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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) McCutcheon (Read 3125 times)
LeeRoth
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #11 - 04/10/20 at 18:25:04
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@Kapovski —

Welcome to the forum!  Thanks much for taking the time to post your analysis and for being willing to share it. 

I checked some of your lines. They mostly still hold up.  The current trend seems to be for 8..f5 rather than 8..c5, mainly due to Volkov’s advocacy.  Both Ntrilis in Playing the French and Moskalenko in Flexible French (1st Ed) recommend 8...f5.

After 8..f5 9.f3 (“White’s best try”) Nxc3 10.Nxc3 c5 11.a3 Bxc3 12.bxc3 Nc6 13.Bf2 Qa5 14.Qd2 (Tamburro-Crook, corr 2010), Ntrilis proposes closing the center with 14..c4 (TN).

Moskalenko follows one of the Deutsch-Volkov games with 9.exf6 and doesn’t consider 9.f3.  He also suggests an alternative, 8..Nd7, as played in a Karjakin-Volkov rapid game.  I don’t have Moskalenko’s updated book, The Even More Flexible French, so don’t know his current recommendation.

Anyway, thanks again for the analysis.
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #10 - 04/09/20 at 02:49:25
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The name invariably confuses me. Is it MacCutcheon or McCutcheon? I have to search every time. Having done that, there is no "hook" to remember that it's McCutcheon and not MacCutcheon. Next time, I will have to search for the answer again. Sad

kapovski seems not to have used Lutes (1991) French Defense McCutcheon Variation.

I am interested in 8...f6, which is not in Lutes and not in kapovski. Maybe 9.h4 is the answer.
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #9 - 04/09/20 at 02:07:19
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Step 1.
  

MacCutcheon2.pgn ( 10 KB | 43 Downloads )
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #8 - 04/08/20 at 07:04:37
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A new member - welcome kapovski!

To help people, and to help people interact with you and each better, it might help to:
1. Post as a pgn. This saves space on the site here (avoids lots of scrolling!).
2. Add written comments here and there to explain what is happening in all these moves. Streams of moves alone are difficult, and may not be easy on readers.
3. Refer directly to other texts and/or games. This helps others see where you (and your software) overlap or perhaps improve on existing sources.

All the best,

B
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #7 - 04/07/20 at 19:02:36
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I've analyzed the McCutcheon with 6.Bh4  for white back in the day. Netted me quite a few wins too. The lines aren't checked with the latest engines, but some ideas are bound to be present still.

Never really understood why white would have to part with the bishop pair so easily; the black squared bishop can often be rerouted from g3 to f6 via h4, often after h4-h5 first, or to d4 after f2-f3, Bg3-f2-d4.

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Bb4 5.e5 h6 6.Bh4 g5 7.Bg3 Ne4

[7...Bxc3+ 8.bxc3 Ne4 9.Bd3 Nxc3 10.Qd2 Ne4
(10...Na4 11.h4 g4 12.f3 gxf3 (12...Rg8 13.fxg4 Rxg4 14.Ne2 Qe7 15.0–0) 13.Nxf3 Nb2± 14.Be2 Nc4 15.Qf4 Nc6 16.0–0 Ne7 17.Nh2 Nf5 18.Ng4)
11.Bxe4 dxe4 12.Ne2 b6
a) 12...Nc6 13.Rd1 (13.c3? Na5=+) 13...Qd5 14.Nc3 Qc4 15.Nxe4 Nb4 16.Nf6+ Ke7 17.c3 Nd5 18.h4±;
b) 12...Bd7 13.h4 g4 14.Nf4±;
13.h4 g4 14.Nc3 Bb7 15.0–0 Qd7 16.Rfe1 Nc6 17.Nxe4 0–0–0 (17...Qxd4 18.Nf6+ Ke7 19.Qe2 Qa4 20.h5 Rad8 21.Bh4 Kf8 22.Rad1±) 18.c3 Na5 19.h5 Nc4 20.Qf4+=]

