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Normal Topic Kingside fianchetto against the Colle-Zukertort (Read 440 times)
LeeRoth
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Re: Kingside fianchetto against the Colle-Zukertort
Reply #4 - 03/10/20 at 02:06:56
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I had to Google it too.  I found this:  http://www.zuka-chess-opening.net/resources/g6Intro.pdf And then updated my prior post.   Smiley
« Last Edit: 03/10/20 at 12:18:39 by LeeRoth »  
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Stigma
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Re: Kingside fianchetto against the Colle-Zukertort
Reply #3 - 03/10/20 at 01:59:01
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LeeRoth wrote on 03/10/20 at 01:09:31:
Finally, there was an amateur player who recommended something he called Zuka.

I had to google a bit to find out which lines "Zuka" actually involved. But I finally found an informative review of the book by none other than Eric Schiller: https://www.chess.com/article/view/book-review-zuka

Looks like it's largely based on lines involving e2-e3, turning the KID into a reversed KIA, trying to delay Nc3 against the Grünfeld, and playing a form of London against the Dutch. Not exactly wild attacking lines on the face of it.
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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LeeRoth
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Re: Kingside fianchetto against the Colle-Zukertort
Reply #2 - 03/10/20 at 01:09:31
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It’s a known limitation.  Different authors have recommended different approaches:

Aaron Summerscale (A Killer Chess Opening Repertoire), Sverre Johnsen  (who updated the Summerscale book) and Richard Palliser (Starting Out d-Pawn Attacks) all recommend the Barry Attack/Pirc.

There is also a related opening called the Tarzan Attack, which has been played by Artur Kogan.

In the Ultimate Colle, Gary Lane suggests a set up similar to the C-Z with d4, Nf3, e3, Be2, b3 and Bb2.  White avoids Bd3, which might run into Black’s ..e7-..e5-..e4 idea.

Keep it Simple does not recommend the C-Z, but Christof Sielecki suggests a double fianchetto system:  d4, Nf3, g3, Bg2, b3, Bb2, which might work for you.  The KID chapter is available as part of the free sample pages.

Finally, there was an amateur player who recommended something he called Zuka.  The basic set up was d4, Nf3, c4, e3, Nc3, Be2.

  
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Re: Kingside fianchetto against the Colle-Zukertort
Reply #1 - 03/09/20 at 20:51:16
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ICWiener6666 wrote on 03/09/20 at 19:34:26:
I've been playing the Colle-Zukertort for a while now and have beaten accomplished players with it. However I always find White's position difficult when Black decides to do a fianchetto on the kingside.

The reason is that the point of the Zukertort is to dominate the diagonal using the bishop, however this domination is put into question when black fianchetto's.

What should my plan be in such a case? Or is this a known limitation to the Colle-Zukertort system?


Depends on the move order. In the Killer Repertoire by Summerscale white often seeks to play either a '150 attack' against a pirc set up (black plays a pawn to d6) or a 'Barry Attack' against a Grunfeld set up (black plays a pawn to d5). Instead of looking to play Bb2 in these lines its Be3 with a view to Bh6 at some point and a kingside attack.
  

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Kingside fianchetto against the Colle-Zukertort
03/09/20 at 19:34:26
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I've been playing the Colle-Zukertort for a while now and have beaten accomplished players with it. However I always find White's position difficult when Black decides to do a fianchetto on the kingside.

The reason is that the point of the Zukertort is to dominate the diagonal using the bishop, however this domination is put into question when black fianchetto's.

What should my plan be in such a case? Or is this a known limitation to the Colle-Zukertort system?
  
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