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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies (Read 4748 times)
bragesjo
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #27 - 02/21/22 at 19:42:35
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Many proposed systems in Nimzo are lines not liked by modern engines. It can be interpreated in in several ways.

In Bb7 Queens Indian idea of Na6 is modern and relative new but there was some strange line recommend where Bishop left the long diagnal to white that modern engines does not like.

Tiviakov DVD covers this system in Bb7 Queens Indian and there is also a Martin 60 min about position after Na6.
  
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #26 - 02/20/22 at 17:43:00
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bragesjo wrote on 01/11/22 at 13:58:56:
At normal clubplayer level the lines could very well work out since in over the board play its maybee not obious to find the refuration and in over the board club play is maybee not a problem that modern engines think white has a considerbly advatage between 0.8 and 1.4 in different lines.

However as a Correspondence Chess player I will not play any of this lines as theory source but it opened my eyes towards playing Queens Indian and I knew next to nothing about Bb7 line. I will however still read the books as idea and understanding but not as part of repertoar


What are the lines that are more dubious? There are plenty of choices in the Nimzo and it's easy to find a good alternative. The queen's indian is quite different as it has been put under serious pressure by engines. If the repertoire provides a viable QI repertoire it could still have some value especially if 1.Nf3 is treated in QI style.
  
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bragesjo
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #25 - 01/11/22 at 13:58:56
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At normal clubplayer level the lines could very well work out since in over the board play its maybee not obious to find the refuration and in over the board club play is maybee not a problem that modern engines think white has a considerbly advatage between 0.8 and 1.4 in different lines.

However as a Correspondence Chess player I will not play any of this lines as theory source but it opened my eyes towards playing Queens Indian and I knew next to nothing about Bb7 line. I will however still read the books as idea and understanding but not as part of repertoar
« Last Edit: 01/11/22 at 15:56:08 by bragesjo »  
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FreeRepublic
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #24 - 01/09/22 at 14:59:08
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Repertoire books promise a complete solution for one side. The idea has a lot of appeal. The appeal is especially great for those who are starting out. However if you think that at least a part of your repertoire is in place, you may find some of the material irrelevant, or have to to look elsewhere for the material that you want.

I won't criticize the repertoire idea, but I also see merit in coverage of an entire opening. A recent example is the Panczyk and Ilczuk book on the Vienna variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined. Whether they like a line or not, it's there. Whether I agree or disagree with their assessment of a particular line, it is there.

I still like Steffen Pedersen's old books on 3Nc3 French, 3Nd2 French, Meran, and Anti-Meran. He covered all lines (of the time) with a balanced approach, simply trying to find and present best play for both sides. As I've gone all electronic, I regret that those books have never been re-issued in electronic form.
  
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Laramonet
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #23 - 01/09/22 at 13:45:17
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I think I understand Najdorfslayer's point. As a long-standing Caro Kann player, I'm interested in any book that comes out but check the contents to assess the chances that they will be useful to me. For example, it would take an awful lot for me to switch my answer to the Advance from C5 to Bf5. Although Scharndorff recommends this in his latest book, I still got it for other lines.
Potentially the issue is worse for an answer to d4, especially when the author is offering a repertoire to cover the English and Nf6 as well. Against d4, lines tend perhaps to be more inter-related and one choice rules out another. This book has a market but maybe not for the player experienced with these openings, like Najdorfslayer. For me, looking for an alternative answer to d4, it hits the mark by stressing ideas and giving a whole repertoire framework. Now, if I play the repertoire for a couple of seasons, I'm sure there may be parts I won't like and my switch out. For example my earlier reply on the Nc3 idea in his line against the London. I'll do more research but may have to adapt my current line against the London which includes d5.
As Paddy explains, the stress on strategic lines, with the minimum of memorization was the goal Davies set himself. Experience with the book and lines recommended will prove whether he was successful, while acknowledging that some lines will be changed with growing familiarity.
  
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Paddy
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #22 - 01/09/22 at 12:50:53
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Bibs wrote on 01/08/22 at 02:48:33:
najdorfslayer wrote on 01/07/22 at 16:49:00:
As quite a seasoned NID/7F545F4E3D01 player I was quite interested in this book, but actually recommends nothing I’d find remotely useful.

I’m actually coming round to thinking that these type of repertoire book are not for me.

I think it’s much better to explore the opening yourself and see what lines with you. It’s rare all the lines in one book will suit someone.

For example my NID repertoire is built from lots on sources.

4 Qc2 I play 4…0-0 then after 5 a3 Bxc3 6 Qxc3 b6
This is covered well in The Fierce NID by Chessable.

4 e3 Mostly follow GM Repertoire Nimzo-Indian but some lines I don’t like I supplement with other sources for example I prefer 5 Nge2 d5 6 a3 Be7 given in Thinkers New book.
4 f3 I follow …d5 from The Modernized Nimzo: QG !Systems.

You get the idea.


It could well just be that Davies' repertoire books are not for you.
Word here thus far seems that to be that the book is under-researched and underwhelming.