8.Nge2 c5

[8...f5 9.f3 Nxg3 (9...Nxc3 10.Nxc3 c5 11.a3 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 Qa5 13.Qd2 Nc6 14.Bf2+=) 10.hxg3 Bd7
a) 10...Nc6 11.a3 Ba5 (11...Bf8 12.g4 fxg4 13.fxg4 Qe7 14.Ng3+=) 12.Qd2 Bd7 13.Nc1+=;
b) 10...c5 11.a3 cxd4 (11...Bxc3+ 12.Nxc3±) 12.axb4 dxc3 13.Nxc3+= Qb6 14.Nb5;
11.Qd2 (11.a3!? Bxc3+ 12.Nxc3+=) 11...c5 12.a3 Qa5 13.Rb1 Bxc3 14.bxc3 Nc6

a) 14...Qc7 15.f4 g4 16.c4±;
b) 14...Bc6 15.dxc5 Nd7 16.Nd4 Nxc5 17.Bb5+=;
c) 14...b6 15.f4 g4 16.c4 Qxd2+ (16...Qxa3 17.cxd5 exd5 18.dxc5 Qxc5 (18...bxc5 19.Qxd5+-) 19.Rb3 Nc6 20.Rc3 Qa5 21.e6+-) 17.Kxd2 dxc4 18.dxc5 bxc5 19.Nc3+=;
d) 14...Qxa3 15.Rxb7 Nc6 16.Qxg5 hxg5 17.Rxh8+ Ke7 18.Rh7+! Kf8 19.Rbxd7 Kg8 20.Rdg7+± Kf8 21.Rxg5 Re8 22.Rc7 Qa4 23.Rh5 Ne7 24.Rh8+ Kf7 25.Rh7+ Kf8 26.Rh6 Ng8 27.Rh8 Qxc2 (27...cxd4 28.Nxd4+-) 28.dxc5+-;

15.Rxb7 0–0–0 16.Rb1 Qxa3 17.dxc5 Nxe5 18.Nd4 Nc4 19.Bxc4 dxc4 20.c6 Bxc6 21.Qe3 Bd5 22.Nb5 Qe7 23.Ra1 Rd7 24.Ra6±;

8...Nc6 9.Qd3 (9.a3!?) 9...f5 (9...h5 10.h4+=) 10.h4 f4 (10...Nxg3 11.Qxg3±) 11.Bh2 Bd7 (11...Nxc3 12.Nxc3±) 12.a3 Ba5 13.b4+=;

8...Bd7 9.Qd3 (9.a3!?) 9...f5 10.0–0–0 Nxc3
a) 10...Nc6 11.f3 Nxg3 12.hxg3 Qe7 13.a3 Ba5 14.Kb1 0–0–0 15.Nc1 Bb6 16.Nb3 Na5;
b) 10...f4 11.Nxe4 dxe4 12.Qxe4 fxg3 13.Nxg3 Nc6 14.Nh5+- Qe7 15.Nf6+ Kf8 (15...Kd8 16.d5±)
16.h4 g4 17.c3 Ba5 18.Qxg4+-;
11.Nxc3 f4 12.h3 Bxc3 13.bxc3 Qe7 (13...fxg3 14.Qg6+ Kf8 15.Rd3+-) 14.Bh2=;

8...h5 9.h4+= Nxg3 (9...c5 unclear10.a3 Nxg3 11.Nxg3 Bxc3+ 12.bxc3 g4) 10.Nxg3 g4]

9.a3 Bxc3+

[9...Ba5 10.dxc5 Bxc3+ 11.Nxc3 Nxc3 12.bxc3 Qa5 13.Qd2 Nd7 (13...Nc6 14.h4±) 14.f3 (14.h4± Nxc5 15.hxg5 Ne4 16.Qd4± Nxg3 17.fxg3 h5 18.Rb1±) 14...Nxc5 15.c4 (15.h4 g4 16.c4 Qxd2+ 17.Kxd2 gxf3 18.gxf3 dxc4 19.Bxc4+=) 15...Qxd2+ 16.Kxd2+=]

