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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki (Read 13760 times)
ErictheRed
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #57 - 07/02/19 at 17:32:22
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winawer77 wrote on 06/27/19 at 16:09:57:
ErictheRed wrote on 06/25/19 at 15:58:11:
I'm curious what he recommends against the Grunfeld, Benoni, and Benko, or how he avoids those lines.  Also the King's Indian. 


Grunfeld is met by 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 0-0 5.0-0 d5 6.c4 with typical play for this line.

King's Indian is (after the above moves) 5...d6 6.b3.

Benoni and Benko are avoided, instead he goes into commonly recommended anti-Indian systems against them, but with his own twist.

Benoni is met by 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d5 g6 4.Nc3 Bg7 5.e4 d6 and now he recommends the new 6.Bc4!? with the idea of discouraging ...e6

Benko is met by 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d5 b5 4.c3!? Instead of the usual 4.Bg5, although Bg5 usually follows at some stage.


Thank you.
  
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Stigma
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #56 - 06/28/19 at 00:33:54
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BeeCaves wrote on 06/27/19 at 20:36:08:
Stigma wrote on 06/27/19 at 17:13:49:
The weird thing with 6.Bc4 is it seems to make one of Black's other plans stronger: ...Bg4 to get rid of a minor piece, followed by ...Nbd7, ...a6 and usually ...Ne8-c7, playing for the ...b5 break but also sometimes ...f5.

I have struggled with White against that plan even in its most common version (with White playing Be2), and it looks like White will lose time compared to that with Bc4 and Qxf3 because he probably doesn't want to allow ...Ne5xc4. So I'm skeptical. But I will take a look at what Sielecki has to say about 6.Bc4.


It looks like his line is almost exactly what you would expect based on what you wrote -- White simply gets the bishop pair on f3, loses time retreating, makes normal moves like a4 and Re1 ... But Stockfish seems to give White an edge.  He doesn't consider ...f5 in combination with Bxf3 though.

Maybe ...f5 is more appropriate when Black has kept his light-squared bishop, or as a counter specifically to f2-f4 with White's rook still on f1, I'm not sure. I have tried all the decent lines for White here: 6.Bb5+, 6.Bc4, 6.Be2 (with both Nd2 and allowing ...Bxf3 after 6...Bg4) and inserting h3 to avoid ...Bg4 altogether if the move order allows it. So it's a bit hard to keep all the possibilites apart.

There's really just one guy who plays this against me all the time in blitz and rapid. But he's an IM, a blitz expert and something of an angstgegner, so it may not be just the opening that is at fault for my abysmal results...

I looked at Sielecki's lines now. They look decent enough, but they end too early to my mind. I could easily see myself finding all his moves at the board and still getting in trouble a few more moves down the line. So further analysis is needed.

I should have that NIC Yearbook somewhere. There's also a Schmid Benoni game with three test questions along the way in Dvoretsky's Strategic Play - the chapter is called 'Clash of Plans' and the game is Browne - Gheorghiu, London 1980.
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1462512

There White played with Be2, but with an unusual early Nd2 move order that avoids ...Bg4. Maybe Black could have tried ...e6 against it, but instead he played for ...b5 really slowly with ...Na6-c7, ...b6, ...Ba6, ...Rb8 and eventually ...a6. But Black still won in the end! This is a tricky opening for both sides to handle.
  

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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #55 - 06/27/19 at 23:03:49
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Is it bad to let Black take on d4, like 1. d4 Cf6 2. Cf3 c5 3. g3 and continue like reversed Tarrasch ¿ I expected something like this instead of declined Blumenfeld or Schmidt Benoni.

3. g3 is like a lazy way of playing Catalan against everything, even without c4 played. To me it keeps things much simpler.

