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Normal Topic B v B Spassky - R.Byrne, m(6) 1974 (Read 2099 times)
an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: B v B Spassky - R.Byrne, m(6) 1974
Reply #4 - 07/05/17 at 15:25:42
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RE: 57.d6+!, I should learn to click on that little chip icon before clicking on the post button. Analyzing with the engine takes the fun out of chess for me, but as a blunder-check it is useful.

RE: 60...Kd5, I blanked out on ...Ke4, and only thought of ...Ke6. But perhaps white does not have to allow it. After 58...Bb2, white can play 59.Bc5 (here again!) 59...Kc7 60.Be3 (of course 60.d6+ still works) 60...Bf6 61.Ke2 Bd8 62.Kd3 Kd6 63.Kc4 etc. Also right at the beginning 57.Ba3 stops this ...Bb2-c1+ idea of black.
  
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Re: B v B Spassky - R.Byrne, m(6) 1974
Reply #3 - 07/05/17 at 09:04:37
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 07/05/17 at 04:27:44:
60. Be3 Kc7
( 60... Kxd5 almost draws 61. Bxb6 Kc4 62. Bxa7 Kxb5 63. Bb8 Kxa6 64. Be5 Ba3 65. Bf6!
( 65. Kg3 Be7 66. Bg7 Kb5 67. Bh6 h4+! 68. Kf3 Kc4 69. Bg5 Bxg5! 70. fxg5 Kd5 71. Kf4 Ke6 = )
65... Kb5
( 65... Bb4 66. Ke3 ( 66. Kg3 Be1+ ) 66... Kb5 67. Kd4 Kc6 68. Ke5 +- )
66. Kg3 Bd6 67. Bg5 Kc6 68. Kh4 +- )

Thanks for sharing. It seems that 60...Kxd5 was sufficient for a draw (68...Kd5 69.Kxh5 Ke4 etc.).

And after 56...Kc7? (instead of 56...Bd8) White could have earned faster laurels, suggests the PC: 57.d6+! Kc8 58.Bxb6! followed by a king's march. Nice!
  
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Re: B v B Spassky - R.Byrne, m(6) 1974
Reply #2 - 07/05/17 at 04:27:44
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Thanks. I used to own that book, but in those days I only looked at openings.

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39. f4 exf4 40. gxf4 Ke8 41. Kxd4 Kd7 42. Kd3 Kc7 43. Bc3 Bh4
44. Ke2 Bg3 45. Kf3 Bh4 46. Bg7 Be1 47. Bf8 Ba5 48. Bg7 Kd7
49. Bd4 Kc7 50. Bf2 Bc3 51. Kg3 Bf6 52. Be1 Kc8 53. Bb4 Kc7
54. Ba3 Kd7 55. c5 dxc5 56. Bxc5

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56... Kc7
Byrne gave the wrong plan. The wK should go to the center.
57. Bb4 Kd7 58. Kf3
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Here black has three tries.
(a) Trade bishops.
(b) Play first ...h5-h4 then try to trade bishops.
(c) Leave the P on h5 and hang tough.

(a) 58... Be7 59. Bxe7 Kxe7 60. Kg3! Kd6 61. Kh4 Kxd5 62. Kxh5 Kc5 63. Kg6 Kxb5 64. h4 Kxa6 65. h5 +-

(b) 58... h4
White has more than one way to win now.
59. Ke3 Be7 60. Bd2 Bf6 61. Kd3 Kd6 62. Kc4 Kc7
( 62... Kd7 63. Be3 Kc7 64. Bf2 zugzwang Be7 65. Bd4 Bd6 66. Be5 Kd7 67. Bxd6 Kxd6 68. Kd4 +- )
63. Bb4 Kd7 64. Bf8 Kc7 65. Bh6 Kd7 66. Bg5 +-

(c) 58... Bb2 59. Bd2
( 59. Ke3 Bc1+ )
59... Kd6 60. Be3 Kc7
( 60... Kxd5 almost draws 61. Bxb6 Kc4 62. Bxa7 Kxb5 63. Bb8 Kxa6 64. Be5 Ba3 65. Bf6!
( 65. Kg3 Be7 66. Bg7 Kb5 67. Bh6 h4+! 68. Kf3 Kc4 69. Bg5 Bxg5! 70. fxg5 Kd5 71. Kf4 Ke6 = )
65... Kb5
( 65... Bb4 66. Ke3 ( 66. Kg3 Be1+ ) 66... Kb5 67. Kd4 Kc6 68. Ke5 +- )
66. Kg3 Bd6 67. Bg5 Kc6 68. Kh4 +- )
61. Ke2 Bf6 62. Kd3 Bg7
( 62... Bd8 63. Kc4 Kd7 64. Bd4 Kd6 65. Be5+ Kd7 66. d6! 
( 66. Kd4 Bh4 67. Bb8 Bf6+ 68. Kc4 Be7 )
66... Ke6 67. d7! Kxd7 68. Kd5 Be7 69. Bd4 Bd6
(69... Bd8 70. Ke5 )
70. Bxb6 Bxf4 71. Bxa7 +- )
63. Kc4 Bf8
( 63... Bf6 64. d6+ Kxd6 65. Bxb6 )
64. d6+!
(64. Bd4 Bd6 65. Be5 Kd7 66. Bxd6 Kxd6 67. Kd4 h4 = ) 
64... Bxd6
( 64... Kxd6 65. Bxb6 )
65. Kd5 Kd7 66. Bxb6 Bxf4 67. Bxa7 +-
  