10.Nxc3 Nxc3

[10...Qa5 11.dxc5 Nxc3 (11...Qxc5 12.Nxe4 dxe4 13.Qe2±; 11...Nxg3 12.hxg3 Qxc5 13.Nb5± Bd7 14.Nd6+ Ke7 15.Qf3 f5 16.Qh5+-) 12.Qd2+= Nd7
a) 12...Qxc5 13.bxc3 (13.Qxc3!? Qxc3+ 14.bxc3 b6 15.h4 g4 16.c4+= Ba6 (16...dxc4 17.h5 (17.Bxc4 Bb7 18.0–0 Ba6 19.Bd3 Bxd3 20.cxd3 Nc6=) 17...Bb7 (17...Ba6 18.Rh4 Rg8 19.Bf4±) 18.Rh4 Rg8 19.Bf4 Nc6 20.0–0–0 Ne7 21.Be2 Rc8 (21...Bxg2 22.Rxg4 Bd5 23.Rxg8+ Nxg8 24.Rg1 Kd7 (24...Kf8 25.a4 a6 26.Kb2 b5 27.Kc3 bxa4 28.Ra1 Kg7 29.Rxa4 Ne7 unclear) 25.Kb2 a6 26.Rg7 Ke7 27.Kc3 b5 28.Kb4+=) 22.Rxg4+=) 17.cxd5 Bxf1 18.Rxf1 exd5 19.0–0–0±) 13...Nc6 14.Bd3 ;
b) 12...d4!? 13.bxc3 (13.h4 Rg8 (13...g4 14.bxc3 dxc3 15.Qf4 h5± 16.Rd1) 14.hxg5 Nc6 (14...hxg5 15.bxc3 dxc3 16.Qd6 Nd7 17.Rd1 Qxc5 18.Qd3 Qxa3 19.Be2 a5 20.Rh7 Rf8 21.Bh5 Qc5 22.Rxf7 Rxf7 23.Qg6 Qf8 24.Qxg5 a4? 25.Rd6 Ra6 26.Bh4 Nf6 27.Qxf6+-) 15.bxc3 (15.gxh6!? Nd5 16.Qxa5 Nxa5 17.h7 Rh8 18.0–0–0 Nc6 19.Bd3 Kf8 20.Be4 Kg7 21.Rh5 Nce7 22.Rdh1 a5 23.Bxd5 Nxd5 24.Rg5+ Kf8 25.Rg4 a4 26.Kd2 Ra5 27.Rg8+ Rxg8 28.h8Q Rxh8 29.Rxh8+ Ke7 30.Rxc8–+) 15...dxc3 16.Qd6±)
13...dxc3 (13...Qxc3 14.Qxc3 dxc3 15.h4 Rg8 16.hxg5 hxg5 17.f3 Nd7 18.Bf2 Nxe5 19.Bd4 Nd7 20.Bb5+= a6 21.Ba4 Ke7±) 14.Qe3 (14.Qd6 Nd7 15.h4 g4 16.h5 Qxc5 17.Rd1) 14...Nd7 15.h4 Rg8 16.Qe4!?
(16.c6 bxc6 17.Rd1 Bb7 18.Be2 Qxa3 19.0–0 Qc5 (19...0–0–0 20.Bh5 Rdf8 21.hxg5 hxg5 22.Bf3 Qb4 23.Rd6 Nb6 24.Bxc6 Bxc6 25.Rxc6+ Kb8 26.Rxc3+=) 20.Qf3 Qe7 21.hxg5 hxg5 22.Rd6 Nb6
23.Qxc3 Kf8 24.Rfd1 (24.Qc5!? Kg7 25.f4±) 24...Rh8 (24...Kg7? 25.R1d4 Rab8 26.Rg4 Kh6 27.Bf4+-) )
16...Nxc5 17.Qh7 Rf8 18.hxg5 hxg5 19.Qg7 Qd8 (19...Ne4 20.Rh8 Rxh8 21.Qxh8+ Ke7 22.Rd1 a6 23.Bd3 Nd2 24.Qf6+±; 19...a6 20.f3 against Ne4; 19...Bd7 20.Rh8+-) 20.Rd1 Bd7 21.Rh8 Qe7 22.Rxf8+ Qxf8 23.Qxg5 Ne4 24.Qg4 Nxg3 25.Qxg3 Rc8 26.Rd6 Rc6 27.Rd3 Rc8 28.Rxc3 Rxc3 29.Qxc3 Qh6 30.Qe3± Qh8 31.Kd2 Qh1 32.Be2 Qxg2 33.Bf3 Qf1 34.Qxa7±;
13.b4 Ne4 14.bxa5 Nxd2 15.Kxd2 Nxc5 16.f3 Bd7 17.Bf2 Rc8 18.Bd4 Ke7 19.Rb1 Rc7 20.Be2 Rhc8 21.g4 Na4 22.Bd3± Nc5 23.h4 Nxd3 24.cxd3 Rc2+ 25.Ke3 Bc6 26.hxg5 hxg5 27.Rh5+- a6 28.Rxg5±;

