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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) C09 : 3... c5 4.exd5 exd5 IQP strategy (Read 12720 times)
ReneDescartes
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Re: 3... c5 4.exd5 exd5 IQP strategy
Reply #2 - 02/17/17 at 17:07:05
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Mednis has a large chapter on this in his "Strategic Themes in Endgames." He goes over some of the classic opening variations using explanations about things like which piece exchanges and which minor piece endgames are most and least favorable, and he analyzes the games through to endgames, about half of which are about how Black holds his own in thematic ways.

Baburin also has a chapter  on this structure ("Play on the e-file") in Winning Pawn Structures. He focuses on White when it arises with colors reversed (e.g. 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.e3 e5 4.Bxc4 exd4 5.exd4, some of the the main lines of the Lasker and Orthodox Queen's Gambit after Black plays ...e5, the c3-Sicilian, and the Monte Carlo French, all of which are places to look for more coverage). A lot of the ideas seen with an e-pawn opposing the IQP in the book's other chapters are also relevant here with the c-pawn, and some, though a minority, of the games feature the c-pawn structure.

Sokolov also has a section in Winning Chess Middlegames on this structure (section 2.9). And of course many of the pawn structure transformations in the e-pawn lines can also come from the c-pawn lines.

Honestly, I think what can be stated as general rules here is probably stuff you already know. The thing is to see how the piece play works around the stuff you know, and that can best be done from looking at a lot of games.

I used to play 3...Nf6. Now I enjoy this line more.  In my experience, a lot of White players think of the French devotee as preferring closed positions and don't expect it. I think they are, strange as it may sound, a little intimidated. They know this has the rich history of a fundamental main line and they know they're not too booked on it--they are used to the 3...Nf6,3...Be7, and 3...c5 4.exd5 Qxd5 positions recommended by all just-French repertoire books to date. But with my modest talent I'm not exactly playing grandmasters all the time.
  
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MartinC
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Re: 3... c5 4.exd5 exd5 IQP strategy
Reply #1 - 02/15/17 at 09:41:17
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Like he said I think, there's an awful lot of games in such things by some very strong Russian specalists. So stare at those.

If you want to get depressed then go and play through a bunch of games by Adams on the white side.
  
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nocteus
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C09 : 3... c5 4.exd5 exd5 IQP strategy
02/14/17 at 19:41:46
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Hi, I have been interested in the black side of the isolani in the Tarrasch. There was a nice quote on the forum by Phil Adams:

Quote:
GM Jaan Ehlvest wrote in The Story of a Chess Player: "This is the kind of position where you cannot get help from FRITZ. To play these positions well you must study in depth such games as those in the aforementioned match between Karpov and Korchnoi as well as those in another famous match between Spassky and Petrosian in 1969, where Spassky played the Tarrasch defense. The Russian-American GM Anatoly Lein is also a big specialist in how to handle the isolated pawn. It is not easy to handle – this is why Karpov and Kasparov often avoided these kinds of positions throughout their careers. On the other hand it is true that these positions are for lazy boys. You are not in danger ever as long as you know the general rules of handling them. In the 1974 match, Korchnoi drew all his games against Karpov in the French, and immediately lost two crucial games when he tried to surprise Karpov with another opening.


Problem is: what are 'the general rules' of handling this kind of IQP? Any tip or book to recommend?

Books only cover the IQP with the pawn on e3-e6 for the defending side, which leads to a different piece play: the time invested in developping the queen's bishop can be used dynamically by the opponent, exchanges are harder with the e-column closed, a pawn wedge on e5 (after Ne5 ?xe5 dxe5) can be strong since it cannot be attacked by a Re8, etc.

Thanks!
« Last Edit: 03/13/17 at 18:43:42 by dom »  
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