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Normal Topic Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames (Read 443 times)
an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
Reply #1 - 04/10/19 at 03:20:39
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Back in the day I found the treatment in Keres (1974) Practical Chess Endings the most comprehensible. But now there is a clear best answer. Hajenius / van Riemsdijk (1977) (1997) The Final Countdown is the book you want. And the reason is simple, they devote plenty of space to the topic, whereas other books usually give only a few pages or sometimes just a few examples. Take a look at the diagram, which they explain on three pages.

Diagram 18
N. Grigoriev, 1922
White to play and win
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
*

But there is no perfect book.

Quote:
... Therefore the conclusion is very clear: With White to move the position depicted in Diagram 18 is also won, and the only [sic] way of winning it is: by moving the white king all the way back through g2!
-- Hajenius / van Riemsdijk (1977) The Final Countdown, page 29

Not quite so. It is still possible to win if white is completely barred from the g2 square, because the e2 square also suffices for the winning maneuver. But it's just a quibble with the word "only", in all other respects their analysis is very good and very understandable.
« Last Edit: 04/10/19 at 13:35:31 by an ordinary chessplayer »  
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Leon_Trotsky
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Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
04/10/19 at 00:53:49
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Is there a resource that can clearly explain theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames ¿

I tried reading pawn book by Müller and the big tome by Авербах. The corresponding squares chapter I cannot comprehend properly no matter how slow I read them. I read same examples over three times, and still have no idea what the hell they are talking about.

Most pawn books that cover this I end up confused on how they map out by 1, 2, 3, etc. which corresponding square is which, and why. I see diagram in book and think, so what was order of numbering the squares, and why there are duplicated corresponding squares. Maybe a wideo would be helpful but obviously Авербах cannot upload on YouTube  Cheesy
  
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