10...cxd4 11.Qxd4 Nc6 12.Bb5+= Bd7 13.Bxc6 Bxc6 14.0–0–0 Qb6 (14...Nxg3 15.hxg3+=; 14...Qa5 15.Nxe4 dxe4 16.h4+=) 15.Nxe4 dxe4 16.Qc3± e3 17.f3;

10...h5 11.Nxe4 dxe4 12.h4 cxd4 (12...gxh4 13.Rxh4 Qxd4 14.Qxd4 cxd4 15.Rxe4; 12...g4 13.dxc5) 13.hxg5 Nc6 14.Rxh5 Rxh5 15.Qxh5 Qa5+ 16.c3 dxc3 17.0–0–0 cxb2+ 18.Kxb2 Qb6+ 19.Ka2± Qc5
20.Rd2 Qc1 21.Bf4 Qxf1 22.g6+- Qc4+ 23.Kb2 Qb5+ 24.Ka1 Qf1+ 25.Rd1 Qxd1+ 26.Qxd1 fxg6 27.Qh1±]

11.bxc3 Qa5 12.Qd2 Nc6

[12...cxd4 13.cxd4 Qxd2+ 14.Kxd2 Nc6 15.h4 g4 (15...Nxd4 16.hxg5 h5 17.f4+-; 15...Rg8 16.hxg5 hxg5 17.c3+=) 16.Bb5 (16.Ke3!? Na5 17.h5 Bd7? 18.Rh4 Rg8 19.Bf4±; 16.c3!?) 16...Bd7 17.Bxc6 Bxc6 18.h5 0–0–0+= 19.Rh4 Rdg8 20.Bf4 a5 21.Re1 Kd7 22.Re3±]

13.dxc5

[13.h4= Rg8 14.hxg5 hxg5=]

13...Qxc5

[13...Bd7 Watson 14.Bd3 (14.Be2?!= Watson 14...Qxc5 15.f4 gxf4 16.Bxf4 0–0–0 17.Be3 Qa5 18.Bd4 Rdg8=) 14...Qxc5 transposes]

