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Normal Topic Basic Chess Endings by Reuben Fine (Read 1135 times)
an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: Basic Chess Endings by Reuben Fine
Reply #3 - 06/10/19 at 22:08:36
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I have an extra copy of Benko's 2003 revision, only lightly used but a little dusty. I would be willing to sell it for cheap, although shipping might be expensive. PM me if interested. Or anybody here can PM me.

I think Benko made a mistake revising this work. My humble opinion, he probably should have put that effort into an opus of his own. It's not easy to do, Mednis and Baburin both started and did not finish. I would estimate the load as similar to a doctoral thesis, but with questionable payoff. It's pretty amazing what Fine accomplished in a short time (six months?). In 2001 Benko was very spry; 18 years later, I wouldn't know if he still has the energy.
  
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Leon_Trotsky
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Re: Basic Chess Endings by Reuben Fine
Reply #2 - 06/10/19 at 20:21:07
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https://www.uscfsales.com/basic-chess-endings-23280.html

This is only chess shop that seems to have reprint, although in descriptive notation. It is very terse and convoluted but looks interesting.

I think that it would make much more sense to reprint 2003 McKay version with Benkö's corrections instead of older one with descriptive  Shocked

Well Fine as I see is a professional psychologist in addition to GM, so writing should come naturally   Cheesy
  
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an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: Basic Chess Endings by Reuben Fine
Reply #1 - 06/10/19 at 17:34:20
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This book is great, and was well worth my time slogging through it -- in that day and age. However, it can't really compare to modern books. Fine said the hardest part of writing the book was collecting the examples. Nowadays with databases that is no problem. And Fine's original is riddled with analytic errors, almost all of which an engine and/or tablebase would catch today. Keres is also very good, but again pre-computer era, although compared to Fine he has almost no errors. Mueller and Dvoretsky books are both very good, Flear is also doing great work. Really, any GM today, armed with a database, engine, and tablebase can surpass Fine -- provided they put in the effort.

But what is missing is the verbal explanation. Fine was both a GM and a writer. (Ditto Keres.) Plus Fine had a tremendously logical approach to endgames. If you play through the whole thing, at some point his method will "click" in your mind. I didn't experience that with other authors.

I also like Fine's examples where people (e.g. Reshevsky!) play on a piece down against a strong GM (e.g. Capablanca!). And other examples where people did the same to Reshevsky. Or the same actors play for a win down to the last pawn. It's a good antidote to the dismissive attitude that we "have to" resign in a "hopeless" position, or shake hands because it's "obviously drawn". Again, you can get the same in modern form, e.g. van Perlo.
  
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Leon_Trotsky
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Basic Chess Endings by Reuben Fine
06/09/19 at 20:53:32
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Has anyone tried this book, and how useful is it ¿ I saw that there is some reprint in 2018 but still descriptive notation.

Only algebraic edition is with Pal Benkö revisions from 2003. But this version is out of print for some reason.

How does this book compared with Keres, Müller or Dworetskij ¿
  
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