Both openings (NID and QID) are very flexible and allow for quite varied interpretations.

I agree that the approach of "mix-and-match from various sources" (ideally plus personal research) can be recommended for anyone who has the time and diligence.

In general, Nigel Davies has opted to recommend lines with considerable strategic content and with few forced variations that require memorisation (although these can never be completely avoided, of course), which seems to me to be an entirely valid and sensible approach for a book aimed at club-level players (as well as a timely reminder that for many, if not most, club players the "memorise it all" approach of Chessable might not be the most appropriate). 

In the introduction Davies writes:
"The way I have written this book is so that it can be read from cover to cover, explaining the plans and a wide variety of structures and plans, meaning the reader can gain an insight into the strategic breadth of these defences. This may come as an unpleasant surprise for those expecting a telephone directory of game references and engine analysis, but I would urge you to bear with the approach that is offered.
Getting a good general feel for an opening makes it easier to learn any variations that are needed, or improvise if the opponent fails to cooperate with your preparation."

I suggest the book should be judged largely according to how well the author has achieved his expressed aims.
  
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #21 - 01/08/22 at 02:48:33
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najdorfslayer wrote on 01/07/22 at 16:49:00:
As quite a seasoned NID/757A717F74697D68777A627E691B03 player I was quite interested in this book, but actually recommends nothing I’d find remotely useful.

I’m actually coming round to thinking that these type of repertoire book are not for me.

I think it’s much better to explore the opening yourself and see what lines with you. It’s rare all the lines in one book will suit someone.

For example my NID repertoire is built from lots on sources.

4 Qc2 I play 4…0-0 then after 5 a3 Bxc3 6 Qxc3 b6
This is covered well in The Fierce NID by Chessable.

4 e3 Mostly follow GM Repertoire Nimzo-Indian but some lines I don’t like I supplement with other sources for example I prefer 5 Nge2 d5 6 a3 Be7 given in Thinkers New book.
4 f3 I follow …d5 from The Modernized Nimzo: QG !Systems.

You get the idea.


It could well just be that Davies' repertoire books are not for you.
Word here thus far seems that to be that the book is under-researched and underwhelming.
  
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najdorfslayer
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #20 - 01/07/22 at 16:49:00
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As quite a seasoned NID/QID player I was quite interested in this book, but actually recommends nothing I’d find remotely useful.

I’m actually coming round to thinking that these type of repertoire book are not for me.

I think it’s much better to explore the opening yourself and see what lines with you. It’s rare all the lines in one book will suit someone.

For example my NID repertoire is built from lots on sources.

4 Qc2 I play 4…0-0 then after 5 a3 Bxc3 6 Qxc3 b6
This is covered well in The Fierce NID by Chessable.

4 e3 Mostly follow GM Repertoire Nimzo-Indian but some lines I don’t like I supplement with other sources for example I prefer 5 Nge2 d5 6 a3 Be7 given in Thinkers New book.
4 f3 I follow …d5 from The Modernized Nimzo: QG !Systems.

You get the idea.
  
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bragesjo
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #19 - 01/03/22 at 14:04:12
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I looked at more lines and modern engines does not like blacks position at all in many lines in the entire book. Engine used is an old Fritz from 2013 and most books are from pre computer era and database used is Chesstempos online database. Shure the author is a GM but still advise to check further into the lines with a modern engine before playing then.
  
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #18 - 01/03/22 at 12:31:25
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 01/03/22 at 10:24:59:
In the Catalan does he cover 3.g3 c5 4.Nf3, transposing into the English?


Yes - two games with 4...cxd4 5.Nxd4 d5 6.Bg2 e5.
  
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #17 - 01/03/22 at 10:24:59
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In the Catalan does he cover 3.g3 c5 4.Nf3, transposing into the English?
  
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #16 - 01/02/22 at 20:37:55
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With just a little more help, maybe you're right ! d5 / Na6 / Be7 looks like it holds on but not that much fun.
  
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #15 - 01/02/22 at 20:17:36
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Is b6 against the London that clear ? I found an Aronian v Nepo game from June, admittedly blitz but still complex and playable ?
1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bf4 c5 4.e3 b6 5.Nc3 cd 6.Nb5 Nd5 7.Qd4 Nc6 8.Qa4 Bb4+
  
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bragesjo
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #14 - 12/29/21 at 15:39:50
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I also looked a bit at hes line vs f3 Nimzo. The Nimzo Bogo book I mentioned actuelly tried to make that concrete line to work but thought that white would get dangereus play foe severa positioal reasons and thus recommend an other line nstead. I am not saying that recommendation is bad, everyone can analyse and decide themself.
  
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bragesjo
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Re: Nimzo and Queen’s Indian book by Nigel Davies
Reply #13 - 12/28/21 at 09:57:50
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I also noticed a thing in Nimzo Qc2 Nc6. Opening repertoar  Nimzo and Bogo Indian is not in the litteratur list yet they can transpose to the same line where computers favor white for some reason.  Nimzo Bogo Indian book suggested an improvent over the older theory that Nimzo Queens Indian book suggests.
  
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