14.h4

[14.Bd3 Bd7 15.0–0 Na5
(15...Rc8 16.Rab1 b6
(16...Na5 17.Qe2 Qxa3
a) 17...b6 18.Kh1+= (18.Qf3!?) ;
b) 17...Qxc3 18.f4±; 18.f4)
17.Kh1 Na5 18.f4+= Qxc3 19.Qf2)
16.Rab1 b6 (16...Qxa3 17.f4+=) 17.h4+= Rg8
a) 17...Rc8 18.hxg5 Qxc3 19.Qf4 hxg5 20.Qf6 Rg8 21.Bh7 Rf8 22.Qxg5 Qxa3 23.Bh4 Rh8 24.Qh5 Rxc2 25.Bf6 Qf8 26.Rfc1 Rxc1+ 27.Rxc1 Qg8 (27...Nc4 28.Rxc4 dxc4 29.Qf3±) 28.Bxh8 Qxh8 29.Rc7 unclear(29.Rc3!?) 29...Nc6 30.f4 b5 (30...Kd8 31.Rxd7+ Kxd7 32.Qxf7+ Ne7 33.Bd3) 31.Rb7;
b) 17...Nc4 18.Bxc4 dxc4 19.hxg5 hxg5 20.Qxg5±;
c) 17...0–0–0 18.Rb4;
d) 17...Qxa3 18.hxg5 hxg5 19.Qxg5 Qxc3 20.Qf6 Rg8 21.Bh7 Rf8 22.Bf4 Qc5 23.Bh6 Qe7 24.Qg7±;
e) 17...g4 18.h5±; 18.hxg5 hxg5 19.Rb4 Rc8 20.Rg4 Qxc3 21.Rxg5 Rxg5 (21...Qxd2 22.Rxg8+ Ke7 23.Bh4+ f6 24.Bxf6+ Kf7 25.Rg7+ Kf8 26.Rxd7+- Nc6 (26...Nc4 27.Rh7 Nxe5 28.Bxe5+-) 27.Rh7 Nxe5) 22.Qxg5 Qxa3 23.Bh4+= Nc6 24.Rd1 Planning c4]

14...g4

[14...Rg8 15.c4 Bd7
(15...dxc4 16.hxg5 hxg5 17.Rd1 Qxa3 18.Be2!?+=
(18.Rh7+= Qa5 (18...Qe7 19.Bxc4 Qb4 20.Be2 Qxd2+ 21.Kxd2 Bd7 22.Kc1 with compensation Ke7 23.f4) 19.c3 Nxe5 20.Qd4 Nc6 (20...Nd3+? 21.Bxd3 cxd3 22.Rh8) 21.Qf6+= Qf5 22.Rh8 Qxf6 23.Rxg8+ Ke7 24.Bd6+ Kd7 25.Be5+ Ke7 26.Bxf6+ Kxf6 27.Bxc4+=)
18...Qe7 (18...Qa5 19.c3 Nxe5 20.Bxe5+-) 19.0–0 Bd7 20.Qe3 Nb4 21.Bxc4+=)
16.hxg5 hxg5 17.cxd5+= Nd4 18.Bd3 Qxd5 19.0–0–0 Qa2?! 20.Qb4±]

15.Bd3+= Bd7 16.0–0 0–0–0 17.Rfb1 Kb8

[17...d4 18.cxd4 Nxd4 (18...Qxd4 19.c3 Qa4 20.h5 Be8 21.Qe3 Rg8 22.Bh4 Rd5 23.Bh7+-) 19.Qb4 Qxb4 20.axb4 a6 (20...Kb8 21.b5 Bc8 22.Rb4 b6 23.Bf4 h5 24.Kh2 Rhe8 25.Raa4 Nf5 26.Bxf5 exf5 27.e6+ Ka8 28.exf7 Rf8 29.Bc7 Rd2 30.Bxb6 Rxf7 31.Rc4+-) 21.c4 Bc6 (21...Be8 22.Ra3) 22.b5± axb5 23.cxb5 Bd5 24.Ra4+- (24.Ra8+ Kd7+=) ;

17...Na5 18.h5! Nc4 19.Qf4 Rdf8 (19...Nxa3 20.Qb4 Qxb4 21.Rxb4 Nc4 22.Bxc4 dxc4 23.Bh4 Rde8 24.Rxa7 Bc6 25.Rxc4+-) 20.Qd4
a) 20.a4 Bc6 21.Qd4 (21.a5 a6 22.Qxg4 Rfg8 23.Qd4 Qxd4 24.cxd4 Rg4 (24...Rg5 25.Bf4 Rxh5 26.Be2 Rf5 27.Bc1 Rg8 28.Kf1) 25.c3) 21...Qxd4 22.cxd4 Kb8 23.a5 a6;
b) 20.Qxg4 Rhg8 21.Qd4 Qxd4 22.cxd4 Rg5 (22...Rg4 23.c3 Rfg8 24.Be2±) 23.Rb4 (23.Bf4 Rxh5 24.Be2 Rh4 25.g4 h5 26.Bg3 Rxg4 27.Bxg4 hxg4) 23...a5 24.Rb3 Rxh5 25.Rab1 b5 (25...Bc6 26.Rc3 Nd2 27.Rb2 Rg8 28.Ba6+=) 26.Rc3 Rg8 27.Bxc4 bxc4 28.Rf3 Rg4 (28...Rg7 29.Rf6± Ba4 30.c3 Bb3 31.Bf4 Rh3 32.Bxh6 Rg8 33.f3) 29.Rxf7 Rxd4 30.Rf8+ Kc7 31.f4 Rd2 32.Be1 Rxc2 33.Bxa5+ Kc6 34.Ra8+-;