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Re: B v B Spassky - R.Byrne, m(6) 1974
Reply #1 - 07/04/17 at 20:44:34
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Byrne's book on that WC cycle (a $2.50 paperback in those days) just gave 50...bc as losing after 51. Be1 Bd8 52. Bc3 Kd7 53. Bg7 followed by 54. Bh6 and 55. Bg5.

He had a longer note after 42...Kc7:

"When the game was adjourned at this point, I was confident that I would be able to hold the draw and was still congratulating myself for the idea of blocking the position by 39...ef 40. gf.  I was looking forward to 43. Bc3 Bh4 44. Ke2 Bg3 45. Kf3 Bh4 46. Bg7 Be1 47. Bf8 Ba5 48. Bg7 Kd7 49. Bd4 Kc7 50. Bf2 Bc3 51. Kg3 Bf6 when White is getting nowhere. 

"However, just under an hour before play resumed, Lubomir Kavalek called out over the noise of my electric shaver, "Bob, you lose!" and proceeded to show that 52. Be1 Kc8 53. Bb4 Kc7 54. Ba3! puts me in zugzwang.  I cannot play 54...Bg7 because of 55. Kh4, nor can I retreat 54...Be7 because of 55. Bb2 with 56. Bg7, 57. Bh6 and 58. Bg5 to follow.  Finally, I cannot get away with 54...Kd7, since 55. c5! dc 56. Bxc5! scores the winning breakthrough.

"Although I did not know it at the time, Spassky's second, Igor Bondarevsky, had discovered the same winning method some ten minutes before Kavalek and that sealed my fate in the match.

"But after all that analysis, did the four of us, Spassky, Bondarevsky, Kavalek, and I, really go far enough?  Let's take the last line again:  54...Kd7 55. c5! dc 56. Bxc5! and continue with 56...Kc7 57. Bf8 Kd7 58. Bh6 Kd6 59. Bg5 Bd4 60. Kh4 Kxd5 61. Kxh5 Kc5 62. Kg6 Kxb5 63. h4 Kxa6 64. h5 b5 65. h6 b4 66. h7 b3 67. Bf6 Bxf6 68. Kxf6 b2 when the outcome will be a draw."
  
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B v B Spassky - R.Byrne, m(6) 1974
07/04/17 at 19:17:41
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This is from Leonard Barden, How to Play the Endgame in Chess (1975), diagram 122, page 75.

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1. f4! exf4
Quote:
Giving up a pawn to try and keep the position blocked. If 1... Bf6 white has the typical break-through 2. fxe5 dxe5 3. c5! bxc5 4. b6! and wins. 1... Kd7 might be tried, although 2. c5 still looks strong.

2. gxf4 Kd7 3. Bxd4 Kc7 4. Bc3 Kd7 5. Bb4 Kc7 6. Ke3
... 22. Kd5 Resigns


I think after 1.f4 Bf6 2.fxe5 Bxe5! black can draw: 3. Bxd4 Bxd4! 4. Kxd4 Kd8 5. Ke3 Ke7 6. Kf3 Kf7 with the opposition. It's not every day you can improve on GM adjournment analysis, so I looked into it ... and found that the diagram position never happened in the game. I sourced it from the 1974 yearbook, but also ChessBase and chessgames.com agree with my source. Here is the actual game position:

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39. f4 exf4 40. gxf4 Ke8 41. Kxd4 Kd7 42. Kd3 Kc7 43. Ke3
reaching the same position as after Barden's 6.Ke3. In the actual game 39...Bf6 is clearly impossible, 39...Kd7 even more so.

On chessgames.com, GIAaron asked on 2015.05.26:
Quote:
I could be wrong, but maybe 50...bc draws. I can't get White to win
any of the lines which result from an eventual b6, followed by
trading the h4 pawn for the f4 pawn. I could be missing something,
of course. (p/) Does anyone know any way White can force a win
there?


Below is my attempt to show a win for white after 50...bxc5 (or 12...bxc5 from the above diagram). Position 1 is just a typical situation after b5-b6 and the exchange of pawns. Positions A,B,C are the same except for the location of the black king on a8,b8,c8 respectively.