About Grünfeld, why not b3 without c4, transposing to strange Colle-Zukertort where White has double fianchetto ¿ I thought that b3 with c4 lines against ...c6/...d5 Fianchetto Grünfeld were equal like Awrukh and Swidler proved.
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #54 - 06/27/19 at 23:02:17
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A bit of a follow-up:  apparently the article I was imperfectly remembering is one by Rustem Dautov back in 2001.  Regarding this game (unlike the other ways of playing by Black which he addressed) he didn't indicate a way for White to be better.  "Socko's plan with Bf4-g3 was too simplistic; White should look for an improvement."
http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1168497
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #53 - 06/27/19 at 20:36:08
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Stigma wrote on 06/27/19 at 17:13:49:
kylemeister wrote on 06/27/19 at 16:48:43:
Well, that 6. Bc4 in the Schmid Benoni isn't exactly new.  There was a Yearbook article on it some years ago which regarded it as a good try for an edge.


The weird thing with 6.Bc4 is it seems to make one of Black's other plans stronger: ...Bg4 to get rid of a minor piece, followed by ...Nbd7, ...a6 and usually ...Ne8-c7, playing for the ...b5 break but also sometimes ...f5.

I have struggled with White against that plan even in its most common version (with White playing Be2), and it looks like White will lose time compared to that with Bc4 and Qxf3 because he probably doesn't want to allow ...Ne5xc4. So I'm skeptical. But I will take a look at what Sielecki has to say about 6.Bc4.


It looks like his line is almost exactly what you would expect based on what you wrote -- White simply gets the bishop pair on f3, loses time retreating, makes normal moves like a4 and Re1 ... But Stockfish seems to give White an edge.  He doesn't consider ...f5 in combination with Bxf3 though.

I know what you mean about this line though -- I have never studied it that rigorously or faced it in a slow game but seem to get it in Blitz every couple months, and always feel like I screw it up.

Often playing on auto-pilot, I'll do something like
1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 c5 3 d5 g6 4 Nc3 Bg7 5 e4 d6 6 Be2 Bg4 7 Nd2 Bxe2 8 Qxe2 0-0 9 0-0 a6 10 a4 Nbd7 11 a5 Re8 12 Nc4 b5 13 axb6 Nxb6 14 Nxb6 Qxb6

Comp still likes White here and is probably right and I played plans that frequently get recommended in books in Benoni structures (playing Nd2 to avoid ... Bxf3 and get to c4, playing a4-a5 if Black doesn't play b6, etc).

But feels like I'm playing Benko gambit without the extra pawn.

Sometimes instead I've tried Nc4-a5, and trying to go to c6, instead of trading on b6.  And during the blitz game I felt like I'm Karpov trying to exploit a weak square (and sometimes the move is good if the tempos work out) but you can also just get the Nc6 in a world of trouble if e7-e6 works for Black and the Nb6 and Nf6 are hitting d5.

Sometime I use the extra tempos to develop the Bc1 but then b2 can be weak, or sometimes I've tried to push e4-e5 quickly but you really need to get the moment right.

So perhaps there's no big rush to move quickly as White, and trading the Bg4 on e2 instead of f3 seems to be nothing special, the Nd2-c4 plan might be more effective in Benoni than Schmidt Benoni.





  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #52 - 06/27/19 at 17:13:49
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kylemeister wrote on 06/27/19 at 16:48:43:
Well, that 6. Bc4 in the Schmid Benoni isn't exactly new.  There was a Yearbook article on it some years ago which regarded it as a good try for an edge.


The weird thing with 6.Bc4 is it seems to make one of Black's other plans stronger: ...Bg4 to get rid of a minor piece, followed by ...Nbd7, ...a6 and usually ...Ne8-c7, playing for the ...b5 break but also sometimes ...f5.

I have struggled with White against that plan even in its most common version (with White playing Be2), and it looks like White will lose time compared to that with Bc4 and Qxf3 because he probably doesn't want to allow ...Ne5xc4. So I'm skeptical. But I will take a look at what Sielecki has to say about 6.Bc4.
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #51 - 06/27/19 at 16:48:43
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Well, that 6. Bc4 in the Schmid Benoni isn't exactly new.  There was a Yearbook article on it some years ago which regarded it as a good try for an edge.
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #50 - 06/27/19 at 16:09:57
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ErictheRed wrote on 06/25/19 at 15:58:11:
I'm curious what he recommends against the Grunfeld, Benoni, and Benko, or how he avoids those lines.  Also the King's Indian. 