20...Qxd4 21.cxd4 Bc6 22.a4± Rhg8 (22...Rfg8 23.Bh4 Nd2 24.Re1 Ne4 25.Bxe4 dxe4 26.Bf6 Rh7 27.Re3 g3 28.Rxg3+-) 23.Bf4 Rh8 24.a5 a6 25.Be2 Rfg8 26.Rb3 Kc7 27.Rg3 Bb5 28.Bxg4+- b6 29.axb6+ Kxb6 30.Bf3 Rxg3 31.fxg3 a5 32.g4 a4 33.g5 hxg5 34.Bxg5 a3 35.Ra2 Ba4 36.Bf6 Rh7 37.Be7+-;

17...a6 18.Rb2 Na5 (18...h5 19.Rab1±) 19.Rb4 Nc4 20.Bxc4 (20.Qf4 a5 21.Rb3 Ba4 22.Rbb1+=) 20...dxc4 21.Qf4+= (21.Qd6± Qxd6 (21...Qd5 22.Rd1 Qe4 23.f3 gxf3 24.Rd4 Bc6 25.Rxe4 Rxd6 26.exd6 Bxe4 27.Rxc4+ Bc6 28.gxf3+=) 22.exd6 b5 23.Be5 Rhg8 24.a4+=) 21...Bc6 22.Kh2 Qd5 23.Rg1+= Qd2 24.Rxc4]

18.Rb5 Qf8

[18...Qe7 19.a4+= Ka8 20.Rab1 Bc8 21.a5]

19.Rab1 Bc8

[19...b6 20.Qe3 Ka8 21.c4 dxc4 22.Be4 Rb8 (22...Qe7 23.Rxb6 axb6 24.Qxb6+-) 23.a4 Qe7 24.Qc3 Rhc8 25.a5 bxa5 26.Qxa5+- Rxb5 27.Qxb5 Be8 28.Bf4 Qc7 29.Qxc4+- Rb8 30.Rd1 h5 31.Be3 Rb7 32.Qa6 Qc8 33.Qa4 Qc7 34.Rd6+-]

20.a4 Ka8

[20...f5 21.exf6+ Ka8 22.c4! (22.Qe3 Qxf6 23.c4±) 22...dxc4 23.Qc3 Rd4 24.Be5 Rd5 25.Bxc4 Rxe5 26.Rxe5+- Nxe5 27.Qxe5]

21.a5 Rd7

[21...a6 22.Rb6 Qc5 23.Bf4 Nb8 (23...Nxa5 24.Bxa6; 23...Qxa5 24.Bxa6; 23...h5 24.Be3 Qxa5 25.Bxa6) 24.Be2 (24.Be3 Qxa5 25.Be2 Rd7) 24...Qxa5 25.Bxg4±]

22.Qf4

[22.a6 b6 23.R5b2+=]

22...a6 23.Rb6 Qc5 24.Qxg4 Qxa5

(24… Nxa5  25.Qg7 Rdd8 26.Bxa6 bxa6 27.Qxf7 Rd7 28.Qxe8+-)

25.Qg7 Re8 26.Qxh6+- Qxc3 27.h5 Nd4

[27...Nxe5 28.Qf6]

28.Qf6 Nxc2? 29.R6b3 Qc6 30.Rc1+-



  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #6 - 02/15/20 at 16:27:07
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RdC wrote on 01/30/19 at 00:59:58:
Krudos wrote on 01/29/19 at 21:56:30:
I am thinking about playing the McCutcheon but it does not seem to be popular at elite level: can someone advise what the critical lines are now please?


