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Normal Topic Tactics training (Read 1172 times)
Stigma
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Re: Tactics training
Reply #3 - 12/27/18 at 19:14:24
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The answer is both of course, but that's not too helpful.

If I have to choose one over the other, I'm a big fan of 1) solving lots of easy puzzles. The thing about the easy tactics is they also tend to arise more frequently. Even though it can feel "too easy" to be serious training, being able to spot easy tactics reliably has a big effect on playing strength, both directly when opportunities arise on the board but also when they pop up within variations you calculate. So dfan is right that your abilty to solve more complicated positions logically depends on how many easy tactics you have down cold.

I try to find time for lots of easy tactics as a warm-up for tournaments, and I often score better when I'm able to do that.

The counter-argument could be that I have plateaued at around 2200 and I could have been stronger if I had solved more difficult problems... Not unlikely, but impossible to say for sure.

Ultimately I think easy tactics is more important for maintaining or regaining immediate form and as a foundation, while working on more complicated calculation may be key to more long-lasting improvement (unless you're already great at calculation and/or overusing it).
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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LeeRoth
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Re: Tactics training
Reply #2 - 12/27/18 at 16:32:25
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I'm a big fan of 2) fewer, but harder puzzles that take a lot of effort.  If I am preparing for a tournament and want to sharpen my thinking, I find it much more useful to solve 20 hard positions, than to solve 200 easy ones. For me, at least, it all comes down to intensity.  Unless you push yourself to think hard, I just don't think you get the maximum benefit.   
   

  
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dfan
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Re: Tactics training
Reply #1 - 12/27/18 at 11:24:41
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Yes, both.

The deep and accurate calculations that are sometimes required in actual games are composed of lots of trivial calculations that you have to be able to spot and perform quickly without even looking at the the position they occur in (because they're in variations). So being able to do easy calculations fast is a prerequisite for more difficult ones. (Over time one's definition of easy changes, of course.)
  
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snakebite
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Tactics training
12/27/18 at 10:00:05
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What do people think is the best method of tactical training?
1) doing lots of puzzles which are easy enough to score highly, but aiming to solve them rapidly?
2) less puzzles, but solving more complicated ones, taking longer but requiring more effort?
I think a combination of the two but think more of the complicated ones is best.
  
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