Re: Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
Reply #1 - 11/16/16 at 16:48:54
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Great news! Smiley
  
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gillbod
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Cummings Everyman English Repertoire
11/16/16 at 16:27:01
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I was somewhat surprised to see that Chesspubs resident Flank specialist will be publishing a repertoire book with Everyman very shortly (https://www.everymanchess.com/opening-repertoire-the-english).

I thought I'd make a thread to discuss it. Any hints from the author as to its contents would be greatly appreciated! Is it going to be via a Kosten move order, or will a knight come out before g3?

Either way, I'll likely just buy this---I have yet to be let down by a chesspub authored book.
  
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