Probably much the same as they always were, except that in the sequence 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4 5. e5 h6, it's possible to play both 6. Be3 and 6. Bc1 instead of 6. Bd2. So there are different positions to be aware of. It's also quite possible for White to be boring and play 5. exd5.

As you suggest, there's a shortage of games from elite players with either colour.

I suppose there should be improvements on the Fischer-Rossolimo game although engines think it's about equal.

When I actually get the McCutcheon over the board instead of the Steinitz (more common at the club level in my experience), 6 Be3 is just as common as 6 Bd2 and can't be played on autopilot as if it was 6 Bd2 . . . it requires some work. 

By the way, the problem for White in playing Bg5 in the first place is less the McCutcheon and 4 ... Be7 but more the many different setups Black has in the Burn.  It is just too much work for a Club player relative to the Steinitz, which isn't necessarily easy . . . just more manageable in my opinion (especially if you try a sideline instead of 5 f4).
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #5 - 02/15/20 at 11:58:34
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I think if you went through some earlier games with Stockfish and LcO you could find some ideas.
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #4 - 02/14/20 at 21:31:48
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Krudos wrote on 01/29/19 at 21:56:30:
I am thinking about playing the McCutcheon but it does not seem to be popular at elite level


Byron Jacobs wrote an excellent book in 2001 - French Classical. He says that white has been unable to demonstrate any advantage since its inception (Steinitz-McCutcheon) to the present. However white has the practical advantage of having many variations from which to choose.

As a player of the white pieces, I concur. I've looked at many responses by white, and it seems that black always has an answer.
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #3 - 01/31/19 at 23:09:52
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Krudos wrote on 01/29/19 at 21:56:30:
I am thinking about playing the McCutcheon but it does not seem to be popular at elite level


As others said above, 4. Ag5 is not as popular as 4. e5. The McCutcheon is a sound reply, feistier than 4...Ae7 which is very solid. At elite level they usually do battle on the Steinitz 4. e5 Cfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Cf3 Cc6 7. Ae3 where Black has many choices. This is what you see a lot at 2700+ level, but not because McCutcheon is bad. Is because Black does not get as many chance to play against 4. Ag5 in the first place.

McCutcheon essentially is reminiscent of Winawer, and 6. Ad2 a Winawer where both sides lack dark squared bitchops  Cheesy
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #2 - 01/31/19 at 12:43:55
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Kasimdzhaov brought out a good DVD on it for Chessbase in 2017 and I think Andrew Martin also did one for some another company.

GM Sergey Volkov is probably its most faithful supporter.

To my knowledge and in my experience the McCutcheon is fully playable - but not very easy to play, for either colour. Many of the positions reached are messy, unbalanced and unique to the McCutcheon and they require a lot of concrete knowledge - by both sides.

Since after 4 Bg5 White also has to be ready to face 4...Be7 and 4...dxe4, i.e. a wide variety of position types, it is hardly surprising that many Whites avoid the whole issue and base their repertoire on 4 e5. I think this probably accounts for the fairly low number of high-level games featuring the McCutcheon in recent years.
  
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Re: McCutcheon
Reply #1 - 01/30/19 at 00:59:58
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Krudos wrote on 01/29/19 at 21:56:30:
I am thinking about playing the McCutcheon but it does not seem to be popular at elite level: can someone advise what the critical lines are now please?


Probably much the same as they always were, except that in the sequence 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Bb4 5. e5 h6, it's possible to play both 6. Be3 and 6. Bc1 instead of 6. Bd2. So there are different positions to be aware of. It's also quite possible for White to be boring and play 5. exd5.

As you suggest, there's a shortage of games from elite players with either colour.

I suppose there should be improvements on the Fischer-Rossolimo game although engines think it's about equal.
  
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McCutcheon
01/29/19 at 21:56:30
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I am thinking about playing the McCutcheon but it does not seem to be popular at elite level: can someone advise what the critical lines are now please?

Krudos
  
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