Grunfeld is met by 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 0-0 5.0-0 d5 6.c4 with typical play for this line.

King's Indian is (after the above moves) 5...d6 6.b3.

Benoni and Benko are avoided, instead he goes into commonly recommended anti-Indian systems against them, but with his own twist.

Benoni is met by 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d5 g6 4.Nc3 Bg7 5.e4 d6 and now he recommends the new 6.Bc4!? with the idea of discouraging ...e6

Benko is met by 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.d5 b5 4.c3!? Instead of the usual 4.Bg5, although Bg5 usually follows at some stage.
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #49 - 06/25/19 at 15:58:11
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I'm curious what he recommends against the Grunfeld, Benoni, and Benko, or how he avoids those lines.  Also the King's Indian.
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #48 - 06/21/19 at 09:32:33
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Thanks everyone for advising me on how Chessable works. So I took the plunge and bought it! For an existing 1.d4 2.Nf3 player this repertoire is potentially of great value to me. Sure, I would prefer a paper book to the MoveTrainer, but as I couldn’t wait for it to be printed (November, I think) I decided to try out Chessable. I don’t regret my purchase.

If anyone wants to know what he recommends against any particular variation then please ask away. I won’t give any analysis away but will share the main repertoire choice.

As far as ‘Keep it Simple’ goes, this book is very different from the 1.e4 book. That one gave clear pawn structures and plans against each black response. 1.d4 is quite the opposite - though our initial moves are the same 1.d4, 2.Nf3 3.g3 etc there are transpositions into other openings everywhere. Clear plans are often sidelined in cases where Black sharpens the play at the outset, resulting in often obscure and non-typical pawn structures that are uncommon (in my experience) for a traditional 1.d4 player. It’s very much an ‘Avrukh-lite’ repertoire; there’s a huge amount of material to work through.

If you are attached to your d-pawn and like a typical presence in the centre with the pawn occupying d4 or d5 you will find a lot of the recommendations go against the grain. The pawn will often be exchanged off by a ...c5 from Black, often with your pawns still on c2 and e2, so don’t think it’s just an English. Sometimes with dxc5 from White, sometimes allowing ...cxd4 into Reversed Grunfeld setups. These positions are very unique to this repertoire and make full use of the specific delayed c4 move order Sielecki recommends. That in mind, there’s a decent case for entering the repertoire via 1.Nf3, 2.g3, 3.Bg2 and only deciding to play d4 in some cases, or even go into a Symmetrical English if you prefer that to the recommended positions where your d-pawn gets exchanged off so early.

It’s a good repertoire and I look forward to trying it out more online and eventually over the board. I can’t wait for the book to be published though as I find this way of absorbing the information much easier. In the meantime I’ll stick the rep into my own ChessBase files as I learn it.
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #47 - 06/17/19 at 15:45:13
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winawer77 wrote on 06/14/19 at 12:07:39:
I’m very interested in this repertoire as it’s a perfect way of avoiding Benko/Benoni/Grünfeld (among other things) without having to resort to d-pawn specials all the time. This repertoire could solve many problems for me before I  just switch to 1.c4 entirely.

However, I’ve never used Chessable, and I’ve had some difficulty in finding out what it’s like. Is everything done through the MoveTrainer program, or is there any traditional analysis like you would expect in ChessPub, for example? Is there a book/index to search for a specific variation, for example?

Apologies if these questions are a little off-topic, but the website (at least to me) doesn’t make it as clear as I apparently need it to be.


You can browse repertoire tree by making moves.  You can also just read the chapters without training the moves. I have two of his products, the 1.e4 and the 1...e5 Petroff repertoire but I personally use Chess Position Trainer for storing/training my repertoire.

