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Normal Topic Best book on the QID? (Read 488 times)
nestor
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Re: Best book on the QID?
Reply #6 - 02/15/20 at 08:46:47
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Roiz and Solozhenkin both cover the main line with 5...Bb4+. D'Costa offers both 5...Bb7 6.Bg2 Bb4+7.Bd2 a5 and 5...b5. I'm not aware of any early repetitions in any of these lines.
  
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BobbyDigital80
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Re: Best book on the QID?
Reply #5 - 02/14/20 at 09:22:07
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I’m trying to decide which variation to play against 4.g3 Ba6 5.b3, so I’m not exactly sure which book(s) to get sense since different authors recommend different lines. I’m leaning towards the main line so maybe Roiz or Solozhenkin. But one of my main issues is wanting to avoid early repetitions in the opening. I’m not looking for absolute equality like how a GM would. My USCF rating 2138 so I usually want to create winning chances. Maybe a sideline is more suitable if trying to play for a win.

I believe some of those Grandmaster Repertoire books don’t offer much in the way of alternatives. Is this correct? It’s something I’ve noticed before. Maybe Solozhenkin provides more alternatives in his recommendations...?
  
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RoleyPoley
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Re: Best book on the QID?
Reply #4 - 02/13/20 at 11:05:29
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nestor wrote on 02/13/20 at 09:47:23:
Or you could face the same opponents as me, in which case you will get 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 or 2.Bf4 all the time and never get to play the 0D090B050E51520C1A6000 at all...


Could you not play a different move order?
  

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RoleyPoley
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Re: Best book on the QID?
Reply #3 - 02/13/20 at 11:03:40
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 02/13/20 at 03:47:11:
Any suggestions for the best 1C313C3C271A3739372A3F32666E5E01 book? I’m interested in both explanations and theory. I know there’s Play the Queen’s Indian by Greet, Chess Explained: The Queen’s Indian by Peter Wells, and the two newer books by Roiz and Solozhenkin. I haven’t heard much about these last two. What do you guys recommend and what are the pros/cons of these books (or any others)?


Havent read any of the books.

My experience of Well's writing from his Tromp book and the caro kann one in the Chess Explained series are a very positive one for discussion of ideas and positions. I dont know how much theory or understanding has moved on since it was published. I think the Greet one may also have been positively recieved upon release, again its a little bit old so....
  

"As Mikhail Tal would say ' Let's have a bit of hooliganism! '"

Victor Bologan.
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nestor
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Re: Best book on the QID?
Reply #2 - 02/13/20 at 09:47:23
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The Queen's Indian is well served for good books. I think the best is Roiz (Quality Chess, 2018): it's big at 400+ pages, but all the theory and explanations anyone could reasonably ask for. Solozhenkin (Chess Stars, 2018) is also very reliable: a bit easier to manage at 300+ pages, a bit less in the way of explanation, but more than enough for a sound repertoire. If you like extensive notes and explanations aimed at the 1800-2200 range (my estimate), D'Costa (Everyman 2015) is extremely good. Of the older books, Wells in particular will teach you how to play the opening from scratch, but a lot has happened in some lines since he wrote and his book won't tell you how to play (or avoid) them.

The above books give varying types of help regarding early deviations from the standard sequence 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6. Roiz covers 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 Bb4+ 4.Bd2 and 4.Nbd2, but after 4.Nc3 he refers you to his companion book on the Nimzo (also excellent). Solozhenkin covers third move alternatives after 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 (including 3.Bg5 and 3.Bf4, but also others), and also has a chapter on 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 b6. The latter is important because you can easily get move ordered, e.g. after 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 b6 4.Bg2 Bb7 5.d4 you are out of book if you have only prepared main lines with ...Ba6. However Solozhenkin doesn't cover the specific sequence Roiz caters for, namely 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 (which prevents a pure QID); a little bit disappointing, particularly as this is well known to be Avrukh's preferred move order. D'Costa gives some lines after 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 b6 and 2.g3 b6; his book emphasises explanations and doesn't set out to provide the same depth of theory as the other two.

Or you could face the same opponents as me, in which case you will get 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 or 2.Bf4 all the time and never get to play the QID at all...
  
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MartinC
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Re: Best book on the QID?
Reply #1 - 02/13/20 at 09:05:43
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Wells is very nice for explanations at least.
  
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BobbyDigital80
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Best book on the QID?
02/13/20 at 03:47:11
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Any suggestions for the best QID book? I’m interested in both explanations and theory. I know there’s Play the Queen’s Indian by Greet, Chess Explained: The Queen’s Indian by Peter Wells, and the two newer books by Roiz and Solozhenkin. I haven’t heard much about these last two. What do you guys recommend and what are the pros/cons of these books (or any others)?
  
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