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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) State of the Kings Indian (Read 3423 times)
kylemeister
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Re: State of the Kings Indian
Reply #4 - 08/27/19 at 23:26:48
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Just an observation about the 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. h3 O-O 6. Be3 Nbd7 7. Nf3 a6 8. Be2 c5 9. O-O cd 10. Nxd4 Re8 of Ondersteijn-Markus (given by halbstark):  one of the ways that could be reached is via the Classical with 6...c5 7. 0-0 Re8 (called "a weird move" in the April KID update, and advocated on a ChessBase DVD from three years ago, Königsindische Verteidigung - Ein modernes Repertoire), as happened e.g. in ...Olafsson-Andersson 1977.
  
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FreeRepublic
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Re: State of the Kings Indian
Reply #3 - 08/27/19 at 22:44:54
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I used to play the KID. My recollection is that some part of my repertoire was refuted every month. I would search theory, published games and, if need be, use my own noggin. I would eventually find a fix.

Bent Larsen made a comment that he liked to play the KID against the Russians because he thought it might be unsound! I interpreted that as meaning that the KID gave him a back-against-the-wall mentality that he used to play his best chess - and it often worked.

Now that I'm retired, I'm thinking of going back to the KID myself. I see nothing has changed. It's as unsound (and viable?) as ever.

I'm afraid your analysis did not display or download for me. But I can attest that the Magokanov is a challenge. IM David Vigorito, Chess Publishing, has covered the line several times. In June 2019 he provided two games. Modern-Chess.com has two recent books devoted to it, from the white perspective. GM Bologan covers it some in his recent book on the KID.

I'm beginning to look at these lines with Stockfish 10. It seems to me that black hangs in there, though sometimes the analysis is long. SF10 seems to have something referred to as "analysis contempt," I kid you not. In very complex positions it gives different evaluations depending on whether or it is white or black to move. But around 10 moves in, it settles down to a more stable evaluation.

It often pays to look at a position with your own eyes. For example if you have a simplified position with equal material and generally equally placed pieces and pawns, SF10 may give white an advantage because he has a bishop vs a knight or has two connected pawns on one side vs two isolated pawns. Sure white is "better," but perhaps it's not likely to mean anything.

The fiancheto line has always been a headache. I think ...c6 ...d5 is perfectly viable and not nearly so boring as people may think. I'd rather find chances there, than in the Petroff. This line could be the complete answer IMO. The biggest problem is style. King's Indian players do not want to play a Gruenfeld/Slav. Nor do Gruenfeld players. Nor do Slav players. So, like Rodney Dangerfield, It don't get no respect.

Early ...c5 lines have lots of potential to get out of theory - or at least your opponents theory. ...d6, ...c6, ...Bf5 has some appeal to this KI player.

Also the Mar Del Plata is as challenging as ever. Nor should one ignore the Saemish or Averbach. The Petrosian line may transpose to the Magakonov.

The KID is not easy, but if you're not losing, you're probably winning!
  
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halbstark
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Re: State of the Kings Indian
Reply #2 - 08/27/19 at 22:01:10
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To be honest most of the times I come up with my opening lines by looking at the Livebook and -database of Chessbase. I simply saw some recent games played by some strong GMs. A really interesting game was the following one played by Adhiban.
Adhiban played c6 after Na6, but both moves can transpose to each other



I haven´t analyzed these lines really deeply. (8.Rc1 seems to avoid this nice 8...Nh5-ideas for some concrete reasons and might be worth a try.) But at least I couldn´t find a clesr refutation.

The c6-move order gives some independant possibilities, if White goes for example for 7.Bg5. Then black has an immediate d6-d5 like in the following game.


The move 6...a6 is combined with the idea of playing Nbd7 and c5. If White does for d4-d5, then you go benkostyle with b5. If White leaves his pawn on d4, then you take and play some hedgehog position with a bishop on g7. The normal setup is b6, Bb7, e6, Re8 and hopefully a well timed d6-d5 break. I am not sure about the objective evaluation of this line, but black is hoping, that the move h3 does more harm than good to the white position. At least it seems like playable idea.

  
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PatzerNoster
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Re: State of the Kings Indian
Reply #1 - 08/27/19 at 20:36:25
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halbstark wrote on 08/27/19 at 16:47:34:
Black seems to have other nice options against the Makaganow like 6...a6 or 6...c6, which seem to be more or less fine for black.


Do you have any references for that?
I am a regular King's Indian player and I hear about these moves for the first time.
  
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halbstark
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State of the Kings Indian
08/27/19 at 16:47:34
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Hi guys,

a few years back I was a big KID addict. When Naka, Ding, Grischuk and other played it regulary, I played it in every black game against 1.d4.

Then all the elite players stopped playing it and so did I. My main reason was that everyone started playing the Makaganow with h3 and at some point I was getting really tired of these positions. Especially because the h3-trend was new and the white players, who chose this line, were really well prepared in general and at some point I considered the main line against it more or less refuted

Black has different moves here 10...Nf6 or 10...Nf4, but with engine assistance there does always seem to be a white advantage.

But now a few years later I would like to pick up the KID once again. Black seems to have other nice options against the Makaganow like 6...a6 or 6...c6, which seem to be more or less fine for black.
So what do you guys think are the critical lines these days against the KID? And do you think it is just fashion, that you don´t see it played in high level chess? Or has it something to do with the objective evaluation in the critical lines?
  
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