Maybe in the future I'm going to switch to the Chesstempo opening trainer because offline software like this is getting outdated. And I absolutely hate Chessbase. (and don't understand why it hasn't got a spaced repetition training mode like CPT and Chessable).
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #46 - 06/16/19 at 20:44:00
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Stigma wrote on 06/14/19 at 09:24:43:
katar wrote on 06/13/19 at 23:16:44:
JFugre wrote on 06/13/19 at 20:36:40:
every new book immediately has tens of enormously glowing reviews
Yes, it seems an enormously glowing "review" is part of the bargain to become a "beta-tester" at Chessable.  (Beta-testers get the e-books for free.)

This is an exaggeration. There have been a number of "non-glowing" reviews from beta testers too, and the company explicitly encourages reviewers to be honest. But you have to understand the dynamic here: The beta testers volunteer for it, and usually they will volunteer only for courses they already want or are interested in, or even have in another format and already love. From that starting point they spend many hours to help improve the product. And if they have major complaints that could have resulted in a negative review, these will often be addressed and fixed before publication.

So it's not surprising that most reviews by beta testers will be very positive. Though I once helped beta test a course where the comments from us testers were negative enough that Chessable decided not to publish it in that form since it needed a lot more work from the author.

Full disclosure: I have beta tested around 7 courses for Chessable, and my reviews have been very positive. I've simply chosen to help only with courses I had every reason to believe would be excellent and relevant to me.


I fully agree. You volunteer for courses you are interested in and in my experience most issues that are raised will be  addressed during beta testing. So a >= 4 star rating should not be a surprise. But even so one of my reviews was pretty negative about the course it discussed and I also gave only one 5 star rating so far.

One additional point is that there are no guidelines I know of that tell you how to decide whether a course deserves a 1-, 2-, 3-, 4- or 5-star rating. I believe most reviewers tend to be a little bit too generous when in doubt.

My suggestion is to look at the pro and con sections most reviews contain and check other reviews by the same reviewer. Then you get a better idea of how strict or generous the given reviewer is.



  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #45 - 06/15/19 at 12:19:36
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winawer77 wrote on 06/14/19 at 12:07:39:
I’m very interested in this repertoire as it’s a perfect way of avoiding Benko/Benoni/Grünfeld (among other things) without having to resort to d-pawn specials all the time. This repertoire could solve many problems for me before I  just switch to 1.c4 entirely.

However, I’ve never used Chessable, and I’ve had some difficulty in finding out what it’s like. Is everything done through the MoveTrainer program, or is there any traditional analysis like you would expect in ChessPub, for example? Is there a book/index to search for a specific variation, for example?

Apologies if these questions are a little off-topic, but the website (at least to me) doesn’t make it as clear as I apparently need it to be.


Just sign up and get one of the free courses to test it out. Personally I am not a fan of the Move Trainer, I'm old school that way. On the Plus side some of the courses are quite good and some are exclusive, moreover if you really like the KIS course you could consider creating your own pgn file from it.
  

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Leon_Trotsky
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #44 - 06/15/19 at 03:18:54
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winawer77 wrote on 06/14/19 at 12:07:39:
Is everything done through the MoveTrainer program, or is there any traditional analysis like you would expect in ChessPub, for example? Is there a book/index to search for a specific variation, for example?


If you mean that if they give you a .pgn or .cbv download file, no, you have to move pieces on your own each line with its programme.

I believe that there is tree section where you can look at what the lines are as an overwiew. But this is not the same as when you going through lines like in ChessBase where you scroll your cursor to get through the moves.
  
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Re: Keep It Simple 1.d4 by Sielecki
Reply #43 - 06/15/19 at 01:31:32
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Burgess has a good anti-Benoni section in his Cunning repertoire book. I use a combination of his lines, Maroczy bind lines, symmetrical English lines, and lines with ...c5 d5 and Nc3 in front of the c2 pawn to avoid it (though I used to do ok against real Benonis, I just didn't enjoy it). I'm hoping Sielecki will have something interesting to add here.
« Last Edit: 06/15/19 at 20:22:26 by ReneDescartes »  
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