1. f4 exf4 2. gxf4 Ke8 3. Kxd4 Kd7 4. Kd3 Kc7 5. Ke3 Bf6 6. Kf3 h4
7. Ke3 Bg7 8. Kd3 Bf6 9. Bd2 Kd7 10. Be3 Kc7 11. Bf2 Kc8 12. c5

12... bxc5!?
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13. Be1 Kb8
(13... Kc7 14. Ba5+ Kc8 15. Kc4 (or 15. b6) 15... Kb8 16. b6 axb6 17. Bxb6 see "position 1" in bold 17th move)
14. Kc4
(14. Ba5 is also good. 14... Kc8
(14... Bb2!? Black should probably try this. At least there is a chance for white to go wrong. 15. Bd8 (15. Kd2?! Bf6 16. Kd3 (16. b6? axb6 17. Bxb6 c4 =) 16... Bb2 17. Bd8) 15... Bc1 16. Bxh4 Bxf4 17. Bf6 Be5 18. Bxe5 dxe5 19. d6 +-)
15. b6
(or 15. Kc4 transposing back to 14.Kc4)
15... axb6 16. Bxb6 Kb8
(16... Bb2 17. a7 Kb7 18. Bc7 Kxa7 19. Bxd6 Ba3 20. Kc4 Kb6 21. Be7) (16... Bg7 17. Bd8 Bh6 18. Bg5) (16... Be7 17. Kc4 Bf6)
17. Kc4 see "position 1" in bold 17th move)
14... Kc8
(14... Ka8 15. Ba5 Bb2?! 16. Bc7 +- there will not be stalemate 16... Bf6 17. Bxd6 Be5 18. fxe5 (or 18. Bxc5))
15. Ba5 Kb8
(15... Bb2 is very similar to 14.Ba5 Bb2: 16. Bd8 Bc1 17. Bxh4 Bxf4 18. Bf6 Bg3
(18... Be3 19. h4 f4 20. Bg5) (18... Be5 19. Bxe5 dxe5 20. d6 f4 21. b6 f3 22. b7+ Kb8 23. d7) (18... Kc7 19. h4 Kb6 20. Bd8 mate)
19. h4 f4 20. h5 f3 21. Kd3 c4+ 22. Ke3 Be5
(22... Bf4+ 23. Kxf3)
23. Bxe5 dxe5 24. h6 +- (or 24. Kxf3 +-))
16. b6 axb6
17. Bxb6
"position 1"
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17... Ka8
(17... Bb2 18. a7+ Kb7 19. Bc7)
(17... Bg7 18. Bd8 Bh6 19. Bg5)
(17... Be7 18. Kb5 Bf6 19. Ba5)
(17... Kc8 18. Kb5 Kb8 19. Ba5 Kc8?!
"position C", the worst of the three for black...
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(19... Ka8 see "position A" in the bold 19th move 20. Kc6) (19... Bb2 20. a7+ Kxa7 21. Bc7) (19... Ka7 20. Bc7 Be7 21. Bb6+ Kb8 22. Ba5 Bf6 is "position B" in the note to bold 22nd move 23. Kc6)
20. Kc6 Kb8 white is a tempo up on "position B" 21. Kxd6 c4 22. Ke6 +-)
18. Bc7
(18. Kb5 is also good.)
18... Be7 19. Ba5
(Or 19. Kb5. I make these bishop moves instead to show that white does not need to make "only" moves in order to win.)
19... Bf6
(19... Ka7 20. Kb5 Bf6 simply transposes.
(20... c4? 21. Bb6+ Ka8 22. Kxc4))
20. Kb5
(20. Bb6 Kb8 21. Kb5 Ka8
(21... Kc8 22. Kc6 Kb8 23. Kxd6 c4 24. Ke6)
22. Bc7 Be7 23. Ba5 Bf6 see "position A" in the bold 23rd move 24. Kc6)
20... Ka7
(20... Kb8 see "position B" in the note to bold 22nd move 21. Kc6)
21. Bc7 Be7 22. Bb6+ Ka8
(22... Kb8 23. Ba5 Bf6
"position B"
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24. Kc6 c4 25. Kxd6 c3 26. Ke6 c2
27. Bd2 Bb2 28. d6 c1=Q 29. Bxc1 Bxc1 30. d7 Kc7 31. Ke7 +-)
23. Ba5 Bf6
"position A"
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24. Kc6 c4
25. Kxd6 c3
26. Ke6
(26. Kc7? c2 27. Bd2 Bb2 28. d6 c1=Q+ 29. Bxc1 Bxc1 30. d7 Bxf4+ -+)
26... c2
27. Bd2 Bb2
28. d6 c1=Q
29. Bxc1 Bxc1
30. d7 +-
  

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