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Normal Topic Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames (Read 1439 times)
Leon_Trotsky
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Re: Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
Reply #6 - 08/30/19 at 18:39:03
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I cannot post a photo of some of the book examples due to copyright (or can I ¿), but there are many examples in the corresponding squares chapter with studies from Zinar. On the board has numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. for White and for Black.

Someone wrote about corresponding squares on their website. It looks something like this:

https://www.ysifueraunapartida.com/finales-de-peones-casillas-conjugadas/#Las_ca...
  
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Stigma
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Re: Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
Reply #5 - 08/30/19 at 04:59:10
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There is also a chapter on the theory of corresponding squares in Endgame Preparation by Jonathan Speelman.

I can't say whether it's better or more or less confusing than the other accounts mentioned here, as I've never studied any of them (including Speelman's).

But I do notice that Speelman takes the concept beyond pawn endgames and includes some minor piece endgames, studies and even problems at the end of the chapter.
« Last Edit: 08/30/19 at 12:51:53 by Stigma »  

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Leon_Trotsky
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Re: Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
Reply #4 - 08/30/19 at 04:33:08
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Yes, Awerbach and Maizelis. White cover with "Pawn Endings" on upper left-hand part of cover with pictures of kings and pawns in foreground.

The chapter is called "Development of the Theory of Co-ordinate Squares".

Subsections are:

1) Normal opposition
2) Triangular system
3) Eight square system
4) 'T' system
5) Some observations and conclusions

Many diagrams have numbers on squares for the corresponding squares, sometimes with "a" and "b" for critical zugzwang squares.

But what I mean is that this material is so confusing that I bet most GMs would have trouble understanding it.

I read basically all books without the board, so that is not the problem. I try to understand how they number the squares and determine with "system" it is.

The reprint of this book, Comprehensive Chess Endings 4, has names of systems that sound like differential equations, like "quadratic", "first-order", "second-order".

Maybe all of this is not necessary to fully grasp pawn endings, much less play this in OTB games when you have 30 seconds and 5 minute increment. But still, I would like to understand this thing.
  
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an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
Reply #3 - 08/30/19 at 03:41:37
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Was your Pawn Endings book written by Averbakh alone? Can you give more bibliographic detail? The 1974 Batsford / Chess Digest edition, based on a previous Russian edition, was written by Averbakh and Maizelis. Amazon says the 1987 Pergamon edition was also by Averbakh and Maizelis.

About 40 years ago, as a 1600-player, I went through the Chess Digest book blindfold. Obviously I would have learned much more had I set up the pieces and played through the examples, like I did with BCE years after. I do remember concluding that the corresponding squares method was for adjournments only - too impractical for OTB.

They chose difficult examples, to clearly demonstrate the general applicability of the method. With practice and plenty of time it *is* possible to solve them OTB, but nobody is going to be doing it on increment-time. The value of working through hard studies is that you get some over-compensation; afterwards the more typical cases you might actually get OTB are easier to solve.

The Final Countdown book I mentioned before has a broader range of difficulty in the examples.
  
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Leon_Trotsky
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Re: Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
Reply #2 - 08/29/19 at 22:14:08
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I am reading Awerbach's last chapter of his Pawn Endings book, where he talks about corresponding squares in detail. He classifies it almost like a mathematics textbook, with "quadratic system", "T-square" and other terms.

But I am really having a hard time trying to figure out how to assign the numbers of these corresponding squares. Many examples go into sets of ten corresponding squares for White and Black. And even to do it, how possible is it to do corresponding squares analysis, remember where all the squares are and play this position in OTB games where you probably are in severe time pressure ¿
  
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Re: Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
Reply #1 - 04/10/19 at 03:20:39
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Back in the day I found the treatment in Keres (1974) Practical Chess Endings the most comprehensible. But now there is a clear best answer. Hajenius / van Riemsdijk (1977) (1997) The Final Countdown is the book you want. And the reason is simple, they devote plenty of space to the topic, whereas other books usually give only a few pages or sometimes just a few examples. Take a look at the diagram, which they explain on three pages.

Diagram 18
N. Grigoriev, 1922
White to play and win
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
*

But there is no perfect book.

Quote:
... Therefore the conclusion is very clear: With White to move the position depicted in Diagram 18 is also won, and the only [sic] way of winning it is: by moving the white king all the way back through g2!
-- Hajenius / van Riemsdijk (1977) The Final Countdown, page 29

Not quite so. It is still possible to win if white is completely barred from the g2 square, because the e2 square also suffices for the winning maneuver. But it's just a quibble with the word "only", in all other respects their analysis is very good and very understandable.
« Last Edit: 04/10/19 at 13:35:31 by an ordinary chessplayer »  
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Leon_Trotsky
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Theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames
04/10/19 at 00:53:49
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Is there a resource that can clearly explain theory of corresponding squares in pawn endgames ¿

I tried reading pawn book by Müller and the big tome by Авербах. The corresponding squares chapter I cannot comprehend properly no matter how slow I read them. I read same examples over three times, and still have no idea what the hell they are talking about.

Most pawn books that cover this I end up confused on how they map out by 1, 2, 3, etc. which corresponding square is which, and why. I see diagram in book and think, so what was order of numbering the squares, and why there are duplicated corresponding squares. Maybe a wideo would be helpful but obviously Авербах cannot upload on YouTube  Cheesy
  
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