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Normal Topic Sveshnikov - 7.Nd5 Nxd5 8.exd Nb8 9.Qf3!? (Read 1625 times)
Sacapawn
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Re: Sveshnikov - 7.Nd5 Nxd5 8.exd Nb8 9.Qf3!?
Reply #2 - 08/06/07 at 07:37:09
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Rogozenko Sveshnikov Reloaded has the game Solleveld-Alekseev, 2003, in a footnote:
9.-,a6 10.Qa3 Be7 11.Bg5 f6 12.Bd2 0-0 13.Bb4 Qd7! and after a few more moves it is assessed "and Black's chances are by no means worse".



  
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kylemeister
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Re: Sveshnikov - 7.Nd5 Nxd5 8.exd Nb8 9.Qf3!?
Reply #1 - 07/31/07 at 17:13:48
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I believe this is discussed in one of the SOS books (edited by Jeroen Bosch).  That about exhausts my knowledge of it.
  
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Lou_Cyber
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Sveshnikov - 7.Nd5 Nxd5 8.exd Nb8 9.Qf3!?
07/31/07 at 16:52:42
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Hi,

this looks like an interesting sideline for white players. The first moves:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 e5 6.Ndb5 d6 7.Nd5!? (an early deviation, main line is 7.Bg5 a6 etc.) Nxd5 8.exd Nb8

The retreat to the original field looks odd, but is considered best so far. The only alternative is Ne7, where white can claim a small advantage according to my resources.

9.Qf3!? a6 10.Qa3!?

White spends two precious moves in the opening only to move the queen to the corner of the board vis a vis the black rook. Yet white gets good chances and scores very well in this line. The weak spot d6 is attacked crudely, and black has to be careful, or he may be routed very fast.

10. ... Be7
11.Bg5 f6

After the natural 11....Bxg5? black was crushed in 18 moves after 12.Nxd6+ Kf8 13.Nxc8+ Kg8 14.Nc6 Be7 15.Nxb7 Qxd5 16.Qxe7 Qe4+ 17.Be2 Nc6 18.Qxf7+, Solak (2564) - Bogosavljevic (2460), Virsac 2007.

12.Bd2

I had interesting and successful blitz games with this line. I found an article on this line in the net. but alas I can´t recollect where. Any ideas, someone?

And what do you think of this line anyway, is it worth to study seriously? Yakuvich doesn´t think so, at least he doesn´t mention it in his book. Has somebody got Rogozenkos svesh reloaded, what is his assessment?

Best wishes, Lou
  

If you try, you may lose. If you don´t try, you have lost.
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